Match!

A framework to identify factors influencing navigational risk for Maritime Autonomous Surface Ships

Published on Apr 15, 2020in Ocean Engineering2.73
· DOI :10.1016/J.OCEANENG.2020.107188
Cunlong Fan1
Estimated H-index: 1
(WUT: Wuhan University of Technology),
Krzysztof Wróbel4
Estimated H-index: 4
+ 3 AuthorsDi Zhang50
Estimated H-index: 50
(WUT: Wuhan University of Technology)
Abstract
Abstract Maritime Autonomous Surface Ships (MASS) have recently drawn significant attention throughout academia, governments, and industry. One of the requirements for MASS is that they should at least be as safe as conventional ships. Often, to measure their level of safety, the concept of risk is adopted, and risk influencing factors are determined. This paper proposes a framework for the identification of factors that influence the navigational risk of remotely controlled MASS without crews on board. Therein, four operational phases are considered: voyage planning, berthing and unberthing, port approaching and departing, as well as open sea navigation. For each phase, four types of factors are assigned related to human, ship, environment, and technology. To populate the framework, a thorough literature review is conducted, which is further supported by the elicitation of expert knowledge. As a result, 23 human-related factors, 12 ship-related factors, 8 environment-related factors, and 12 technology-related factors were defined. The proposed framework can be employed for any risk and safety analysis related to remote-controlled MASS. This, in turn, may assist the processes of design and operational planning of maritime transportation systems accommodating MASS and its remote-control center, e.g., the shore control center.
  • References (61)
  • Citations (1)
📖 Papers frequently viewed together
2019
5 Authors (Jie Xue, ..., Chaozhong Wu)
2019
3 Authors (Yuheng Li, ..., Zhengjiang Liu)
78% of Scinapse members use related papers. After signing in, all features are FREE.
References61
Newest
#1Ingrid Bouwer Utne (NTNU: Norwegian University of Science and Technology)H-Index: 20
#2Børge Rokseth (NTNU: Norwegian University of Science and Technology)H-Index: 3
Last. Jan Erik Vinnem (NTNU: Norwegian University of Science and Technology)H-Index: 22
view all 4 authors...
Abstract The objective of this paper is to outline a framework for online risk modelling for autonomous ships. There is a clear trend towards increased autonomy and intelligence in ships because it enables new functionality, as well as safer and more cost-efficient operations. Nevertheless, emerging risks are involved, related to lack of knowledge and operational experience with the autonomous systems, the dependency on complex software-based control systems, as well as a limited ability to veri...
1 CitationsSource
#1Marilia Abilio Ramos (NTNU: Norwegian University of Science and Technology)H-Index: 1
#2Christoph Alexander Thieme (NTNU: Norwegian University of Science and Technology)H-Index: 4
Last. Ali Mosleh (UCLA: University of California, Los Angeles)H-Index: 30
view all 4 authors...
Abstract Maritime Autonomous Surface Ships (MASS) are the subject of a diversity of projects and some are in testing phase. MASS will probably include operators working in a shore control center (SCC), whose responsibilities may vary from supervision to remote control, according to Level of Autonomy (LoA) of the voyage. Moreover, MASS may operate with a dynamic LoA. The strong reliance on Human-Autonomous System collaboration and the dynamic LoA should be comprised on the analysis of MASS to ens...
2 CitationsSource
AbstractThe article seeks to contribute to the development of a conceptual framework for the ongoing regulatory discussions on autonomous ships at the International Maritime Organization (IMO). It ...
Source
#1Marilia Abilio Ramos (NTNU: Norwegian University of Science and Technology)H-Index: 1
#2Ingrid Bouwer Utne (NTNU: Norwegian University of Science and Technology)H-Index: 20
Last. Ali Mosleh (UCLA: University of California, Los Angeles)H-Index: 30
view all 3 authors...
Abstract Numerous research and industry initiatives have increasingly aimed at developing maritime surface autonomous ships (MASS). Among the motivations for the use of MASS is the potential increase in safety when compared to traditional manned ships – particularly regarding human error. However, in spite of having less human intervention, MASS will rely on humans working on an onshore control center for their operation. There have been great advances in investigating the technical aspects of M...
3 CitationsSource
Source
Source
#2Sirpa KannosH-Index: 1
2 Citations
Source
#1Romanas PuisaH-Index: 3
#2Lin LinH-Index: 2
Last. Dracos VassalosH-Index: 15
view all 4 authors...
Abstract Lessons from maritime accidents are conventionally used to inform safety improvements in design and operation of ships. However, this process is only as good as the core understanding derived from accident analysis is. The current explanation of accidents is limited to direct and contributing causal factors, whereas the role of a wider socio-technical context that has given rise to causal mechanisms behind major maritime accidents in recent years is left unexplained. The paper describes...
3 CitationsSource
#1Yemao Man (Chalmers University of Technology)H-Index: 4
#2Reto Weber (Chalmers University of Technology)H-Index: 1
Last. Scott MacKinnon (Chalmers University of Technology)H-Index: 16
view all 5 authors...
Abstract In recent years there has been increasing research and commercial activities regarding the development of remotely monitored and controlled unmanned ships. Much of this focus is related to the intended migration of operators from ship to shore and the integration of a decision support system to maintain safety of navigation. For this reason, the centralized context onboard could shift to a distributed context characterized as a ¨ship-shore system¨. Although there is substantial research...
1 CitationsSource
Cited By1
Newest
#1Mateusz Gil (Aalto University)
#2Krzysztof WróbelH-Index: 4
Last. Floris Goerlandt (Aalto University)H-Index: 22
view all 4 authors...
Abstract Maritime transport faces new safety-related challenges resulting from constantly increasing traffic density, along with increasing dimensions of ships. Consequently, the number of new concepts related to Decision Support Systems (DSSs) supporting safe shipborne operations in the presence of reduced ship manning is rapidly growing, both in academia and industry. However, there is a lack of a systematic description of the state-of-the-art in this field. Moreover, there is no comprehensive...
1 CitationsSource