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Published on May 2, 2017in Nature Communications11.88
Xing Xu41
Estimated H-index: 41
,
Philip J. Currie50
Estimated H-index: 50
+ 5 AuthorsCongyu Yu1
Estimated H-index: 1
Troodontids were theropod dinosaurs closely related to birds. Here, Xu and colleagues describe a new, feathered troodontid species, Jianianhualong tengi, dating from the Lower Cretaceous period in China that provides insight into troodontid mosaic evolution and paravian feathering.
Published on Jun 1, 2017in Biology Letters3.32
Phil R. Bell1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UNE: University of New England (United States)),
Nicolás E. Campione13
Estimated H-index: 13
(Uppsala University)
+ 4 AuthorsRobert T. Bakker2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Houston Museum of Natural Science)
Recent evidence for feathers in theropods has led to speculations that the largest tyrannosaurids, including Tyrannosaurus rex , were extensively feathered. We describe fossil integument from Tyrannosaurus and other tyrannosaurids ( Albertosaurus, Daspletosaurus, Gorgosaurus and Tarbosaurus ), confirming that these large-bodied forms possessed scaly, reptilian-like skin. Body size evolution in tyrannosauroids reveals two independent occurrences of gigantism; specifically, the large sizes in Yuty...
Published on Feb 24, 2017in Science41.04
Stephen L. Brusatte34
Estimated H-index: 34
(Edin.: University of Edinburgh)
The evolution of birds from a group of small dinosaurs between 170 million and 150 million years ago has emerged as a textbook example of a major evolutionary transformation in the fossil record ( 1 ). The attainment of powered flight—that is, active flapping that generates thrust—has been widely regarded, sometimes explicitly but often implicitly, as a long evolutionary march in which natural selection progressively refined one subgroup of dinosaurs into ever-better aerialists. However, recent ...
Published on Dec 1, 2016in Current Biology9.19
Lida Xing18
Estimated H-index: 18
(China University of Geosciences),
Ryan C. McKellar5
Estimated H-index: 5
(University of Regina)
+ 11 AuthorsAlexander P. Wolfe47
Estimated H-index: 47
(U of A: University of Alberta)
Summary In the two decades since the discovery of feathered dinosaurs [1–3], the range of plumage known from non-avialan theropods has expanded significantly, confirming several features predicted by developmentally informed models of feather evolution [4–10]. However, three-dimensional feather morphology and evolutionary patterns remain difficult to interpret, due to compression in sedimentary rocks [9, 11]. Recent discoveries in Cretaceous amber from Canada, France, Japan, Lebanon, Myanmar, an...
Published on Mar 1, 2016in Cretaceous Research2.12
Aaron J. van der Reest2
Estimated H-index: 2
(U of A: University of Alberta),
Alexander P. Wolfe47
Estimated H-index: 47
(U of A: University of Alberta),
Philip J. Currie50
Estimated H-index: 50
(U of A: University of Alberta)
Abstract A recently discovered articulated partial skeleton of Ornithomimus from the Upper Cretaceous Dinosaur Park Formation of Alberta, Canada is remarkable in the extent and quality of preservation of integumentary structures including feathers. It is the first ornithomimid to preserve a tail bearing extensive plumaceous feathers that are slightly more elongate in comparison to those present on the remainder of the body. However, the underside of the tail and the hind limb distal to the middl...
Published on Aug 1, 2015in Scientific Reports4.01
W. Scott Persons13
Estimated H-index: 13
,
Gregory F. Funston7
Estimated H-index: 7
+ 1 AuthorsMark A. Norell57
Estimated H-index: 57
As in all major vertebrate groups, dinosaurs must have included many species with gross anatomical traits that were sexually dimorphic. However, the identification of sexual dimorphism in dinosaurs is hindered by the limitations of an ancient fossil record, which restricts comparative sample size, degrades the quality of available specimens, and usually precludes the observation of non-osteological features. Among non-avian theropod dinosaurs, previous attempts to recognize sexual dimorphism hav...
Published on Apr 1, 2015in Evolution3.57
Walter S. Persons2
Estimated H-index: 2
(U of A: University of Alberta),
Philip J. Currie50
Estimated H-index: 50
(U of A: University of Alberta)
Over the course of the last two decades, the understanding of the early evolution of feathers in nonavian dinosaurs has been revolutionized. It is now recognized that early feathers had a simple form comparable in general structure to the hairs of mammals. Insight into the prevalence of simple feathers throughout the dinosaur family tree has gradually arisen in tandem with the growing evidence for endothermic dinosaur metabolisms. This has led to the generally accepted opinion that the early fea...
Published on Nov 1, 2014in Nature43.07
Yuong-Nam Lee14
Estimated H-index: 14
,
Rinchen Barsbold17
Estimated H-index: 17
+ 5 AuthorsTsogtbaatar Chinzorig6
Estimated H-index: 6
Two almost complete skeletons are presented for the theropod dinosaur Deinocheirus mirificus, revealing a humpbacked form with a duckbill-like skull.
Published on Jul 25, 2014in Science41.04
Pascal Godefroit20
Estimated H-index: 20
(Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences),
Sofia M. Sinitsa2
Estimated H-index: 2
+ 5 AuthorsPaul Spagna7
Estimated H-index: 7
(Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences)
Middle Jurassic to Early Cretaceous deposits from northeastern China have yielded varied theropod dinosaurs bearing feathers. Filamentous integumentary structures have also been described in ornithischian dinosaurs, but whether these filaments can be regarded as part of the evolutionary lineage toward feathers remains controversial. Here we describe a new basal neornithischian dinosaur from the Jurassic of Siberia with small scales around the distal hindlimb, larger imbricated scales around the ...
Published on Jun 1, 2013in Nature Communications11.88
Anusuya Chinsamy28
Estimated H-index: 28
,
Luis M. Chiappe45
Estimated H-index: 45
+ 2 AuthorsZhang Fengjiao2
Estimated H-index: 2
Hundreds of specimens of the beaked bird Confuciusornis sanctus have been recovered from Early Cretaceous lake deposits of northeastern China. These birds show remarkable variation in size and plumage, with some displaying two long, central ornamental rectrices (tail feathers) and others lacking them altogether. Although, traditionally specimens with ornamental rectrices were interpreted as males and those without them as females, this supposed sexual dimorphism has remained unconfirmed. Here we...
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