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Sitting Time, Physical Activity, and Risk of Mortality in Adults

Published on Apr 1, 2019in Journal of the American College of Cardiology18.64
· DOI :10.1016/j.jacc.2019.02.031
Emmanuel Stamatakis62
Estimated H-index: 62
(USYD: University of Sydney),
Joanne Gale7
Estimated H-index: 7
(USYD: University of Sydney)
+ 3 AuthorsDing Ding26
Estimated H-index: 26
(USYD: University of Sydney)
Cite
Abstract
Abstract Background It is unclear what level of moderate to vigorous intensity physical activity (MVPA) offsets the health risks of sitting. Objectives The purpose of this study was to examine the joint and stratified associations of sitting and MVPA with all-cause and cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality, and to estimate the theoretical effect of replacing sitting time with physical activity, standing, and sleep. Methods A longitudinal analysis of the 45 and Up Study calculated the multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) of sitting for each sitting-MVPA combination group and within MVPA strata. Isotemporal substitution modeling estimated the per-hour HR effects of replacing sitting. Results A total of 8,689 deaths (1,644 due to CVD) occurred among 149,077 participants over an 8.9-year (median) follow-up. There was a statistically significant interaction between sitting and MVPA only for all-cause mortality. Sitting time was associated with both mortality outcomes in a nearly dose-response manner in the least active groups reporting  8 h/day) to the least sedentary ( 6 sitting h/day) where, for example, the per-hour CVD mortality HR for sitting replaced with vigorous activity was 0.36 (95% confidence interval: 0.17 to 0.74). Conclusions Sitting is associated with all-cause and CVD mortality risk among the least physically active adults; moderate-to-vigorous physical activity doses equivalent to meeting the current recommendations attenuate or effectively eliminate such associations.
  • References (32)
  • Citations (5)
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References32
Newest
Published on Jul 10, 2018in British Journal of Sports Medicine11.64
Ulf Ekelund78
Estimated H-index: 78
,
Wendy J. Brown66
Estimated H-index: 66
(UQ: University of Queensland)
+ 5 AuthorsI-Min Lee95
Estimated H-index: 95
Objective To examine whether the associations between sedentary behaviours (ie, daily sitting/TV-viewing time) and mortality from cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cancer differ by different levels of physical activity (PA). Design Harmonised meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies. Data on exposure variables were harmonised according to a predefined protocol and categorised into four groups for sedentary behaviours and into quartiles of PA (MET-hour/week). Data sources PubMed, PsycINFO, Emba...
Published on Mar 1, 2019in British Journal of Sports Medicine11.64
Emmanuel Stamatakis62
Estimated H-index: 62
(USYD: University of Sydney),
Ulf Ekelund78
Estimated H-index: 78
(Norwegian School of Sport Sciences)
+ 3 AuthorsI-Min Lee95
Estimated H-index: 95
Sedentary behaviour (SB) has been proposed as an ‘independent’ risk factor for chronic disease risk, attracting much research and media attention. Many countries have included generic, non-quantitative reductions in SB in their public health guidelines and calls for quantitative SB targets are increasing. The aim of this narrative review is to critically evaluate key evidence areas relating to the development of guidance on sitting for adults. We carried out a non-systematic narrative evidence s...
Published on Mar 1, 2019in British Journal of Sports Medicine11.64
Sebastien Chastin18
Estimated H-index: 18
,
Marieke De Craemer16
Estimated H-index: 16
(UGent: Ghent University)
+ 5 AuthorsEmmanuel Stamatakis62
Estimated H-index: 62
(USYD: University of Sydney)
Aim To assess the relationship between time spent in light physical activity and cardiometabolic health and mortality in adults. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis. Data sources Searches in Medline, Embase, PsycInfo, CINAHL and three rounds of hand searches. Eligibility criteria for selecting studies Experimental (including acute mechanistic studies and physical activity intervention programme) and observational studies (excluding case and case–control studies) conducted in adults (aged ...
Published on Nov 20, 2018in JAMA51.27
Katrina L. Piercy3
Estimated H-index: 3
(HHS: United States Department of Health and Human Services),
Richard P. Troiano1
Estimated H-index: 1
(HHS: United States Department of Health and Human Services)
+ 5 AuthorsRichard Olson2
Estimated H-index: 2
(HHS: United States Department of Health and Human Services)
Importance Approximately 80% of US adults and adolescents are insufficiently active. Physical activity fosters normal growth and development and can make people feel, function, and sleep better and reduce risk of many chronic diseases. Objective To summarize key guidelines in the Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans , 2nd edition (PAG). Process and Evidence Synthesis The 2018 Physical Activity Guidelines Advisory Committee conducted a systematic review of the science supporting physical ac...
Published on Sep 1, 2018in European Journal of Epidemiology6.53
Richard Patterson2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Imperial College London),
Eoin McNamara1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Cambridge)
+ 7 AuthorsKatrien Wijndaele32
Estimated H-index: 32
(University of Cambridge)
Purpose: To estimate the strength and shape of the dose–response relationship between sedentary behaviour and all-cause, cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cancer mortality, and incident type 2 diabetes (T2D), adjusted for physical activity (PA). Data Sources: Pubmed, Web of Knowledge, Medline, Embase, Cochrane Library and Google Scholar (through September-2016); reference lists. Study Selection: Prospective studies reporting associations between total daily sedentary time or TV viewing time, and ...
Published on Jul 1, 2018in British Journal of Sports Medicine11.64
Urho M. Kujala62
Estimated H-index: 62
(University of Jyväskylä)
There are discrepant findings between (A) observational follow-ups and (B) interventional studies that investigate possible causal association between high physical activity and low mortality. Participation in vigorous physical activity at a specific time-point is an indicator of good fitness and health, and is associated with a reduced risk of death. However, neither randomised controlled trials nor experimental animal studies have provided conclusive evidence to show that physical activity sta...
Published on Dec 11, 2017in PeerJ2.35
Stephanie A. Prince10
Estimated H-index: 10
(U of O: University of Ottawa),
G LeBlancAllana23
Estimated H-index: 23
(U of O: University of Ottawa)
+ 1 AuthorsTravis J. Saunders8
Estimated H-index: 8
(UPEI: University of Prince Edward Island)
Binh Nguyen10
Estimated H-index: 10
(USYD: University of Sydney),
Adrian Bauman101
Estimated H-index: 101
(USYD: University of Sydney)
+ 3 AuthorsDing Ding26
Estimated H-index: 26
(USYD: University of Sydney)
Background There is growing evidence for a relationship between fruit and vegetable consumption and all-cause mortality. Few studies, however, specifically explored consuming raw versus cooked vegetables in relation to health and mortality outcomes. The purpose of this study was to examine the relation of all-cause mortality with: a) fruit and vegetable consumption, either combined or separately; b) the consumption of raw versus cooked vegetables in a large cohort of Australian middle-aged and o...
Published on Sep 27, 2016in Circulation23.05
Deborah Rohm Young1
Estimated H-index: 1
(WLAC: West Los Angeles College),
Marie-France Hivert36
Estimated H-index: 36
(Harvard University)
+ 8 AuthorsJuned Siddique29
Estimated H-index: 29
(NU: Northwestern University)
Epidemiological evidence is accumulating that indicates greater time spent in sedentary behavior is associated with all-cause and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in adults such that some countries have disseminated broad guidelines that recommend minimizing sedentary behaviors. Research examining the possible deleterious consequences of excess sedentary behavior is rapidly evolving, with the epidemiology-based literature ahead of potential biological mechanisms that might explain the obse...
Published on Sep 1, 2016in The Lancet59.10
Ulf Ekelund78
Estimated H-index: 78
(Norwegian School of Sport Sciences),
Jostein Steene-Johannessen21
Estimated H-index: 21
(Norwegian School of Sport Sciences)
+ 5 AuthorsI-Min Lee95
Estimated H-index: 95
(Harvard University)
Summary Background High amounts of sedentary behaviour have been associated with increased risks of several chronic conditions and mortality. However, it is unclear whether physical activity attenuates or even eliminates the detrimental effects of prolonged sitting. We examined the associations of sedentary behaviour and physical activity with all-cause mortality. Methods We did a systematic review, searching six databases (PubMed, PsycINFO, Embase, Web of Science, Sport Discus, and Scopus) from...
Cited By5
Newest
Published on Oct 1, 2019in Journal of Affective Disorders4.08
Jingkai Wei (UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill), Liyang Xie (UMD: University of Maryland, College Park)+ 2 AuthorsChangwei Li (UGA: University of Georgia)
Abstract Background : Late-life depression is a great burden of public health. Previous studies reported that physical activity is associated with reduced depressive symptoms among older adults, while the competing nature of physical activity and sedentary behaviors has been largely neglected in studies. We aimed to examine the associations of replacing sedentary behaviors with walking/bicycling or moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) with depressive symptoms in older adults. Methods : ...
Published on Sep 16, 2019in Sports Medicine7.58
Carlijn M. Maasakkers (Radboud University Nijmegen), Jurgen A.H.R. Claassen28
Estimated H-index: 28
(Radboud University Nijmegen)
+ 20 AuthorsNicolas Cherbuin32
Estimated H-index: 32
(ANU: Australian National University)
Background Besides physical activity as a target for dementia prevention, sedentary behaviour is hypothesized to be a potential target in its own right. The rising number of persons with dementia and lack of any effective treatment highlight the urgency to better understand these modifiable risk factors. Therefore, we aimed to investigate whether higher levels of sedentary behaviour are associated with reduced global cognitive functioning and slower cognitive decline in older persons without dem...
This study aimed to assess the effects of isotemporal replacement of sitting time (SIT) with standing (STA) on cardiometabolic biomarkers. In this cross-sectional study, male adolescents wore the GT3X+ activity monitor for 7 days to measure the SIT and STA. Moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) was estimated by a youth-specific cut-off point. An isotemporal substitution approach was used to examine the effects of replacing different periods of SIT (15, 30, 60, and 120 min) with STA on ca...
Stefano Gobbo , Valentina Bullo5
Estimated H-index: 5
+ 11 AuthorsManuele Bergamo
The aim of this systematic review was to analyze the effect of Nordic Walking (NW) on anthropometric parameters, body composition, cardiovascular parameters, aerobic capacity, blood sample, and glucose tolerance in overweight and obese subjects. The main keywords “Nordic Walking” or “Pole Walking”, associated with either “obese”, “obesity”, “overweight”, or “weight loss” were used on the online database MEDLINE, PubMed, SPORTDiscus and Scopus. Additionally, references of the studies included wer...
Published on Jun 11, 2019in Frontiers in Physiology3.20
Bryna C. R. Chrismas9
Estimated H-index: 9
(Qatar University),
Lee Taylor15
Estimated H-index: 15
(Lboro: Loughborough University)
+ 5 AuthorsDaniel Paul Bailey7
Estimated H-index: 7
(University of Bedfordshire)
Background: Cultural, environmental and logistical factors challenge the Qatari population, particularly females, to engage in physical activity, and there is a high prevalence of diabetes in this population. Sedentary behaviour is associated with increased cardiometabolic disease risk and early mortality and breaking up sitting can attenuate postprandial cardiometabolic risk markers. However, no studies have evaluated the cardiometabolic response to breaking up sitting in a Qatari population. P...
Published on May 23, 2019
Christer Malm16
Estimated H-index: 16
,
Johan Jakobsson , Andreas Isaksson
Positive effects from sports are achieved primarily through physical activity, but secondary effects bring health benefits such as psychosocial and personal development and less alcohol consumption. Negative effects, such as the risk of failure, injuries, eating disorders, and burnout, are also apparent. Because physical activity is increasingly conducted in an organized manner, sport’s role in society has become increasingly important over the years, not only for the individual but also for pub...
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