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Spondylolysis and spinal adaptations for bipedalism: The overshoot hypothesis.

Published on Mar 3, 2020in Evolution, Medicine, and Public Health4.4
· DOI :10.1093/EMPH/EOAA003
Kimberly A. Plomp4
Estimated H-index: 4
(SFU: Simon Fraser University),
Keith Dobney35
Estimated H-index: 35
(SFU: Simon Fraser University),
Mark Collard33
Estimated H-index: 33
(SFU: Simon Fraser University)
Abstract
Background and objectives: The study reported here focused on the aetiology of spondylolysis, a vertebral pathology usually caused by a fatigue fracture. The goal was to test the Overshoot Hypothesis, which proposes that people develop spondylolysis because their vertebral shape is at the highly derived end of the range of variation within Homo sapiens. Methodology: We recorded 3D data on the final lumbar vertebrae of H. sapiens and three great ape species, and performed three analyses. First, we compared H. sapiens vertebrae with and without spondylolysis. Second, we compared H. sapiens vertebrae with and without spondylolysis to great ape vertebrae. Lastly, we compared H. sapiens vertebrae with and without spondylolysis to great ape vertebrae and to vertebrae of H. sapiens with Schmorl's nodes, which previous studies have shown tend to be located at the ancestral end of the range of H. sapiens shape variation. Results: We found that H. sapiens vertebrae with spondylolysis are significantly different in shape from healthy H. sapiens vertebrae. We also found that H. sapiens vertebrae with spondylolysis are more distant from great ape vertebrae than are healthy H. sapiens vertebrae. Lastly, we found that H. sapiens vertebrae with spondylolysis are at the opposite end of the range of shape variation than vertebrae with Schmorl's nodes. Conclusions: Our findings indicate that H. sapiens vertebrae with spondylolysis tend to exhibit highly derived traits and therefore support the Overshoot Hypothesis. Spondylolysis, it appears, is linked to our lineage's evolutionary history, especially its shift from quadrupedalism to bipedalism.Lay summary: Spondylolysis is a relatively common vertebral pathology usually caused by a fatigue fracture. There is reason to think that it might be connected with our lineage's evolutionary shift from walking on all fours to walking on two legs. We tested this idea by comparing human vertebrae with and without spondylolysis to the vertebrae of great apes. Our results support the hypothesis. They suggest that people who experience spondylolysis have vertebrae with what are effectively exaggerated adaptations for bipedalism.
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#1Kimberly A. Plomp (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 4
#2Keith Dobney (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 35
Last. Mark Collard (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 33
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Recently we proposed an evolutionary explanation for a spinal pathology that afflicts many people, intervertebral disc herniation (Plomp et al. [2015] BMC Evolutionary Biology 15, 68). Using 2D data, we found that the bodies and pedicles of lower vertebrae of pathological humans were more similar in shape to those of chimpanzees than were those of healthy humans. Based on this, we hypothesized that some individuals are more prone to intervertebral disc herniation because their vertebrae exhibit ...
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#2Una Strand Viðarsdóttir (University of Iceland)H-Index: 6
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