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The Effects of Cannabis Use: A Test Among Dual Electronic and Combustible Cigarette Users.

Published on Mar 11, 2020in American Journal on Addictions1.946
· DOI :10.1111/AJAD.13021
Nubia A. Mayorga5
Estimated H-index: 5
(UH: University of Houston),
Lorra Garey9
Estimated H-index: 9
(UH: University of Houston)
+ 2 AuthorsMichael J. Zvolensky66
Estimated H-index: 66
(UH: University of Houston)
Abstract
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Despite greater rates of cannabis use among those that smoke combustible cigarettes, it is currently unknown whether cannabis use is related to e-cigarette dependence or maladaptive beliefs about combustible cigarettes. Therefore, the current study sought to identify whether adult dual users of combustible and e-cigarettes (ie, dual users) who also used cannabis differed from dual users who did not use cannabis on e-cigarette dependence severity, perceived barriers to quitting, and perception of risks and of benefits of e-cigarettes. METHODS: Participants were 414 current dual users (48.3% female, Mage = 35.1 years, SD = 10.0), 51% of whom were current cannabis users. RESULTS: Dual users who reported current cannabis use evidenced more severe dependence on e-cigarettes (etap (2) = 0.12), higher perceived barriers for quitting e-cigarettes (etap (2) = 0.06), and greater perceived benefits (etap (2) = 0.03) as well as higher perception of risks (etap (2) = 0.03) for using e-cigarettes. The results were evident after controlling for the variance associated with sex, age, education, income, and frequency of e-cigarette use. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS: Overall, the current findings suggest cannabis may be an important type of substance use behavior that is relevant to e-cigarette dependence and beliefs about use and quitting among adult dual users. SCIENTIFIC SIGNIFICANCE: The present data extend current understanding of dual users by contextualizing cannabis use within e-cigarette and combustible cigarette use behaviors and highlight a potential substance use behavior that may be targetable in the framework of nicotine cessation. (Am J Addict 2020;00:00-00).
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#1Michael J. Zvolensky (UH: University of Houston)H-Index: 66
#2Nubia A. Mayorga (UH: University of Houston)H-Index: 5
Last. Lorra Garey (UH: University of Houston)H-Index: 9
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Samples drawn from commercial online panel data (OPD) are becoming more prevalent in applied psychology research, but they remain controversial due to concerns with data quality. In order to examine the validity of OPD, we conduct meta-analyses of online panel samples and compare internal reliability estimates for scales and effect size estimates for IV–DV relations commonly found in the field with those based on conventionally sourced data. Results based on 90 independent samples and 32,121 par...
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Although e-cigarette use is on the rise, there is little understanding of cognitive-based individual difference factors that maintain maladaptive e-cigarette beliefs and dependence. The present investigation sought to test a theoretically-driven interactive model of e-cigarette health literacy and anxiety sensitivity (AS; fear of the consequences of anxiety) among 537 e-cigarette users (50.7% female, Mage = 35.2 years, SD = 10.1) in terms of perceived benefits and risks of e-cigarette use as wel...
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