Match!

Neurocognitive determinants of theory of mind across the adult lifespan

Published on Nov 1, 2019in Brain and Cognition2.619
· DOI :10.1016/j.bandc.2019.103588
Rémi Laillier1
Estimated H-index: 1
(PSL Research University),
Armelle Viard11
Estimated H-index: 11
(PSL Research University)
+ 6 AuthorsMickaël Laisney13
Estimated H-index: 13
(PSL Research University)
Abstract
Abstract Although theory of mind (ToM) has been extensively explored in aging, few studies have used the same tool to simultaneously assess and compare its cognitive and affective components. When we administered the Movie for Assessment of Social Cognition, a dynamic sequence of social scenes, to 60 healthy participants (20–75 years), we observed no different age-related decreases in both cognitive and affective ToM. While each component was associated with cognitive measures (i.e., episodic memory and processing speed were predictive of cognitive ToM, and recognition of facial emotion expressions and inhibition were predictive of affective ToM), mediation analyses showed that these measures only mediated the effect of age on affective ToM. Voxelwise regressions with grey-matter volume showed that the components partly rely on the same neural substrates, reflecting either ToM per se or other cognitive processes elicited by this multi-determinant task. We discuss the specific substrates of each ToM component, emphasising the importance of considering the impact of other aspects of cognition, present in more ecological situations, on ToM functioning.
  • References (87)
  • Citations (2)
📖 Papers frequently viewed together
115 Citations
78% of Scinapse members use related papers. After signing in, all features are FREE.
References87
Newest
#1Marcin A. Radecki (Edin.: University of Edinburgh)H-Index: 1
#2Simon R. CoxH-Index: 20
Last. Sarah E. MacPhersonH-Index: 19
view all 3 authors...
1 CitationsSource
#1Harmony Duclos (PSL Research University)H-Index: 2
#2Alexandre Bejanin (PSL Research University)H-Index: 11
Last. Mickaël Laisney (PSL Research University)H-Index: 13
view all 5 authors...
Abstract Affective theory of mind (ToM) is defined as the ability to deal with affective mental states. Attributing an affective mental state from a facial expression relies mainly on processes that allow information in the environment to be perceived and decoded. Reasoning processes are required when information is not directly available in the environment (e.g., when making an affective mental state attribution in a social situation where there is no visible facial expression of emotion). Alth...
1 CitationsSource
#1Harmony Duclos (PSL Research University)H-Index: 2
#2Béatrice Desgranges (PSL Research University)H-Index: 62
Last. Mickaël Laisney (PSL Research University)H-Index: 13
view all 4 authors...
Abstract Social cognition is impaired in a large number of neurological afflictions, including neurodegenerative diseases, neuropsychiatric disorders and neurodevelopmental syndromes, and has become a significant element in differential diagnoses. This report describes the different processes involved in social cognition and the way in which they work together to allow adapted behaviors. This is then followed by the numerous clinical symptoms of social behavioral disturbances and social cognitio...
1 CitationsSource
#1Yin Wang (TU: Temple University)H-Index: 9
#2Athanasia Metoki (TU: Temple University)H-Index: 4
Last. Ingrid R. Olson (TU: Temple University)H-Index: 41
view all 4 authors...
There is a growing consensus that social cognition and behavior emerge from interactions across distributed regions of the 9social brain9. Social neuroscience has traditionally focused its attention on functional response properties of these gray matter networks and neglected the vital role of white matter (WM) connections in establishing such networks and their functions. In this article, we conduct a comprehensive review of prior research on structural connectivity in social neuroscience (N=51...
3 CitationsSource
#1Laurence Chaby (Paris V: Paris Descartes University)H-Index: 10
#2Isabelle Hupont (CNRS: Centre national de la recherche scientifique)H-Index: 2
Last. Mohamed Chetouani (CNRS: Centre national de la recherche scientifique)H-Index: 24
view all 5 authors...
The identification of non-verbal emotional signals, and especially of facial expressions, is essential for successful social communication among humans. Previous research has reported an age-related decline in facial emotion identification, and argued for socio-emotional or aging-brain model explanations. However, more perceptual differences in the gaze strategies that accompany facial emotional processing with advancing age have been under-explored yet. In this study, 22 young (22.2 years) and ...
4 CitationsSource
#1Juliana Martins Pinto (State University of Campinas)H-Index: 4
#2Anita Liberaslesso (State University of Campinas)H-Index: 25
7 CitationsSource
#1Ashley L. Fischer (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 5
#2Norm O'Rourke (BGU: Ben-Gurion University of the Negev)H-Index: 25
Last. Wendy Loken Thornton (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 10
view all 3 authors...
Objectives:Theory of mind (ToM) allows us to detect and make inferences about cognitive and affective mental states. Mixed findings exist regarding (a) age differences in cognitive and affective ToM and (b) what mechanisms may underlie changes in the two components. We addressed these questions by examining the unique and joint contributions of neurocognitive performance, pulse pressure (PP), and biological sex to age differences in cognitive and affective ToM.Method:We tested 86 young and 85 ol...
10 CitationsSource
#1Maryam Ziaei (UQ: University of Queensland)H-Index: 7
#2Hana Burianová (Swansea University)H-Index: 13
Last. Julie D. Henry (UQ: University of Queensland)H-Index: 48
view all 6 authors...
Normal adult aging is associated with difficulties in processing social cues to emotions such as anger and also altered motivation to focus more on positive than negative information. Gaze direction is an important modifier of the social signals conveyed by an emotion, for example, an angry face looking directly at you is considerably more threatening than an angry face looking away. In the present study we tested the hypothesis that older adults would show less neural differentiation to angry f...
7 CitationsSource
#1Ross Wilkie (Keele University)H-Index: 23
Last. John McBethH-Index: 44
view all 6 authors...
AbstractIn older adults, reduced social participation increases the risk of poor health-related quality of life, increased levels of inflammatory markers and cardiovascular disease, and increased mortality. Older adults frequently present to primary care, which offers the potential to deliver interv
4 CitationsSource
#1Gillian Slessor (Aberd.: University of Aberdeen)H-Index: 12
#2Cristina Venturini (UNIPD: University of Padua)H-Index: 3
Last. Ailbhe N. Finnerty (Aberd.: University of Aberdeen)H-Index: 5
view all 6 authors...
Background. Eye-gaze following is a fundamental social skill, facilitating communication. The present series of studies explored adult age-related differences in this key social-cognitive ability.
10 CitationsSource
Cited By2
Newest
Source
Background: In view of the recent literature, the negative impact of traumatic brain injury (TBI) on social cognition remains a debated issue. On one hand, a considerable number of studies reported significant impairments in emotion recognition, empathy, moral reasoning, social problem solving, and mentalizing or theory of mind (ToM) abilities in patients with TBI. On the other hand, the ecological validity of social cognition tasks is still a matter of concern and debate for clinicians and rese...
Source
#1Brittany S. Cassidy (UNCG: University of North Carolina at Greensboro)H-Index: 1
#2Colleen HughesH-Index: 1
Last. Anne C. Krendl (IU: Indiana University Bloomington)H-Index: 12
view all 3 authors...
ABSTRACTMentalizing, or thinking about others’ mental states, shapes social interactions. Older adults (OA) have reduced mentalizing capacities reflected by lower medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) ac...
Source