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Parental substance use and child reward-driven eating behaviors.

Published on Jan 1, 2020in Appetite3.501
· DOI :10.1016/j.appet.2019.104486
Jenna R. Cummings (UM: University of Michigan), Jenna R. Cummings2
Estimated H-index: 2
(UM: University of Michigan)
+ 3 AuthorsAshley N. Gearhardt28
Estimated H-index: 28
(UM: University of Michigan)
Abstract
Abstract Family history of substance use is a well-established risk factor for greater substance use in adolescence and adulthood. The biological vulnerability hypothesis proposes that family history of substance use might also confer risk for obesogenic eating behavior because of similar rewarding characteristics between substances and certain foods (e.g., processed foods high in refined carbohydrates and fat). Indeed, preliminary research shows that family history of substance use is linked with sweet liking and obesity in adults; however, it is unknown whether this factor is linked to eating behavior earlier in development. The present study (n = 52) tested the association of severity of parental nicotine dependence and alcohol use (drinking frequency, drinking quantity, binge drinking, and number of annual drinks consumed) with two types of child [Mage = 10.18 (0.83) years] eating behavior: homeostatic eating behavior, or eating regulated by internal satiety cues, and reward-driven eating behavior, or eating motivated by pleasure. Results indicated that—over and above the influence of child age, child biological sex, and family income—more severe parental nicotine dependence and frequent and/or heavy, frequent parental alcohol use were associated with significantly greater child reward-driven eating behaviors as indexed by the Food Responsiveness and Enjoyment of Food subscales on the Child Eating Behavior Questionnaire. Parental substance use was not associated with child homeostatic eating behavior as indexed by the Satiety Responsiveness subscale. Family history of substance use may be an important transdiagnostic risk factor that identifies children at risk for obesogenic, reward-driven eating behaviors.
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Abstract Food consumption is driven not only by the need to obtain sufficient calories for survival, but to experience reward. The homeostatic and reward systems interact and are both important contributors to eating behavior. The role of reward in food consumption has evolutionary underpinnings and the mismatch between human biology and the modern food environment is a likely contributor to reward-driven eating. Wanting (i.e., motivation or drive to consume food), liking (i.e., pleasure experie...
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Seminal health behaviour theories and behaviour modification techniques are applied to health behaviours individually. Limited empirical work investigates how change in one health behaviour may change another. This study proposes a food-alcohol competition hypothesis, where individuals tend to consume one rewarding substance to the other's exclusion. In a large sample of adolescent girls assessed yearly from age 15 to 19, Latent Growth Modelling indicated that a tendency to consume processed or ...
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Abstract Background Given growing evidence of overlap in characteristics of addictive substances and highly processed foods (e.g., ice cream), transdiagnostic approaches may be appropriate. Prior work indicates youth with parents who use addictive substances are at risk for greater substance use. The current study tested hypotheses that parental substance use behaviors would prospectively predict greater youth highly processed food intake [but not minimally processed food intake (e.g., fruit)]. ...
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