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Psychotic-like experiences, polygenic risk scores for schizophrenia and structural properties of the salience, default mode and central-executive networks in healthy participants from UK Biobank

Published on Aug 9, 2019in bioRxiv
· DOI :10.1101/729921
Clara Alloza7
Estimated H-index: 7
(Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón),
Manuel Blesa-Cabez1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Edin.: University of Edinburgh)
+ 11 AuthorsStephen M. Lawrie55
Estimated H-index: 55
(Edin.: University of Edinburgh)
Abstract
Schizophrenia is a highly heritable disorder with considerable phenotypic heterogeneity. Hallmark psychotic symptoms can be considered as existing on a continuum from non-clinical to clinical populations. Assessing genetic risk and psychotic-like experiences (PLEs) in non-clinical populations and their associated neurobiological underpinnings can offer valuable insights into symptom-associated brain mechanisms without the potential confounds of the effects of schizophrenia and its treatment. We leveraged a large population-based cohort (UKBiobank) including information on PLEs, polygenic risk scores for schizophrenia (szPGRS) and multi-modal brain imaging in combination with network neuroscience. Morphometric (cortical thickness, volume) and water diffusion (fractional anisotropy) properties of the regions and pathways belonging to the salience, default-mode and central-executive networks were computed. We hypothesized that these anatomical concomitants of functional dysconnectivity would be negatively associated with szPGRS and PLEs. SzPGRS was associated with a latent measure of cortical thickness across the salience network (r = -0.069, p = 0.010) and with the right insular cortex (β = -0.046, pFDR = 0.050). Moreover, PLEs showed a number of significant positive and negative associations with morphometric properties of the salience and default mode networks (pFDR
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