scinapse is loading now...

Plant and insect diversity along a pollution gradient: understanding species richness across trophic levels

Published on Sep 1, 2001in Biodiversity and Conservation 2.83
· DOI :10.1023/A:1011815325503
Martin Brändle23
Estimated H-index: 23
,
Uwe Amarell1
Estimated H-index: 1
+ 2 AuthorsRoland Brandl49
Estimated H-index: 49
Abstract
We analysed species richness of plants and true bugs (Insecta, Heteroptera) along a pollution gradient in Scots pine stands in Central Germany. As a consequence of particulate deposition, pH-values of soils increased in the vicinity of the emission source. Therefore, emission increased productivity. Species richness of plants increased with decreasing distance from emission source, and thus with increasing productivity. Similarly, species richness of herbivorous Heteroptera increased with decreasing distance from emission source, whereas, surprisingly, abundance decreased. The proportion of specialised herbivorous bug species is largest in the vicinity of the emission source. Thus, the diversity pattern of herbivores may be explained by the ‘specialisation hypothesis’ and not the ‘consumer rarity hypothesis’. Species richness and abundance of carnivorous Heteroptera showed no significant trend along the gradient. Overall our data favour the ‘bottom-up’ control of species diversity in the analysed system.
  • References (34)
  • Citations (27)
Cite
References34
Newest
Published on Mar 31, 2015
Nicholas J. Gotelli63
Estimated H-index: 63
,
Gary L. Entsminger5
Estimated H-index: 5
938 Citations Source Cite
Published on Feb 1, 2000in Ecography 4.52
Martin Brändle23
Estimated H-index: 23
,
Jutta Stadler15
Estimated H-index: 15
,
Roland Brandl49
Estimated H-index: 49
We used data on body size and host range of phytophagous Heteroptera in central Europe, an inverse measure of specialisation, to analyse the relationship of body size vs specialisation: 1) we found a clear positive relationship between body size and host range using species as independent data points. 2) However, a nested analysis of variance shows that most of the variance in body size occurred at higher taxonomic levels whereas most of the variance in host specialisation occurred between speci...
18 Citations Source Cite
Published on Nov 5, 1999in Science 41.06
Andy Hector55
Estimated H-index: 55
(Imperial College London),
Bernhard Schmid82
Estimated H-index: 82
(University of Zurich)
+ 31 AuthorsJ. Good6
Estimated H-index: 6
(University College Cork)
At eight European field sites, the impact of loss of plant diversity on primary productivity was simulated by synthesizing grassland communities with different numbers of plant species. Results differed in detail at each location, but there was an overall log-linear reduction of average aboveground biomass with loss of species. For a given number of species, communities with fewer functional groups were less productive. These diversity effects occurred along with differences associated with spec...
1,399 Citations Source Cite
Published on Aug 1, 1999in Ecography 4.52
Evan Siemann40
Estimated H-index: 40
(Rice University),
John Haarstad11
Estimated H-index: 11
(Rice University),
David Tilman138
Estimated H-index: 138
(Rice University)
The successional dynamics of arthropod diversity in 18 abandoned agricultural fields (age 15-54 yr) at Cedar Creek, MN, USA were determined using sweep net sampling (44833 individuals of 618 species). Total arthropod species richness and equitability (J), but not abundance, increased significantly with field successional age. Herbivore and parasite species richness, but not detritivore and predator species richness, also increased significantly with field age. All of these arthropod variables we...
89 Citations Source Cite
Published on Mar 1, 1999in Molecular Ecology 6.13
Barbara Neuffer22
Estimated H-index: 22
(University of Osnabrück),
Harald Auge27
Estimated H-index: 27
+ 2 AuthorsRoland Brandl49
Estimated H-index: 49
(University of Osnabrück)
Hybridization between plant species occurs frequently but hybrids are often restricted to ecotones or disturbed habitats. In this study we show that introgressive hybrids between the tetraploid Viola riviniana and the diploid V. reichenbachiana invaded pine forests of the Dubener Heide (central Germany), an area affected by calcareous pollutants. The spread of these violet populations was correlated with the impact of pollution on habitat conditions. We compared morphology, cytology and random a...
63 Citations Source Cite
Published on Oct 1, 1998in The American Naturalist 4.26
Diane S. Srivastava33
Estimated H-index: 33
,
John H. Lawton94
Estimated H-index: 94
ABSTRACT One of the most common explanations for an increase in species richness with productivity is what we have dubbed the “More Individuals Hypothesis.” According to this hypothesis, more productive sites can support higher total abundances and, since species richness is an increasing function of total abundance, so will it be of productivity. This hypothesis assumes that communities are limited by productivity. We tested the More Individuals Hypothesis using the detritivorous aquatic insect...
381 Citations Source Cite
Published on Sep 25, 1998in Science 41.06
A. Gonzalez1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Nottingham),
J. H. Lawton1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Nottingham)
+ 2 AuthorsI. Evans-Freke1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Nottingham)
The experimental fragmentation of landscapes of a natural ecosystem resulted in declines in the abundance and distribution of most species in the multispecies animal community inhabiting the landscapes and the extinction of many species. These declines caused the deterioration of the positive interspecific relation between local population abundance and distributional extent in this community. However, when patches were connected by habitat corridors, an immigration “rescue effect” arrested decl...
359 Citations Source Cite
Published on Sep 1, 1998in Ecology 4.62
Evan Siemann40
Estimated H-index: 40
(University of Minnesota)
Because the quantity, quality, and heterogeneity of resources should affect the diversity of consumers, plant productivity, plant composition, and plant diversity may influence the diversity of trophic levels higher up the food chain (''bottom-up'' control of diversity). Increasing plant productivity may increase herbivore diversity by: increasing the abundance of rare resources (''resource rarity hypothesis''), increasing herbivore abun- dance and local persistence (''consumer rarity hypothesis...
371 Citations Source Cite
Published on Dec 1, 1997in Ecology 4.62
Nicholas J. Gotelli63
Estimated H-index: 63
,
Gary R. Graves32
Estimated H-index: 32
1,193 Citations Source Cite
Published on Aug 29, 1997in Science 41.06
David U. Hooper29
Estimated H-index: 29
(Stanford University),
Peter M. Vitousek114
Estimated H-index: 114
(Stanford University)
The relative effects of plant richness (the number of plant functional groups) and composition (the identity of the plant functional groups) on primary productivity and soil nitrogen pools were tested experimentally. Differences in plant composition explained more of the variation in production and nitrogen dynamics than did the number of functional groups present. Thus, it is possible to identify and differentiate among potential mechanisms underlying patterns of ecosystem response to variation...
1,035 Citations Source Cite
Cited By27
Newest
Published on Jun 1, 2018in Ecology Letters 9.14
David Storch30
Estimated H-index: 30
(Charles University in Prague),
Eliška Bohdalková1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Charles University in Prague),
Jordan G. Okie17
Estimated H-index: 17
(Arizona State University)
15 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 2018
Alison E. Bennett14
Estimated H-index: 14
(Ohio State University),
Peter Orrell1
Estimated H-index: 1
(James Hutton Institute)
+ 1 AuthorsMaria J. Pozo34
Estimated H-index: 34
(Spanish National Research Council)
Our goal within this chapter is to review fungal-mediated above–belowground interactions in which belowground organisms influence aboveground organisms (or vice versa) primarily via a shared host plant, but to also highlight what we feel are the biggest areas for future research within this field: the community approach, stability, evolution, mechanisms, and application of these interactions. First, the community approach examines multiple simultaneously interacting species as communities, an ap...
1 Citations Source Cite
Published on Oct 18, 2017in PLOS ONE 2.77
Caspar A. Hallmann7
Estimated H-index: 7
(Radboud University Nijmegen),
Martin Sorg1
Estimated H-index: 1
+ 9 AuthorsThomas Hörren1
Estimated H-index: 1
Global declines in insects have sparked wide interest among scientists, politicians, and the general public. Loss of insect diversity and abundance is expected to provoke cascading effects on food webs and to jeopardize ecosystem services. Our understanding of the extent and underlying causes of this decline is based on the abundance of single species or taxonomic groups only, rather than changes in insect biomass which is more relevant for ecological functioning. Here, we used a standardized pr...
234 Citations Source Cite
Published on Oct 1, 2017in Landscape Ecology 3.83
Ronnie Walcher1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna),
Johannes Karrer1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna)
+ 6 AuthorsThomas Frank23
Estimated H-index: 23
(University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna)
Context Abandonment of extensively managed meadows is an ongoing global challenge in recent decades, particularly in mountain regions, and directly affects plant diversity. However, the extent to which plant diversity further affects associated insect pollinators or herbivores is little investigated.
3 Citations Source Cite
Published on Aug 1, 2017in Journal of Insect Conservation 1.56
Attila Torma5
Estimated H-index: 5
(University of Szeged),
Miklós Bozsó2
Estimated H-index: 2
+ 1 AuthorsRóbert Gallé9
Estimated H-index: 9
(University of Szeged)
Eastern European grasslands are still inhabited by a rich arthropod fauna, but the drivers and mechanisms influencing their communities have to be understood to ensure their future survival. Heteroptera communities were studied in 20 plot-pairs in Pannonic salt steppe–salt marsh mosaics in Hungary. The effects of vegetation characteristics, landscape diversity and the proportion of surrounding grasslands on the composition, species richness and abundance of different feeding groups of true bugs ...
1 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jul 1, 2016in International Journal of Environmental Research 1.02
M. Rusin1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
J. Gospodarek1
Estimated H-index: 1
The objective of the study was to determine the effect of the process of natural bioremediation, and bioremediation supported by ZB-01 microbiological preparation on the occurrence of Collembola andAraneaein conditions of soil contaminated by petroleum-derived substances. The studies were conducted in 2010-2012, in the area of the Experiment Station of the University of Agriculture, near Krakow. In June 2010, the soil surface was contaminated with petrol, diesel fuel and engine oil with amount o...
2 Citations Source Cite
Published on Sep 9, 2014in PLOS ONE 2.77
Michael J. Raupach19
Estimated H-index: 19
,
Lars Hendrich18
Estimated H-index: 18
+ 3 AuthorsMartin M. Gossner25
Estimated H-index: 25
(Technische Universität München)
During the last few years, DNA barcoding has become an efficient method for the identification of species. In the case of insects, most published DNA barcoding studies focus on species of the Ephemeroptera, Trichoptera, Hymenoptera and especially Lepidoptera. In this study we test the efficiency of DNA barcoding for true bugs (Hemiptera: Heteroptera), an ecological and economical highly important as well as morphologically diverse insect taxon. As part of our study we analyzed DNA barcodes for 1...
44 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jul 5, 2013in Diversity
Lee A. Dyer34
Estimated H-index: 34
,
Deborah K. Letourneau33
Estimated H-index: 33
We summarize research on diversity and trophic interactions under a trophic cascades model that is reframed and expanded from the traditional biomass- or abundance- based indirect effects and discuss the response of such “diversity cascades” to climate change and other global change parameters. The studies we summarize encompass dynamic processes in which species richness or evenness in one trophic level indirectly affects or is affected by changes in a non-adjacent level. The diversity cascade ...
7 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jul 1, 2013in Ecology of Freshwater Fish 1.83
Andreas Luek6
Estimated H-index: 6
(University of Lethbridge),
George E. Morgan11
Estimated H-index: 11
(Laurentian University)
+ 2 AuthorsCharles W. Ramcharan15
Estimated H-index: 15
(Laurentian University)
Fish communities may increase in biomass and productivity due to energy subsidies from the littoral invertebrate community. In lakes recovering from acidification and metal contamination, such as those in Sudbury, Ontario, Canada, impaired benthic invertebrate communities (i.e., low diversity with higher abundance of small-bodied taxa) allowed a critical test of the role of these littoral pathways on fish diet. We compared fish abundance, diversity, diet and biomass in eight recovering and eight...
13 Citations Source Cite
Published on Feb 1, 2013in Journal of Insect Conservation 1.56
Attila Torma5
Estimated H-index: 5
(University of Szeged),
Péter Császár3
Estimated H-index: 3
(University of Szeged)
River basins are among the most threatened ecosystems. The species diversity of several European river basins decreased seriously during the last decade due to loss of habitats and increasing land use pressure on the remaining habitats. We studied true bug assemblages in various land use types of grassland fragments and dikes as linear grassland habitats in the agricultural landscape of the lower reach of the Tisza River Basin. We tested the effects of the recorded variables of habitat quality, ...
11 Citations Source Cite