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The impact of anticipating a stressful task on sleep inertia when on-call

Published on Jan 1, 2020in Applied Ergonomics2.61
· DOI :10.1016/J.APERGO.2019.102942
Katya Kovac2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Central Queensland University),
Grace E. Vincent11
Estimated H-index: 11
(Central Queensland University)
+ 4 AuthorsSally A. Ferguson28
Estimated H-index: 28
(Central Queensland University)
Abstract
Abstract Sleep inertia, the state of reduced alertness upon waking, can negatively impact on-call workers. Anticipation of a stressful task on sleep inertia, while on-call was investigated. Young, healthy males (n = 23) spent an adaptation, control and two counterbalanced on-call nights in the laboratory. When on-call, participants were told they would be woken to a high or low stress task. Participants were not woken during the night, instead were given a 2300-0700 sleep opportunity. Participants slept ∼7.5-h in all conditions. Upon waking, sleep inertia was quantified using the Karolinska Sleepiness Scale and Psychomotor Vigilance and Spatial Configuration Tasks, administered at 15-min intervals. Compared to control, participants felt sleepier post waking when on-call and sleepiest in the low stress compared to the high stress condition (p
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References67
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Abstract The effects on dehydration and cognitive performance from heat and/or physical activity are well established in the laboratory, although have not yet been studied for personnel working in occupations such as wildland firefighting regularly exposed to these types of conditions. This study aimed to investigate the effects of temperature and dehydration on seventy-three volunteer firefighters (35.7 ± 13.7 years, mean ± standard deviation) during a simulation of wildfire suppression under e...
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Abstract This study investigated how the chance of missing an alarm affects pre-bed anxiety, sleep and next day cognitive performance during on-call shifts. Participants (n = 24) completed one adaptation night, one control night and two on-call nights in a time-isolated sleep laboratory. On one of the on-call nights, participants were informed that they would be woken by a loud alarm that they would definitely not be able to sleep through (low chance of missing the alarm). On the other on-call n...
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On-call or stand-by is becoming an increasingly prevalent form of work scheduling. However, on-call arrangements are typically utilised when workloads are low, for example at night, which can result in inadequate sleep. It is a matter of concern that on-call work is associated with an increased risk of workplace injury. This study sought to determine the economic cost of injury due to inadequate sleep in Australian on-call workers. The prevalence of inadequate sleep among on-call workers was det...
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On-call work is becoming an increasingly common work pattern, yet the human impacts of this type of work are not well established. Given the likelihood of calls to occur outside regular work hours, it is important to consider the potential impact of working on-call on stress physiology and sleep. The aims of this review were to collate and evaluate evidence on the effects of working on-call from home on stress physiology and sleep. A systematic search of Ebsco Host, Embase, Web of Science, Scopu...
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#1Grace E. Vincent (Central Queensland University)H-Index: 11
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This study was designed to examine the effects of ambient heat on firefighters’ physical task performance, and physiological and perceptual responses when sleep restricted during simulated wildfire conditions. Thirty firefighters were randomly allocated to the sleep restricted (n = 17, SR; 19 °C, 4-h sleep opportunity) or hot and sleep restricted (n = 13, HOT + SR; 33 °C, 4-h sleep opportunity) condition. Firefighters performed two days of simulated, intermittent, self-paced work circuits compri...
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Cited By2
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When on-call workers wake during the night to perform work duties, they may experience reduced alertness and impaired performance as a result of sleep inertia. After performing their duties, on-call workers may have the opportunity to return to sleep. Thus, it is important that sleep inertia countermeasures do not affect subsequent sleep. Exercise may be a suitable countermeasure; however, the impact on subsequent sleep is untested. Healthy participants (n = 15) completed three conditions in a c...
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#1Grace E. VincentH-Index: 11
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On-call work arrangements are commonly utilised in the emergency services sector and are consistency associated with inadequate sleep. Despite sleep being a common shared behaviour, studies are yet to assess the impact of on-call work on the sleep of co-sleeping partners. This study aimed to investigate whether frequent 24/7 on-call work impacted the sleep and relationship happiness of firefighters’ partners. Two key research questions were investigated: (1) Does the frequency of calls impact sl...
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