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Published on Jan 1, 2019in American Journal of Political Science 4.35
BoudreauCheryl9
Estimated H-index: 9
(UC Davis: University of California, Davis),
Christopher S. Elmendorf5
Estimated H-index: 5
(UC Davis: University of California, Davis),
Scott A. MacKenzie5
Estimated H-index: 5
(UC Davis: University of California, Davis)
Published on Mar 1, 2015in Election Law Journal
BoudreauCheryl1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
S ElmendorfChristopher1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
A MacKenzieScott1
Estimated H-index: 1
Abstract Many legal scholars and political practitioners advocate using election law to increase voters' access to political information, either by providing such information directly on ballots or in ballot pamphlets. To date, however, little empirical evidence exists to guide policymakers and judges charged with weighing the benefits of such legal interventions against any costs they might impose. We address this gap by conducting survey experiments to examine three types of political informat...
Published on Oct 1, 2009in American Journal of Political Science 4.35
Kevin Arceneaux27
Estimated H-index: 27
(TU: Temple University),
Robin Kolodny11
Estimated H-index: 11
(TU: Temple University)
Theories of low-information rationality claim that uninformed voters can compensate for their lack of political knowledge by employing heuristics, such as interest group endorsements, to make voting decisions as if they were fully informed. Critics of low-information rationality contend that politically unaware voters are unlikely to use group endorsements effectively as a heuristic since they are unlikely to know the political relevance of interest groups. We address this debate by entertaining...
Published on Jul 1, 2009in The Journal of Politics 2.49
BoudreauCheryl9
Estimated H-index: 9
(UC Davis: University of California, Davis)
Relatively few scholars assess the conditions under which cues improve citizens’ decisions. I analyze experimentally the conditions under which one cue (the statements of an endorser) enables both sophisticated and unsophisticated citizens to improve their decisions. My results demonstrate that the effectiveness of this cue depends upon the endorser’s incentives and citizens’ levels of sophistication. Specifically, I find that under idealized conditions (i.e., when the endorser always has an inc...
Published on Mar 1, 2009in Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience 3.66
BoudreauCheryl9
Estimated H-index: 9
(UCSD: University of California, San Diego),
Mathew D. McCubbins34
Estimated H-index: 34
(UCSD: University of California, San Diego),
Seana Coulson27
Estimated H-index: 27
(UCSD: University of California, San Diego)
To address the neurocognitive mechanisms that underlie choices made after receiving information from an anonymous individual, reaction times (Experiment 1) and event-related brain potentials (Experiment 2) were recorded as participants played three variants of the coin toss game. In this game, participants guess the outcomes of unseen coin tosses after a person in another room (dubbed ’the reporter’) observes the coin toss outcomes and then sends reports (which may or may not be truthful) to par...
Published on Jun 1, 2006in Political Research Quarterly 1.58
L McDermottMonika12
Estimated H-index: 12
Endorsements by groups in American politics have typically been studied as voting cues only for members of the given organization. Using both the formal theoretical and low-information cognitive voting literatures, this article argues for a broader electoral role for group endorsements. Specifically, if groups that have clear ideological or policy preferences endorse candidates, these endorsements should provide all voters with ideological or issue information about the endorsed candidates. This...
Published on Jun 1, 2005in Political Behavior 2.53
D KamCindy22
Estimated H-index: 22
(UC Davis: University of California, Davis)
This article explores individual differences in citizens’ reliance on cues and values in political thinking. It uses experimental evidence to identify which citizens are likely to engage in heuristic processing and which citizens are likely to engage in systematic processing in developing opinions about a novel issue. The evidence suggests that political awareness crisply distinguishes between heuristic and systematic processors. The less politically aware rely on party cues and not on an issue-...
Published on Nov 1, 2001in The Journal of Politics 2.49
James N. Druckman43
Estimated H-index: 43
(UMN: University of Minnesota)
Public opinion often depends on which frames elites choose to use. For example, citizens' opinions about a Ku Klux Klan rally may depend on whether elites frame it as a free speech issue or a public safety issue. An important concern is that elites face few constraints to using frames to influence and manipulate citizens' opinions. Indeed, virtually no work has investigated the limits of framing effects. In this article, I explore these limits by focusing on one particular constraint-the credibi...
Published on Oct 1, 2001in American Journal of Political Science 4.35
R LauRichard35
Estimated H-index: 35
(RU: Rutgers University),
David P. Redlawsk18
Estimated H-index: 18
This article challenges the often un- tested assumption that cognitive "heuristics" improve the decision- making abilities of everyday voters. The potential benefits and costs of five common political heuristics are discussed. A new dynamic process- tracing methodology is employed to directly observe the use of these five heuristics by voters in a mock presi- dential election campaign. We find that cognitive heuristics are at times employed by almost all voters and that they are particularly lik...
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