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Healthy lifestyle and life expectancy free of cancer, cardiovascular disease, and type 2 diabetes: prospective cohort study

Published on Jan 8, 2020in BMJ27.604
· DOI :10.1136/bmj.l6669
Yanping Li48
Estimated H-index: 48
(Harvard University),
Josje D. Schoufour14
Estimated H-index: 14
(Hogeschool van Amsterdam)
+ 15 AuthorsFrank B. Hu205
Estimated H-index: 205
(Harvard University)
Abstract
Abstract Objective To examine how a healthy lifestyle is related to life expectancy that is free from major chronic diseases. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting and participants The Nurses’ Health Study (1980-2014; n=73 196) and the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study (1986-2014; n=38 366). Main exposures Five low risk lifestyle factors: never smoking, body mass index 18.5-24.9, moderate to vigorous physical activity (≥30 minutes/day), moderate alcohol intake (women: 5-15 g/day; men 5-30 g/day), and a higher diet quality score (upper 40%). Main outcome Life expectancy free of diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and cancer. Results The life expectancy free of diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and cancer at age 50 was 23.7 years (95% confidence interval 22.6 to 24.7) for women who adopted no low risk lifestyle factors, in contrast to 34.4 years (33.1 to 35.5) for women who adopted four or five low risk factors. At age 50, the life expectancy free of any of these chronic diseases was 23.5 (22.3 to 24.7) years among men who adopted no low risk lifestyle factors and 31.1 (29.5 to 32.5) years in men who adopted four or five low risk lifestyle factors. For current male smokers who smoked heavily (≥15 cigarettes/day) or obese men and women (body mass index ≥30), their disease-free life expectancies accounted for the lowest proportion (≤75%) of total life expectancy at age 50. Conclusion Adherence to a healthy lifestyle at mid-life is associated with a longer life expectancy free of major chronic diseases.
  • References (43)
  • Citations (7)
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Summary Background Obesity increases the risk of several chronic diseases, but the extent to which the obesity-related loss of disease-free years varies by lifestyle category and across socioeconomic groups is unclear. We estimated the number of years free from major non-communicable diseases in adults who are overweight and obese, compared with those who are normal weight. Methods We pooled individual-level data on body-mass index (BMI) and non-communicable diseases from men and women with no i...
19 CitationsSource
#1Yanping Li (Harvard University)H-Index: 48
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Last. Frank B. Hu (Harvard University)H-Index: 205
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Background: Americans have a shorter life expectancy compared with residents of almost all other high-income countries. We aim to estimate the impact of lifestyle factors on premature mortality and...
44 CitationsSource
#1Hsi Yen (NCKU: National Cheng Kung University)H-Index: 2
#2Ashar Dhana (Harvard University)H-Index: 3
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Summary Nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) comprises mainly basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC). The association between alcohol intake and NMSC has been inconclusive; therefore the objective of this study is to quantify the relationship between alcohol intake and NMSC using meta-analyses. A systematic literature search of PubMed and Embase was performed on 30 October 2016. Eligible articles were case–control or cohort studies that examined alcohol intake and risk...
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Background Healthy life expectancy (HALE) and disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) provide summary measures of health across geographies and time that can inform assessments of epidemiological patterns and health system performance, help to prioritise investments in research and development, and monitor progress toward the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). We aimed to provide updated HALE and DALYs for geographies worldwide and evaluate how disease burden changes with development. Methods ...
492 CitationsSource
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Summary Background Healthy life expectancy (HALE) and disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) provide summary measures of health across geographies and time that can inform assessments of epidemiological patterns and health system performance, help to prioritise investments in research and development, and monitor progress toward the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). We aimed to provide updated HALE and DALYs for geographies worldwide and evaluate how disease burden changes with development. ...
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Background Behaviours such as smoking, poor diet, physical inactivity, and unhealthy alcohol consumption are leading risk factors for death. We assessed the Canadian burden attributable to these behaviours by developing, validating, and applying a multivariable predictive model for risk of all-cause death. Methods A predictive algorithm for 5 y risk of death—the Mortality Population Risk Tool (MPoRT)—was developed and validated using the 2001 to 2008 Canadian Community Health Surveys. There were...
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BACKGROUND: Smoking, physical inactivity and obesity are modifiable risk factors for morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to examine the extent to which the co-occurrence of these behaviour-related risk factors predict healthy life expectancy and chronic disease-free life expectancy in four European cohort studies. METHODS: Data were drawn from repeated waves of four cohort studies in England, Finland, France and Sweden. Smoking status, physical inactivity and obesity (body mass in...
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Summary Background Young people's health has emerged as a neglected yet pressing issue in global development. Changing patterns of young people's health have the potential to undermine future population health as well as global economic development unless timely and effective strategies are put into place. We report the past, present, and anticipated burden of disease in young people aged 10–24 years from 1990 to 2013 using data on mortality, disability, injuries, and health risk factors. Method...
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As emphasised by Li and colleagues, public policies for improving food are important in ensuring a disease-free life.1 The Food Safety and Standards Authority of India (FSSAI) is shaping the agenda …
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#1Angeline Chatelan (UNIL: University of Lausanne)H-Index: 5
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