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The associations between working memory and the effects of four different types of written corrective feedback

Published on Sep 1, 2019in Journal of Second Language Writing 3.32
· DOI :10.1016/j.jslw.2019.03.003
Shaofeng Li16
Estimated H-index: 16
(FSU: Florida State University),
Saeed Roshan (AUT: Auckland University of Technology)
Abstract
Abstract Working memory has been posited to play an important role in affecting the processes of writing (Kellogg, 1996). However, to date there has been limited research on its role in second language writing and no research on whether it is associated with the effects of written corrective feedback in second language learning. This study examines the associations between two types of working memory—complex working memory and phonological short-term memory—and the effectiveness of four types of written corrective feedback: direct corrective feedback, direct corrective feedback plus revision, metalinguistic explanation, and metalinguistic explanation plus revision. Seventy-nine adult learners of English as a foreign language performed three writing tasks and took two working memory tests: a reading span test (complex working memory) and a non-word span test (phonological short-term memory). The results showed that (1) complex working memory was a positive predictor of the effects of metalinguistic explanation and the effects of direct corrective feedback plus revision, and (2) phonological short-term memory was a negative predictor of the effects of direct corrective feedback plus revision. The results suggest that the role of working memory varies as a function of feedback type and that complex working memory and phonological short-term memory may have opposite associations with the effectiveness of written feedback.
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Published on Feb 23, 2017
Shaofeng Li16
Estimated H-index: 16
3 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 2017in Applied Psycholinguistics 1.84
Yuichi Suzuki6
Estimated H-index: 6
(Kanagawa University),
Robert DeKeyser22
Estimated H-index: 22
(UMD: University of Maryland, College Park)
The current exploratory study aimed at investigating the role of cognitive aptitudes in determining the effect of practice distribution on second language learning. The study investigated to what extent language-analytic ability and working-memory capacity predicted the acquisition of grammar under two learning conditions that differ in the interval between the two training sessions. Learners of Japanese as a second language were trained on an element of Japanese morphosyntax under either distri...
7 Citations Source Cite
Published on Oct 1, 2016in Applied Linguistics 3.23
Cristina Sanz19
Estimated H-index: 19
(Georgetown University),
Hui-Ju Lin2
Estimated H-index: 2
(CYCU: Chung Yuan Christian University)
+ 2 AuthorsHarriet Wood Bowden10
Estimated H-index: 10
(UT: University of Tennessee)
The article summarizes results from two experimental studies (N = 23, N = 21) investigating the extent to which working memory capacity (WMC) intervenes in ab initio language development under two pedagogical conditions [ ± grammar lesson + input-based practice + explicit feedback]. The linguistic target is the use of morphosyntax to assign semantic functions in Latin. Results suggest that with the more traditional pedagogical approach [+ grammar lesson], WMC does not predict learner outcomes. I...
12 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jun 1, 2016in Studies in Second Language Acquisition 2.70
Luis Cerezo4
Estimated H-index: 4
(AU: American University),
Allison Caras2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Georgetown University),
Ronald P. Leow19
Estimated H-index: 19
(Georgetown University)
16 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jun 1, 2016in Studies in Second Language Acquisition 2.70
Luis Cerezo4
Estimated H-index: 4
(AU: American University),
Allison Caras2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Georgetown University),
Ronald P. Leow19
Estimated H-index: 19
(Georgetown University)
11 Citations Source Cite
Published on Dec 31, 2015
Alan Baddeley1
Estimated H-index: 1
14 Citations Source Cite
Published on Dec 1, 2015in Journal of Second Language Writing 3.32
Qiandi Liu1
Estimated H-index: 1
(NAU: Northern Arizona University),
Dan Brown4
Estimated H-index: 4
(NAU: Northern Arizona University)
Abstract Despite an abundance of research on corrective feedback (CF) in L2 writing, answers to fundamental questions of whether and to what extent various types of CF can promote accuracy remain inconclusive. Reviewers have pointed to the methodological limitations and inconsistencies in the domain; nevertheless, such arguments are largely anecdotal rather than based on systematic inquiry of primary empirical studies. Driven by the gap, this methodological synthesis reviews the state-of-the-art...
29 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jun 1, 2015in The Modern Language Journal 2.79
Charis Stefanou1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Lancaster University),
Andrea Révész13
Estimated H-index: 13
(IOE: Institute of Education)
This article reports on a classroom-based study that investigated the effectiveness of direct written corrective feedback in relation to learner differences in grammatical sensitivity and knowledge of metalanguage. The study employed a pretest–posttest–delayed posttest design with two treatment sessions. Eighty-nine Greek English as a foreign language (EFL) learners were randomly assigned to 3 groups: direct feedback only, direct feedback plus metalinguistic comments, and comparison. The linguis...
10 Citations Source Cite
Published on Apr 1, 2015in System 1.55
Natsuko Shintani13
Estimated H-index: 13
(University of Auckland),
Rod Ellis81
Estimated H-index: 81
(SISU: Shanghai International Studies University)
Abstract Recent research has shown that written corrective feedback helps to improve learners' grammatical accuracy in new pieces of writing. However, little is known about how individual differences mediate the extent that learners benefit from feedback. This article reports a correlational study designed to examine whether one individual difference factor––language analytical ability (LAA)––mediated the extent to which 118 Japanese university students of English improved in their accurate use ...
16 Citations Source Cite
Published on Mar 1, 2015in The Modern Language Journal 2.79
EunYoung Kang1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Columbia University),
ZhaoHong Han16
Estimated H-index: 16
(Columbia University)
Written corrective feedback has been subject to increasing attention in recent years, in part because of the conceptual controversy surrounding it and in part because of its ubiquitous practice. This study takes a meta-analytic approach to synthesizing extant empirical research, including 21 primary studies. Guiding the analysis are two questions: Does written corrective feedback help to improve the grammatical accuracy of second language writing? What factors might mitigate its efficacy? Result...
30 Citations Source Cite