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Neural Response to Rewards, Stress and Sleep Interact to Prospectively Predict Depressive Symptoms in Adolescent Girls.

Published on Jul 22, 2019in Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology
· DOI :10.1080/15374416.2019.1630834
Kreshnik Burani3
Estimated H-index: 3
(FSU: Florida State University),
Julia Klawohn10
Estimated H-index: 10
(FSU: Florida State University)
+ 3 AuthorsGreg Hajcak71
Estimated H-index: 71
(FSU: Florida State University)
Abstract
Blunted reward processing both characterizes major depressive disorder and predicts increases in depressive symptoms. However, little is known about the interaction between blunted reward processin...
  • References (55)
  • Citations (5)
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References55
Newest
#1Lauren B. Alloy (TU: Temple University)H-Index: 69
#2Robin Nusslock (NU: Northwestern University)H-Index: 25
The idea that bipolar spectrum disorders (BSDs) are characterized by enhanced sensitivity to rewarding stimuli is at the core of the reward hypersensitivity model, one of the most prominent and well-supported theories of BSDs. In this article, we present the reward hypersensitivity model of BSDs, review evidence supporting it, discuss its relevance to explaining why BSDs typically begin and consolidate during the period of adolescence, and consider three major unresolved issues for this model th...
1 CitationsSource
#1Brittany C. Speed (SBU: Stony Brook University)H-Index: 6
#2Brady D. Nelson (SBU: Stony Brook University)H-Index: 20
Last. Greg Hajcak (FSU: Florida State University)H-Index: 71
view all 7 authors...
Abstract Affective personality traits, such as extraversion and neuroticism, are associated with individual differences in reward system functioning. The reward positivity (ΔRewP) is an event-related potential (ERP) component that indexes sensitivity to reward, and can be elicited by feedback indicating monetary gains relative to losses. In a sample of 508 adolescent girls, the current study examined the relationship between extraversion, neuroticism, and their respective facets and the ΔRewP. R...
2 CitationsSource
Objective:A role for aberrant reward processing in the pathogenesis of depression has long been proposed. However, no review has yet examined its role in depression by integrating conceptual and quantitative findings across functional MRI (fMRI) and EEG methodologies. The authors quantified these effects, with an emphasis on development.Method:A total of 38 fMRI and 12 EEG studies were entered into fMRI and EEG meta-analyses. fMRI studies primarily examined reward anticipation and reward feedbac...
20 CitationsSource
#1Amanda R. Levinson (SBU: Stony Brook University)H-Index: 7
#2Brittany C. Speed (SBU: Stony Brook University)H-Index: 6
Last. Greg Hajcak (SBU: Stony Brook University)H-Index: 71
view all 4 authors...
The ability to differentiate between rewards and losses is critical for motivated action, and aberrant reward and loss processing has been associated with psychopathology. The reward positivity (RewP) and feedback negativity (FN) are ERPs elicited by monetary gains and losses, respectively, and are promising individual difference measures. However, few studies have reported on the psychometric properties of the RewP and FN—crucial characteristics necessary for valid individual difference measure...
35 CitationsSource
#1Katherine R. Luking (SBU: Stony Brook University)H-Index: 13
#2Brady D. Nelson (SBU: Stony Brook University)H-Index: 20
Last. Greg Hajcak (SBU: Stony Brook University)H-Index: 71
view all 5 authors...
Abstract Background Abnormal neural response to reward is increasingly thought to function as a biological correlate of emerging psychopathology during adolescence. However, this view assumes that such responses have good psychometric properties, especially internal consistency—an assumption that is rarely tested. Methods Internal consistency (i.e., split-half reliability) was calculated for event-related potential (ERP) and blood oxygen level–dependent (BOLD) responses to monetary gain and loss...
21 CitationsSource
#1Andy C. Belden (WashU: Washington University in St. Louis)H-Index: 26
#2Kelsey Irvin (WashU: Washington University in St. Louis)H-Index: 1
Last. M Deanna (WashU: Washington University in St. Louis)H-Index: 82
view all 8 authors...
Objective Adults and adolescents with major depressive disorder (MDD) show a blunted neural response to rewards. Depression has been validated in children as young as age 3; however, it remains unclear whether blunted response to reward is also a core feature of preschool-onset depression. If so, this would provide further validation for the continuity of the neural correlates of depression across the life span and would identify a potential target for treatment in young children. Method Fifty-t...
26 CitationsSource
#1Brady D. NelsonH-Index: 20
#2Greg PerlmanH-Index: 14
Last. Greg HajcakH-Index: 71
view all 5 authors...
Objective:A blunted neural response to rewards has recently emerged as a potential mechanistic biomarker of adolescent depression. The reward positivity, an event-related potential elicited by feedback indicating monetary gain relative to loss, has been associated with risk for depression. The authors examined whether the reward positivity prospectively predicted the development of depression 18 months later in a large community sample of adolescent girls.Method:The sample included 444 girls 13....
57 CitationsSource
#1Khan R.L. CollinsH-Index: 4
#2Ida BestH-Index: 1
Last. Andrew PageH-Index: 61
view all 4 authors...
Suicide research can be enhanced by an ability to safely manipulate putative causal variables. The present studies developed an experimental task to modify risk factors identified by the interpersonal theory of suicide (perceived burdensomeness and thwarted belongingness) and examine their hypothesized suppressive effect on persistence in adversity in undergraduate university students. Variables that may moderate the impact of these risk factors on persistence (zest for life and mindful awarenes...
13 CitationsSource
#1Elaine M. Boland (UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)H-Index: 13
#2Jonathan P. Stange (TU: Temple University)H-Index: 20
Last. Lauren B. Alloy (TU: Temple University)H-Index: 69
view all 7 authors...
The behavioral approach system (BAS)/reward hypersensitivity theory and the social zeitgeber theory are two biopsychosocial theories of bipolar spectrum disorders (BSDs) that may work together to explain affective dysregulation. The present study examined whether BAS sensitivity is associated with affective symptoms via (a) increased social rhythm disruption in response to BAS-relevant life events or (b) greater exposure to BAS events leading to social rhythm disruption and subsequent symptoms. ...
8 CitationsSource
Background: Healthy first-degree relatives of patients with affective disorders are at increased risk for affective disorders and express discrete structural and functional abnormalities in the brain reward system. However, value-based decision making is not well understood in these at-risk individuals. Methods: We investigated healthy monozygotic and dizygotic twins with or without a co-twin history of affective disorders (high-risk and low-risk groups, respectively) using functional MRI during...
3 CitationsSource
Cited By5
Newest
#1Dylan M. Nielson (NIH: National Institutes of Health)H-Index: 8
#2Hanna Keren (NIH: National Institutes of Health)H-Index: 3
Last. Lisa S. Gorham (NIH: National Institutes of Health)
view all 13 authors...
Abstract Both human and animal studies support the relationship between depression and reward processing abnormalities, giving rise to the expectation that neural signals of these processes may serve as biomarkers or mechanistic treatment targets. Given the great promise of this research line, we scrutinize those findings and the theoretical claims that underlie them. To achieve this, we apply the framework provided by classical work on causality as well as contemporary approaches to prediction....
Source
#1Dylan M. Nielson (NIH: National Institutes of Health)H-Index: 8
#2Hanna Keren (NIH: National Institutes of Health)H-Index: 3
Last. Lisa S. Gorham (NIH: National Institutes of Health)
view all 13 authors...
Both human and animal studies support the relationship between depression and reward processing abnormalities, giving rise to the expectation that neural signals of these processes may serve as biomarkers or mechanistic treatment targets. Given the great promise of this research line, we scrutinize those findings and the theoretical claims that underlie them. To achieve this, we apply the framework provided by classical work on causality as well as contemporary approaches to prediction. We ident...
Source
#1Elaine M. Boland (UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)H-Index: 13
#2Jennifer R. Goldschmied (UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)H-Index: 2
Last. Philip R. Gehrman (UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)H-Index: 37
view all 5 authors...
Abstract Major depressive disorder with comorbid sleep disturbance has been associated with negative outcomes, including lower rates of treatment response and a greater likelihood of depressive relapse compared to those without sleep disturbance. However, little, if any, research has been conducted to understand why such negative treatment outcomes occur when sleep disturbance is present. In this conceptual review, we argue that the relationship of sleep disturbance and negative treatment outcom...
2 CitationsSource
#1Kreshnik Burani (FSU: Florida State University)H-Index: 3
#2Austin J. Gallyer (FSU: Florida State University)H-Index: 2
Last. Greg Hajcak (FSU: Florida State University)H-Index: 71
view all 6 authors...
Stress and blunted reward processing are risk factors for mood disorders, including Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). The experience of acute stress reduces fMRI correlates of reward-related neural activity; however, few studies have examined how acute stress impacts measures of reward derived from event-related potentials (ERPs). The current study examined the impact of an acute stressor on the Reward Positivity (RewP), an ERP that indexes reward sensitivity, in twenty-seven college students. Pa...
1 CitationsSource
#1Julia Klawohn (FSU: Florida State University)H-Index: 10
#2Kreshnik Burani (FSU: Florida State University)H-Index: 3
Last. Greg Hajcak (FSU: Florida State University)H-Index: 71
view all 5 authors...
BACKGROUND: Multiple studies have found a reduced reward positivity (RewP) among individuals with major depressive disorder (MDD). Event-related potential studies have also reported blunted neural responses to pleasant pictures in MDD as reflected by the late positive potential (LPP). These deficits have been interpreted broadly in terms of anhedonia and decreased emotional engagement characteristic of depression. METHODS: In the current study, a community-based sample of 83 participants with cu...
3 CitationsSource