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A new subfamily of hide beetles from the Cretaceous of northern Myanmar (Coleoptera: Scarabaeoidea: Trogidae)

Published on Jul 15, 2019in Historical Biology 1.25
· DOI :10.1080/08912963.2019.1641705
Abstract
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Published on Feb 28, 2019in Performance Evaluation 1.79
Andrew J. Ross17
Estimated H-index: 17
(National Museum of Scotland)
A list of all known taxa described or recorded from Burmese amber from the published literature up to the end of 2018 is given, along with a comprehensive bibliography. The history of the study of inclusions is summarised, and demonstrates that the number of species has risen exponentially over the past two decades. The first three species were named in 1916 and by the end of 1920 a total of 42 species had been named by T.D.A. Cockerell. Only three more species were named by 1999 though by the e...
4 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 16, 2019
Chenyang Cai13
Estimated H-index: 13
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences),
John F. Lawrence21
Estimated H-index: 21
(CSIRO: Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation)
+ 6 AuthorsMichael S. Engel36
Estimated H-index: 36
(KU: University of Kansas)
The origin and early evolutionary history of polyphagan beetles have been largely based on evidence from the derived and diverse ‘core Polyphaga’, whereas little is known about the species-poor basal polyphagan lineages, which include Scirtoidea (Clambidae, Decliniidae, Eucinetidae, and Scirtidae) and Derodontidae. Here, we report two new species Acalyptomerus thayerae sp. nov. and Sphaerothorax uenoi sp. nov., both belonging to extant genera of Clambidae, from mid-Cretaceous Burmese amber. Acal...
1 Citations Source Cite
Published on Dec 28, 2018in Performance Evaluation 1.79
Yingyan Mao1
Estimated H-index: 1
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences),
Kun Liang1
Estimated H-index: 1
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
+ 7 AuthorsDiying Huang18
Estimated H-index: 18
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
Burmese amber represents the world’s most diverse biota in the Mesozoic. Previous studies have focused on the biodiversity of its inclusions, as well as pholadid borings. Here we report a variety of marine animals symbiotic with or adhere to Burmese amber or the amber deposits, including crinoid columns, corals and oysters. We propose that there is no distinct evidence indicating the secondary transportation of Burmese amber over long distances. The ancient sedimentary environment was likely loc...
4 Citations Source Cite
Published on Sep 1, 2018in Current Biology 9.25
Chenyang Cai13
Estimated H-index: 13
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences),
Hermes E. Escalona3
Estimated H-index: 3
(CSIRO: Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation)
+ 3 AuthorsMichael S. Engel36
Estimated H-index: 36
(KU: University of Kansas)
Summary Cycads, unlike modern wind-pollinated conifers and Ginkgo , are unusual in that they are an ancient group of gymnosperms pollinated by insects [1–3]. Although it is well documented that cycads were diverse and abundant during the mid-Mesozoic, little is known about their biogeography and pollination before the rise of angiosperms. Direct fossil evidence illuminating the evolutionary history of cycads is extremely rare [4, 5]. Here we report a specialized beetle-mediated pollination mode ...
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Published on Apr 1, 2018in Cretaceous Research 1.93
Zi-Wei Yin5
Estimated H-index: 5
(SHNU: Shanghai Normal University),
Chenyang Cai13
Estimated H-index: 13
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences),
Diying Huang18
Estimated H-index: 18
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
The tribe Scydmaenini represents one of the most successful modern groups of the ant-like stone beetles (Scydmaeninae), displaying a high degree of species diversity (>750 species) and morphological disparity. Surprisingly, direct fossil evidence crucial for elucidating the origin and early evolution of Scydmaenini is lacking. This gap of knowledge is of particular interest as the Cretaceous origin of other major scydmaenine lineages, e.g. , Mastigini, Eutheiini, Cephenniini, and Glandulariini, ...
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Published on Mar 9, 2018in Historical Biology 1.25
George Poinar26
Estimated H-index: 26
(OSU: Oregon State University)
AbstractBurmese amber is an extremely important source of mid-Cretaceous plant and animal remains with over 870 species of organisms, ranging from protozoa to vertebrates, described from this source. The amber mines are located on the West Burma Block that according to geologists was originally part of Gondwana. The present study introduces some angiosperms and insects in Burmese amber whose closest extant relatives have a Gondwanan distribution and there is no previous evidence of a Laurasian d...
14 Citations Source Cite
Published on Dec 1, 2017in Nature Communications 12.35
Enrique Peñalver17
Estimated H-index: 17
(Instituto Geológico y Minero de España),
Antonio Arillo15
Estimated H-index: 15
(Complutense University of Madrid)
+ 5 AuthorsRicardo Pérez-de la Fuente10
Estimated H-index: 10
(University of Oxford)
Ticks are currently among the most prevalent blood-feeding ectoparasites, but their feeding habits and hosts in deep time have long remained speculative. Here, we report direct and indirect evidence in 99 million-year-old Cretaceous amber showing that hard ticks and ticks of the extinct new family Deinocrotonidae fed on blood from feathered dinosaurs, non-avialan or avialan excluding crown-group birds. A †Cornupalpatum burmanicum hard tick is entangled in a pennaceous feather. Two deinocrotonids...
16 Citations Source Cite
Published on Oct 1, 2017in Cretaceous Research 1.93
Chenyang Cai13
Estimated H-index: 13
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences),
Diying Huang18
Estimated H-index: 18
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
Abstract Mesozoic leiodids are poorly known, and only one definitive leiodid is formally described from Burmese amber. Here we describe and illustrate the second definitive Mesozoic leiodid, Cretagyrtodes glabratus gen. et sp. nov., based on a single specimen from the Upper Cretaceous Burmese amber. The fossil is placed in Agyrtodini (subfamily Camiarinae) after maxillary palpomere 4 as wide as palpomere 3, and procoxal cavities closed behind. Cretagyrtodes is tentatively attributed to the extan...
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Published on Sep 1, 2017in Gondwana Research 5.66
Lida Xing18
Estimated H-index: 18
(China University of Geosciences),
Jingmai K. O'Connor22
Estimated H-index: 22
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
+ 4 AuthorsMing Bai15
Estimated H-index: 15
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
Abstract Burmese amber has recently provided some detailed glimpses of plumage, soft tissues, and osteology of juvenile enantiornithine birds, but these insights have been restricted to isolated wing apices. Here we describe nearly half of a hatchling individual, based on osteological and soft tissue data obtained from the skull, neck, feet, and wing, and identified as a member of the extinct avian clade Enantiornithes. Preserved soft tissue provides the unique opportunity to observe the externa...
19 Citations Source Cite
Published on Dec 1, 2016in Current Biology 9.25
Lida Xing18
Estimated H-index: 18
(China University of Geosciences),
Ryan C. McKellar5
Estimated H-index: 5
(University of Regina)
+ 11 AuthorsAlexander P. Wolfe47
Estimated H-index: 47
(U of A: University of Alberta)
Summary In the two decades since the discovery of feathered dinosaurs [1–3], the range of plumage known from non-avialan theropods has expanded significantly, confirming several features predicted by developmentally informed models of feather evolution [4–10]. However, three-dimensional feather morphology and evolutionary patterns remain difficult to interpret, due to compression in sedimentary rocks [9, 11]. Recent discoveries in Cretaceous amber from Canada, France, Japan, Lebanon, Myanmar, an...
32 Citations Source Cite
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