Match!

Reward processing and future life stress: Stress generation pathway to depression.

Published on May 1, 2019in Journal of Abnormal Psychology
· DOI :10.1037/ABN0000427
Daniel M. Mackin2
Estimated H-index: 2
(SBU: Stony Brook University),
Roman Kotov41
Estimated H-index: 41
(SBU: Stony Brook University)
+ 4 AuthorsDaniel N. Klein77
Estimated H-index: 77
(SBU: Stony Brook University)
Abstract
: Blunted reward sensitivity and life stress are each depressogenic. Additionally, individuals with clinical and psychosocial vulnerabilities are prone to experience or evoke dependent life stressors (e.g., interpersonal conflict) that, in turn, increase depression risk. However, no previous study has investigated the role of neural vulnerability factors in generating life stress. Therefore, the current study investigated whether a neural measure of reward sensitivity prospectively predicts the generation of life stress, which in turn mediates effects of these neural processes on subsequent depression. Participants were 467 never-depressed adolescent girls. Using event-related potentials, neural sensitivity to the difference between monetary reward and loss (the Reward Positivity [RewP]) was assessed at baseline. Negative life events were assessed twice via interview over the ensuing 18 months, yielding an index of total life stress over the follow-up period. A self-report dimensional measure of depression symptoms was administered at baseline and follow-up. After accounting for baseline age, depression, and race, a blunted RewP predicted greater dependent, but not independent, life stress over the follow-up. Mediation analyses revealed a significant indirect effect of the RewP on follow-up depression through dependent, but not independent, life stress. Our results suggest that neural processing reward and loss plays a crucial role in depressogenic stress generation. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved).
  • References (0)
  • Citations (4)
📖 Papers frequently viewed together
6 Citations
17 Citations
20 Citations
78% of Scinapse members use related papers. After signing in, all features are FREE.
References0
Newest
Cited By4
Newest
#1Paige Ethridge (McGill University)H-Index: 4
#2Nida Ali (University of Vienna)H-Index: 1
Last. Anna Weinberg (McGill University)H-Index: 29
view all 5 authors...
Both abnormal stress and reward responsivity are consistently linked to multiple forms of psychopathology; however, the nature of the associations between stress and reward sensitivity remains poor...
1 CitationsSource
#1Dylan M. Nielson (NIH: National Institutes of Health)H-Index: 9
#2Hanna Keren (NIH: National Institutes of Health)H-Index: 3
Last. Lisa S. Gorham (NIH: National Institutes of Health)
view all 13 authors...
Abstract Both human and animal studies support the relationship between depression and reward processing abnormalities, giving rise to the expectation that neural signals of these processes may serve as biomarkers or mechanistic treatment targets. Given the great promise of this research line, we scrutinize those findings and the theoretical claims that underlie them. To achieve this, we apply the framework provided by classical work on causality as well as contemporary approaches to prediction....
Source
#1Eline J. Kraaijenvanger (Heidelberg University)H-Index: 1
#2Tania M. Pollok (Heidelberg University)H-Index: 1
Last. Nathalie E. Holz (Heidelberg University)H-Index: 11
view all 7 authors...
Abstract The detrimental impact of early life adversities (ELAs; entailing pre-and postnatal experiences) on the developing brain has been well established. By inducing neural alterations underlying critical human socio-cognitive functions, ELAs may embed latent vulnerability to psychopathologies. However, single neuroimaging studies report conflicting results. Therefore, this coordinate-based meta-analysis aims to identify convergent functional alterations following ELAs. Electronic databases w...
Source
#1Dylan M. Nielson (NIH: National Institutes of Health)H-Index: 9
#2Hanna Keren (NIH: National Institutes of Health)H-Index: 3
Last. Lisa S. Gorham (NIH: National Institutes of Health)
view all 13 authors...
Both human and animal studies support the relationship between depression and reward processing abnormalities, giving rise to the expectation that neural signals of these processes may serve as biomarkers or mechanistic treatment targets. Given the great promise of this research line, we scrutinize those findings and the theoretical claims that underlie them. To achieve this, we apply the framework provided by classical work on causality as well as contemporary approaches to prediction. We ident...
Source