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Earliest behavioral mimicry and possible food begging in a Mesozoic alienopterid pollinator

Published on May 29, 2019in Biologia 0.73
· DOI :10.2478/s11756-019-00278-z
Jan Hinkelman (SAV: Slovak Academy of Sciences)
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Abstract
Morphological insect-insect mimicry is known from few Cretaceous cockroaches and a beetle. Formicamendax vrsanskyi gen. et sp. n. (Blattaria, Alienopteridae) shows myrmecomorph features such as an elongated, smooth and black body, simple fenestrated hindwing, legs lacking protective spines. Elbowed or “geniculate “antenna is a typical character of advanced ants and weevils used for different forms of communication. Together with reduced mouthparts and specialized palps still preserved grasping food, they evidence specialized behavioral mimicry. The attached symmetric angiosperm pollen on hindleg can provide rare evidence of insect-flower relations.
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Published on Jul 1, 2019in Gondwana Research 6.48
Alexander V. Khramov4
Estimated H-index: 4
(RAS: Russian Academy of Sciences),
Elena D. Lukashevich6
Estimated H-index: 6
(RAS: Russian Academy of Sciences)
Abstract In the course of evolution, mutualism between pollinators and plants was likely first developed between insects and gymnosperms, since the occurrence of long-proboscid Mecoptera, Neuroptera and Diptera predates the diversification of flowering plants in the Early Cretaceous by at least 60 million years. Here we report one of the most advanced pre-angiosperm pollinator, the Late Jurassic acrocerid fly Archocyrtus kovalevi (Nartshuk, 1996). Re-examination of the holotype specimen has show...
1 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jul 1, 2019in Cretaceous Research 2.12
Lu Qiu3
Estimated H-index: 3
(SWU: Southwest University),
Zong-Qing Wang3
Estimated H-index: 3
(SWU: Southwest University),
Yan-Li Che3
Estimated H-index: 3
(SWU: Southwest University)
Abstract Blattulidae is an extinct cockroach family which was widely distributed around the world and lasted from Late Triassic to Cretaceous. Here we describe and illustrate the first blattulid genus found in the mid-Cretaceous Burmese amber, Huablattula gen. nov., to accommodate two new species, Huablattula hui sp. nov. and Huablattula jiewenae sp. nov. Most blattulid genera were only described based on inadequate samples, or were based only on nymphs, isolated tegmina, or wings. The well-pres...
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Published on Apr 1, 2019in Gondwana Research 6.48
Peter Vršanský10
Estimated H-index: 10
,
Hemen Sendi2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Comenius University in Bratislava)
+ 7 AuthorsThierry Garcia1
Estimated H-index: 1
(RAFAEL: Rafael Advanced Defense Systems)
Abstract Among insects, 236 families in 18 of 44 orders independently invaded water. We report living amphibiotic cockroaches from tropical streams of UNESCO BR Sumaco, Ecuador. We also describe the first fossil aquatic roach larvae (6 spp.; n = 44, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1) from the most diverse tropical Mesozoic sediments (Middle Jurassic Bakhar Fm in Mongolia, Kimmeridgian Karabastau Fm in Kazakhstan; Aptian Crato Fm in Brazil), and the Barremian Lebanese and Cenomanian Myanmar ambers. Tropic-limited oc...
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Published on Apr 1, 2019in Cretaceous Research 2.12
Lu Qiu3
Estimated H-index: 3
(SWU: Southwest University),
Zong-Qing Wang3
Estimated H-index: 3
(SWU: Southwest University),
Yan-Li Che3
Estimated H-index: 3
(SWU: Southwest University)
Abstract A new corydiid cockroach, Magniocula apiculata gen. et sp. nov., is described and illustrated based on a well-preserved specimen in Upper Cretaceous Burmese amber. Magniocula is placed in the extant subfamily Euthyrrhaphinae based on the small pubescent body, large clypeus surpassing the distal border of the antennal sockets, and two spines at apex of the front femur. However, this new genus is unique among Euthyrrhaphinae for its holoptic eyes. This is the second corydiid species found...
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Published on Mar 19, 2019in Journal of Systematic Palaeontology 2.31
Petr Kočárek12
Estimated H-index: 12
(University of Ostrava)
Alienoptera have been recently described from mid-Cretaceous amber and are nested phylogenetically inside the Dictyoptera lineage as the sister group of Mantodea. The second known species, Alienopterella stigmatica gen. et sp. nov., is described and illustrated in this contribution based on a male embedded in Cretaceous Burmese amber of earliest Cenomanian age. The well-preserved holotype allows clarification of the characteristics of the order. The first-studied hind wings are derived from the ...
5 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 2019in Biologia 0.73
Peter Vršanský1
Estimated H-index: 1
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences),
Lucia Šmídová3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Charles University in Prague)
+ 14 AuthorsDany Azar6
Estimated H-index: 6
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
Myrmecophilous and termitophilous interactions likely contributed to the competitive advantage and evolutionary success of eusocial insects, but how these commensal and parasitic relationships originated is unclear due to absence of fossil records. New extinct cockroaches of the still living family Blattidae are reported here from the Cretaceous Myanmar amber (99 Ma) and are the earliest known inhabitants of complex ant nests, demonstrating that this specialised myrmecophily originated shortly a...
3 Citations Source Cite
Published on Dec 20, 2018in Diversity
Dave J. Clarke3
Estimated H-index: 3
,
Ajay Limaye1
Estimated H-index: 1
+ 1 AuthorsRolf G. Oberprieler11
Estimated H-index: 11
Only a few weevils have been described from Burmese amber, and although most have been misclassified, they show unusual and specialised characters unknown in extant weevils. In this paper, we present the results of a study of a much larger and more diverse selection of Burmese amber weevils. We prepared all amber blocks to maximise visibility of structures and examined these with high-magnification light microscopy as well as CT scanning (selected specimens). We redescribe most previously descri...
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Published on Dec 1, 2018in Scientific Reports 4.01
Ricardo Pérez-de la Fuente10
Estimated H-index: 10
(University of Oxford),
Enrique Peñalver17
Estimated H-index: 17
(Instituto Geológico y Minero de España)
+ 1 AuthorsMichael S. Engel36
Estimated H-index: 36
(AMNH: American Museum of Natural History)
Diverse organisms protect and camouflage themselves using varied materials from their environment. This adaptation and associated behaviours (debris-carrying) are well known in modern green lacewing larvae (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae), mostly due to the widespread use of these immature insects in pest control. However, the evolutionary history of this successful strategy and related morphological adaptations in the lineage are still far from being understood. Here we describe a novel green lacewing...
1 Citations Source Cite
Published on Dec 1, 2018in Cretaceous Research 2.12
Xin-Ran Li2
Estimated H-index: 2
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences),
Diying Huang18
Estimated H-index: 18
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
Abstract Here we describe a new corydiid cockroach, Nodosigalea burmanica gen. et sp. nov., from the middle Cretaceous Burmese amber. The well-preserved specimens exhibit a typical habitus of Corydiidae, and are characterized by nodulous pronotum, distinct wing venation and unique tarsi, the hind ones of which have different ventral structures from the fore- and midlegs. The combination of adhesive fore- and midtarsi and propulsive hindtarsi suggests a particular life style of the new genus. The...
8 Citations Source Cite
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