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Core Values and Value Conflicts in Cybersecurity: Beyond Privacy Versus Security

Published on Jan 1, 2020
· DOI :10.1007/978-3-030-29053-5_3
Ibo van de Poel24
Estimated H-index: 24
(TU Delft: Delft University of Technology),
Ibo van de Poel
Abstract
This chapter analyses some of the main values, and values conflicts, in relation to cybersecurity by distinguishing four important value clusters that should be considered when deciding on cybersecurity measures. These clusters are security, privacy, fairness and accountability. Each cluster consists of a range of further values, which can be viewed as articulating specific moral reasons relevant when devising cybersecurity measures. In addition to the four value clusters, domain-specific values that are served by computer systems, such as health, are important. Following a detailed discussion of the four relevant value clusters, potential value conflicts and value tensions are considered. The relationships of five pairs of values (privacy-security, privacy-fairness, privacy-accountability, security-accountability and security-fairness) are analysed in terms of whether they are largely supportive or conflicting. In addition, possible methods for addressing these potential value conflicts are discussed. It is concluded that values, and value conflicts, in cybersecurity should be considered in context, also taking into account the specific computer systems at play, to enable the use of nuanced and fine-grained methods for addressing the relevant value conflicts.
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