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Cold water immersion improves recovery of sprint speed following a simulated tournament

Published on Apr 6, 2019in European Journal of Sport Science2.38
· DOI :10.1080/17461391.2019.1585478
Jonathan Leeder5
Estimated H-index: 5
(Northumbria University),
Matthew Godfrey (Northumbria University)+ 4 AuthorsGlyn Howatson30
Estimated H-index: 30
(Northumbria University)
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Abstract
It is a common requirement in tournament scenarios for athletes to compete multiple times in a relatively short time period, with insufficient recovery time not allowing full restoration of physical performance. This study aimed to develop a greater understanding of the physiological stress experienced by athletes in a tournament scenario, and how a commonly used recovery strategy, cold water immersion (CWI), might influence these markers. Twenty one trained male games players (age 19 ± 2; body mass 78.0 ± 8.8 kg) were randomised into a CWI group (n =11) or a control group (n = 10). To simulate a tournament, participants completed the Loughborough Intermittent Shuttle Test (LIST) on three occasions in five days. Recovery was assessed at specific time points using markers of sprint performance, muscle function, muscle soreness and biochemical markers of damage (creatine kinase, CK), inflammation (IL-6 and C-Reactive Protein) and oxidative stress (lipid hydroperoxides and activity of 6 lipid soluble antioxidants). The simulated tournament was associated with perturbations in some, but not all, markers of physiological stress and recovery. Cold water immersion was associated with improved recovery of sprint speed 24 h after the final LIST (ES = 0.83±0.59; P=0.034) and attenuated the efflux of CK pre- and post-LIST 3 (P<0.01). The tournament scenario resulted in an escalation of physiological stress that, in the main, cold water immersion was ineffective at managing. These data suggest that CWI is not harmful, and provides limited benefits in attenuating the deleterious effects of experienced during tournament scenarios.
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Published on May 1, 2017in Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise4.48
Kevin Thomas11
Estimated H-index: 11
,
Jack Dent2
Estimated H-index: 2
+ 1 AuthorsStuart Goodall16
Estimated H-index: 16
Purpose: We profiled the etiology and recovery of neuromuscular fatigue post-simulated-soccer-match-play. Methods: Fifteen semi-professional players completed a 90 min simulated soccer match. Pre-, immediately-post and at 24, 48 and 72 h participants completed a battery of neuromuscular, physical and perceptual tests. Perceived fatigue and muscle soreness were assessed via visual analogue scales. Maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) and twitch responses to electrical (femoral nerve) and magnetic ...
Published on Sep 14, 2015in Journal of Sports Sciences2.81
Jonathan Leeder5
Estimated H-index: 5
(English Institute of Sport),
Ken A. van Someren18
Estimated H-index: 18
(Northumbria University)
+ 4 AuthorsGlyn Howatson30
Estimated H-index: 30
(Northumbria University)
AbstractThis study investigated the effects of two different hydrostatic pressures (seated or standing) during cold water immersion at attenuating the deleterious effects of strenuous exercise on indices of damage and recovery. Twenty four male well-trained games players (age 23 ± 3 years; body mass 81.4 ± 8.7 kg: O2max 57.5 ± 4.9 ml∙kg−1∙min−1) completed the Loughborough Intermittent Shuttle Test (LIST) and were randomly assigned to either a control, seated cold water immersion or a standing co...
Published on Nov 1, 2014in Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise4.48
James R. Broatch4
Estimated H-index: 4
,
Aaron C. Petersen14
Estimated H-index: 14
,
David Bishop56
Estimated H-index: 56
ABSTRACTBROATCH, J. R., A. PETERSEN, and D. J. BISHOP. Postexercise Cold Water Immersion Benefits Are Not Greater than the PlaceboEffect. Med. Sci. Sports Exerc., Vol. 46, No. 11, pp. 2139–2147, 2014. Purpose: Despite a general lack of understanding of theunderlying mechanisms, cold water immersion (CWI) is widely used by athletes for recovery. This study examined the physiologicalmerit of CWI for recovery from high-intensity exercise by investigating if the placebo effect is responsible for any...
Jonathan Leeder5
Estimated H-index: 5
,
Ken A. van Someren18
Estimated H-index: 18
+ 5 AuthorsGlyn Howatson30
Estimated H-index: 30
PURPOSE: This investigation aimed to 1) ascertain a detailed physiological profile of recovery from intermittent sprint exercise on athletes familiar with the exercise, and 2) investigate if athletes receive a protective effect on markers of exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD), inflammation and oxidative stress following a repeated exposure to an identical bout of intermittent sprint exercise. METHODS: Eight well trained male team sport athletes of National League or English University Premier...
Published on Jul 1, 2013in British Journal of Sports Medicine11.64
Christian J. Cook33
Estimated H-index: 33
(Imperial College London),
Chris Martyn Beaven1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Mid Sweden University)
Background Training recovery is vital for adaptation and performance, and to avoid cumulative fatigue and symptoms associated with overtraining. The use of cold-water immersion (CWI) as a recovery strategy is common; however, the physiological and biochemical rationale behind its use remains unclear. This study aimed to assess the relationship between body temperature responses to water immersion and individual perception of recovery, with subsequent exercise performance. Methods Twelve male rug...
Published on Nov 1, 2012in European Journal of Sport Science2.38
Jo Corbett17
Estimated H-index: 17
(University of Portsmouth),
Martin J. Barwood14
Estimated H-index: 14
(University of Portsmouth)
+ 2 AuthorsMike Tipton26
Estimated H-index: 26
(University of Portsmouth)
Abstract Aim: To investigate the effect of different water immersion (WI) treatments on recovery from intermittent shuttle running exercise in comparison to an ecologically relevant control. Methods: Forty males performed 90 minutes intermittent shuttle running, following which they were assigned to either: (1) 12-min standing WI at 12°C; (2) 12-min standing WI at 35°C; (3) 2-min seated WI at 12°C; (4) an ecologically relevant control consisting of 12 minutes walking at 5 km h−1. Muscle soreness...
Published on Mar 1, 2012in British Journal of Sports Medicine11.64
Jonathan Leeder5
Estimated H-index: 5
,
Conor Gissane22
Estimated H-index: 22
+ 2 AuthorsGlyn Howatson30
Estimated H-index: 30
Elite-level athletic training and competition is accompanied by the recovery of a series of physiological stressors. The physiological stress will vary considerably depending upon the specific exercise type, duration and intensity and also on the athletes' familiarisation to the exercise insult. It is well documented that when the exercise stress incorporates a novel eccentric component or the exercise is of considerable intensity or duration,1 athletes will likely experience numerous signs and ...
Published on Feb 15, 2012in Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews7.75
Chris M Bleakley29
Estimated H-index: 29
(Ulster University),
Suzanne McDonough37
Estimated H-index: 37
(Ulster University)
+ 3 AuthorsGareth W. Davison21
Estimated H-index: 21
(Ulster University)
Background Many strategies are in use with the intention of preventing or minimising delayed onset muscle soreness and fatigue after exercise. Cold-water immersion, in water temperatures of less than 15°C, is currently one of the most popular interventional strategies used after exercise. Objectives To determine the effects of cold-water immersion in the management of muscle soreness after exercise. Search methods In February 2010, we searched the Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Group Spe...
Published on Jan 1, 2012in Sao Paulo Medical Journal1.09
Chris M Bleakley29
Estimated H-index: 29
(Ulster University),
Suzanne McDonough37
Estimated H-index: 37
(Ulster University)
+ 3 AuthorsGareth W. Davison21
Estimated H-index: 21
(Ulster University)
BACKGROUND: Many strategies are in use with the intention of preventing or minimizing delayed onset muscle soreness and fatigue after exercise. Cold-water immersion, in water temperatures of less than 15 °C, is currently one of the most popular interventional strategies used after exercise. OBJECTIVES: To determine the effects of cold-water immersion in the management of muscle soreness after exercise. SEARCH METHODS: In February 2010, we searched the Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Group...
Published on Jan 1, 2011in Journal of Sports Sciences2.81
Greg J. Rowsell8
Estimated H-index: 8
(South Australian Sports Institute),
Aaron J. Coutts47
Estimated H-index: 47
(UTS: University of Technology, Sydney)
+ 1 AuthorsStephen Hill-Haas15
Estimated H-index: 15
(UWA: University of Western Australia)
Abstract In this study, we investigated the effects of two hydrotherapy interventions on match running performance and perceptual measures of fatigue and recovery during a 4-day soccer tournament. Twenty male junior soccer players were assigned to one of two treatment groups and undertook either cold-water immersion (5 × 1 min at 10°C) or thermoneutral water immersion (5 × 1 min at 34°C) after each match. High-intensity running distance (>15 km · h−1) and total distance covered, time spent in lo...
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