Plant and insect diversity along a pollution gradient: understanding species richness across trophic levels

Published on Sep 1, 2001in Biodiversity and Conservation 2.83
· DOI :10.1023/A:1011815325503
Martin Brändle23
Estimated H-index: 23
,
Uwe Amarell1
Estimated H-index: 1
+ 2 AuthorsRoland Brandl47
Estimated H-index: 47
Abstract
We analysed species richness of plants and true bugs (Insecta, Heteroptera) along a pollution gradient in Scots pine stands in Central Germany. As a consequence of particulate deposition, pH-values of soils increased in the vicinity of the emission source. Therefore, emission increased productivity. Species richness of plants increased with decreasing distance from emission source, and thus with increasing productivity. Similarly, species richness of herbivorous Heteroptera increased with decreasing distance from emission source, whereas, surprisingly, abundance decreased. The proportion of specialised herbivorous bug species is largest in the vicinity of the emission source. Thus, the diversity pattern of herbivores may be explained by the ‘specialisation hypothesis’ and not the ‘consumer rarity hypothesis’. Species richness and abundance of carnivorous Heteroptera showed no significant trend along the gradient. Overall our data favour the ‘bottom-up’ control of species diversity in the analysed system.
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  • Citations (27)
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References34
Published on Aug 1, 1999in Ecography 4.52
Evan Siemann37
Estimated H-index: 37
(Rice University),
John Haarstad11
Estimated H-index: 11
(Rice University),
David Tilman131
Estimated H-index: 131
(Rice University)
The successional dynamics of arthropod diversity in 18 abandoned agricultural fields (age 15-54 yr) at Cedar Creek, MN, USA were determined using sweep net sampling (44833 individuals of 618 species). Total arthropod species richness and equitability (J), but not abundance, increased significantly with field successional age. Herbivore and parasite species richness, but not detritivore and predator species richness, also increased significantly with field age. All of these arthropod variables we...
88 Citations Source Cite
Published on Apr 1, 1989in Plant and Soil 3.31
T. Persson2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences)
Addition of single species of soil animals to animal-free microcosms often increases total heterotrophic respiration, but sometimes additions of microarthropods have been reported not to increase or even decrease CO2 evolution rates. Most studies indicate that addition of soil animals increases net N mineralisation. In a study with F/H layer materials from a spruce stand in central Sweden kept at two temperatures (5 and 15°C) and three moisture levels (15, 30 and 60% of WHC), addition of a mixed...
75 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jul 1, 1993in Environmental Reviews 3.33
Peter J. Smallidge8
Estimated H-index: 8
,
Anthony R. Brach6
Estimated H-index: 6
,
Irene R. Mackun1
Estimated H-index: 1
Watershed liming has been proposed to mitigate lake acidification and depletion of soil base cations. This paper reviews and synthesizes literature describing the effects of liming on natural terrestrial ecosystems, with a specific emphasis on watershed liming studies. Specifically, we look at the purpose of liming, types of lime, physiological role of calcium, lime effects on soil and belowground processes, and plant response to liming with special attention to growth and tissue chemistry, root...
21 Citations Source Cite
Published on Nov 1, 1993in Forest Ecology and Management 3.17
R.F. Huettl1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
H.W. Zoettl1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Freiburg)
Abstract The so-called new types of forest damage in Germany are frequently related to ‘acid rain’ and enhanced atmospheric N deposition resulting in accelerated soil acidification and induced nutritional disturbances. To stop or reverse these effects liming is seen as an important mitigation tool. As forest liming is not new in Germany, the analysis of older liming trials indicated that liming generally leads to a long-term decrease of soil acidity, improvement of cation exchange capacity, base...
82 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 1988
Anne E. Magurran55
Estimated H-index: 55
Definitions of diversity. Measuring species diversity. Choosing an index and interpreting diversity measures. Sampling problems. Structural diversity. Applications of diversity measures. Summary.
8,092 Citations
Published on Jan 1, 1988in Plant Ecology 1.76
Randall J. Schaetzl28
Estimated H-index: 28
(Michigan State University),
Scott F. Burns4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Louisiana Tech University)
+ 1 AuthorsThomas W. Small6
Estimated H-index: 6
(Frostburg State University)
This paper reviews the ecological effects of tree uprooting. In many forests, disturbance by uprooting is the primary means of maintaining species richness and diversity. Treefall may be due to exogenous factors or it may be endogenously created, although the former predominate. The canopy gap formed by downed trees is often vital to community vegetation dynamics and successional pathways, by providing high light niches (gaps) for pioneer species, by encouraging release of suppressed, shade-tole...
183 Citations Source Cite
Published on Aug 1, 1981in The American Naturalist 4.26
Lauri Oksanen41
Estimated H-index: 41
,
Stephen D. Fretwell8
Estimated H-index: 8
+ 1 AuthorsPekka Niemela1
Estimated H-index: 1
Based on the assumption that each trophic level acts as a single exploitative population, a model relating the trophic structure of ecosystems to their potential primary productivity is developed. According to the model, herbivory pressure should be most severe in relatively unproductive environments. With increased potential productivity, the role of predation in herbivore regulation should become more important and the impact of herbivory upon plant communities should decrease. In very product...
1,305 Citations Source Cite
Published on Mar 1, 1999in Molecular Ecology 6.13
Barbara Neuffer21
Estimated H-index: 21
(University of Osnabrück),
Harald Auge26
Estimated H-index: 26
+ 2 AuthorsRoland Brandl47
Estimated H-index: 47
(University of Osnabrück)
Hybridization between plant species occurs frequently but hybrids are often restricted to ecotones or disturbed habitats. In this study we show that introgressive hybrids between the tetraploid Viola riviniana and the diploid V. reichenbachiana invaded pine forests of the Dubener Heide (central Germany), an area affected by calcareous pollutants. The spread of these violet populations was correlated with the impact of pollution on habitat conditions. We compared morphology, cytology and random a...
63 Citations Source Cite
Published on Apr 1, 1996in Journal of Ecology 5.17
Jari Oksanen31
Estimated H-index: 31
If plants vary in size, then the use of small quadrats of fixed size will show maximum species richness at intermediate biomass. Fewer plants are found in plots of fixed size both if plants increase in size (and biomass therefore increases), or if vegetation becomes sparse (biomass decreases).The supposed response of species richness to biomass is therefore produced as an artefact of varying plant number. Grime derived a humped relationship between species richness and biomass from studies using...
208 Citations Source Cite
Published on Sep 25, 1998in Science 41.06
A. Gonzalez1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Nottingham),
J. H. Lawton1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Nottingham)
+ 2 AuthorsI. Evans-Freke1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Nottingham)
The experimental fragmentation of landscapes of a natural ecosystem resulted in declines in the abundance and distribution of most species in the multispecies animal community inhabiting the landscapes and the extinction of many species. These declines caused the deterioration of the positive interspecific relation between local population abundance and distributional extent in this community. However, when patches were connected by habitat corridors, an immigration “rescue effect” arrested decl...
354 Citations Source Cite
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Published on Jul 1, 2009in Russian Journal of Ecology 0.44
A. V. Nesterkov2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Russian Academy of Sciences),
E. L. Vorobeichik7
Estimated H-index: 7
(Russian Academy of Sciences)
The aboveground phytomass of meadow plants and the density of chortobiont invertebrates in secondary upland meadows were estimated using a biocenometer in three areas differing in the level of pollution with emissions from the Middle Ural Copper Smelter (Revda, Sverdlovsk oblast) in 2006 and 2007. As the smelter is approached, the total amount of phytomass (dry weight) decreases by a factor of 1.3–1.9, with the proportion of grasses reaching 100%; the total abundance of invertebrates increases t...
10 Citations Source Cite
Published on Feb 1, 2013in Journal of Insect Conservation 1.56
Attila Torma4
Estimated H-index: 4
(University of Szeged),
Péter Császár3
Estimated H-index: 3
(University of Szeged)
River basins are among the most threatened ecosystems. The species diversity of several European river basins decreased seriously during the last decade due to loss of habitats and increasing land use pressure on the remaining habitats. We studied true bug assemblages in various land use types of grassland fragments and dikes as linear grassland habitats in the agricultural landscape of the lower reach of the Tisza River Basin. We tested the effects of the recorded variables of habitat quality, ...
11 Citations Source Cite
Published on May 1, 2008in Global Ecology and Biogeography 5.96
Elena L. Zvereva22
Estimated H-index: 22
(University of Turku),
Eija Toivonen6
Estimated H-index: 6
(University of Turku),
Mikhail V. Kozlov30
Estimated H-index: 30
(University of Turku)
Aim To investigate the general pattern of changes in species richness and diversity of vascular plants due to environmental contamination and associated habitat changes imposed by point polluters, and identify the sources of variation in the response of plant communities to industrial pollution. Location Global. Methods We collected species richness and diversity data from 86 studies that were conducted around 60 atmospheric point polluters worldwide and reported in 95 papers (published in 1953–...
51 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jul 1, 2012in Ecotoxicology 1.99
Sebatian Żmudzki1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Jagiellonian University),
Ryszard Laskowski27
Estimated H-index: 27
(Jagiellonian University)
The objective of the study was to determine whether long-term metal pollution affects communities of epigeal spiders (Aranea), studied at three taxonomic levels: species, genera, and families. Biodiversity was defined by three indices: the Hierarchical Richness Index (HRI), Margalef index (DM) and Pielou evenness index (J). In different ways the indices describe taxa richness and the distribution of individuals among taxa. The dominance pattern of the communities was described with four measures...
15 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jul 1, 2013in Ecology of Freshwater Fish 1.83
Andreas Luek6
Estimated H-index: 6
(University of Lethbridge),
George E. Morgan12
Estimated H-index: 12
(Laurentian University)
+ 2 AuthorsCharles W. Ramcharan15
Estimated H-index: 15
(Laurentian University)
Fish communities may increase in biomass and productivity due to energy subsidies from the littoral invertebrate community. In lakes recovering from acidification and metal contamination, such as those in Sudbury, Ontario, Canada, impaired benthic invertebrate communities (i.e., low diversity with higher abundance of small-bodied taxa) allowed a critical test of the role of these littoral pathways on fish diet. We compared fish abundance, diversity, diet and biomass in eight recovering and eight...
13 Citations Source Cite
Published on Apr 1, 2011in Oecologia 3.13
Mário Almeida-Neto18
Estimated H-index: 18
(University of Brasília),
Paulo Inácio Prado22
Estimated H-index: 22
(University of São Paulo),
Thomas M. Lewinsohn26
Estimated H-index: 26
(State University of Campinas)
The high dependence of herbivorous insects on their host plants implies that plant invaders can affect these insects directly, by not providing a suitable habitat, or indirectly, by altering host plant availability. In this study, we sampled Asteraceae flower heads in cerrado remnants with varying levels of exotic grass invasion to evaluate whether invasive grasses have a direct effect on herbivore richness independent of the current disturbance level and host plant richness. By classifying herb...
20 Citations Source Cite
Published on Dec 1, 2008in Biodiversity and Conservation 2.83
Martin Goßner9
Estimated H-index: 9
(Technische Universität München),
Kerstin Engel4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Technische Universität München),
Beate Jessel1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Technische Universität München)
Effect of site history on forest plant and insect communities was studied by comparing afforestations on former agricultural land with reafforestations on ancient woodland sites. Vascular plants, mosses, true bugs, lacewings and saproxylic beetles were surveyed at 18 young broadleaved forest sites dominated by oak (Quercus robur), established between 1986 and 1994 in three different growth regions in Bavaria, Germany. Two strata, near ground level and the canopy, were sampled. Compared to woodla...
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Published on May 1, 2008in Basic and Applied Ecology 2.14
Tim Diekötter26
Estimated H-index: 26
(École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne),
Regula Billeter21
Estimated H-index: 21
(École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne),
Thomas O. Crist44
Estimated H-index: 44
(Miami University)
Abstract European agricultural landscapes are mosaics of intensively cultivated areas and semi-natural elements. Although comprising only a small fraction of the total area, semi-natural elements provide habitat for most of the landscape biodiversity. Agricultural intensification has increasingly fragmented semi-natural elements and species numbers are in decline. Insights into the effects of landscape structure on species’ distributions within and among semi-natural habitats are needed to conse...
54 Citations Source Cite
Published on Sep 1, 2005in Comptes Rendus Palevol 1.43
Olivier Béthoux15
Estimated H-index: 15
(Yale University),
Francine Papier6
Estimated H-index: 6
,
André Nel84
Estimated H-index: 84
(Centre national de la recherche scientifique)
Abstract Assessing the insect evolution around the Permian/Triassic boundary faces various pitfalls. The taxonomic and phylogenetic frames are not consensually established, and diverse evidences suggest that the record is incomplete. Nevertheless, extensive studies in progress on the super-ordinal clades Archaeorthoptera and Odonatoptera reveal common trends. Several important lineages get extinct, and groups underrepresented or absent in Late Permian became major components of the entomofauna i...
21 Citations Source Cite
Published on Sep 9, 2014in PLOS ONE 2.77
Michael J. Raupach18
Estimated H-index: 18
,
Lars Hendrich17
Estimated H-index: 17
+ 3 AuthorsMartin M. Gossner23
Estimated H-index: 23
(Technische Universität München)
During the last few years, DNA barcoding has become an efficient method for the identification of species. In the case of insects, most published DNA barcoding studies focus on species of the Ephemeroptera, Trichoptera, Hymenoptera and especially Lepidoptera. In this study we test the efficiency of DNA barcoding for true bugs (Hemiptera: Heteroptera), an ecological and economical highly important as well as morphologically diverse insect taxon. As part of our study we analyzed DNA barcodes for 1...
42 Citations Source Cite