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Cold water immersion improves recovery of sprint speed following a simulated tournament

Published on Oct 21, 2019in European Journal of Sport Science2.376
· DOI :10.1080/17461391.2019.1585478
Jonathan Leeder5
Estimated H-index: 5
(Northumbria University),
Matthew Godfrey (Northumbria University)+ 4 AuthorsGlyn Howatson31
Estimated H-index: 31
(Northumbria University)
Abstract
AbstractIt is a common requirement in tournament scenarios for athletes to compete multiple times in a relatively short time period, with insufficient recovery time not allowing full restoration of...
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References34
Newest
Purpose: We profiled the etiology and recovery of neuromuscular fatigue post-simulated-soccer-match-play. Methods: Fifteen semi-professional players completed a 90 min simulated soccer match. Pre-, immediately-post and at 24, 48 and 72 h participants completed a battery of neuromuscular, physical and perceptual tests. Perceived fatigue and muscle soreness were assessed via visual analogue scales. Maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) and twitch responses to electrical (femoral nerve) and magnetic ...
23 CitationsSource
#1Phillip G. Bell (Northumbria University)H-Index: 11
#2Emma J. Stevenson (Newcastle University)H-Index: 25
Last. Glyn Howatson (Northumbria University)H-Index: 31
view all 4 authors...
This study investigated Montmorency tart cherry concentrate (MC) supplementation on markers of recovery following prolonged, intermittent sprint activity. Sixteen semi-professional, male soccer players, who had dietary restrictions imposed for the duration of the study, were divided into two equal groups and consumed either MC or placebo (PLA) supplementation for eight consecutive days (30 mL twice per day). On day 5, participants completed an adapted version of the Loughborough Intermittent Shu...
25 CitationsSource
#1Jonathan Leeder (English Institute of Sport)H-Index: 5
#2Ken A. van Someren (Northumbria University)H-Index: 19
Last. Glyn Howatson (Northumbria University)H-Index: 31
view all 7 authors...
AbstractThis study investigated the effects of two different hydrostatic pressures (seated or standing) during cold water immersion at attenuating the deleterious effects of strenuous exercise on indices of damage and recovery. Twenty four male well-trained games players (age 23 ± 3 years; body mass 81.4 ± 8.7 kg: O2max 57.5 ± 4.9 ml∙kg−1∙min−1) completed the Loughborough Intermittent Shuttle Test (LIST) and were randomly assigned to either a control, seated cold water immersion or a standing co...
9 CitationsSource
ABSTRACTBROATCH, J. R., A. PETERSEN, and D. J. BISHOP. Postexercise Cold Water Immersion Benefits Are Not Greater than the PlaceboEffect. Med. Sci. Sports Exerc., Vol. 46, No. 11, pp. 2139–2147, 2014. Purpose: Despite a general lack of understanding of theunderlying mechanisms, cold water immersion (CWI) is widely used by athletes for recovery. This study examined the physiologicalmerit of CWI for recovery from high-intensity exercise by investigating if the placebo effect is responsible for any...
51 CitationsSource
PURPOSE: This investigation aimed to 1) ascertain a detailed physiological profile of recovery from intermittent sprint exercise on athletes familiar with the exercise, and 2) investigate if athletes receive a protective effect on markers of exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD), inflammation and oxidative stress following a repeated exposure to an identical bout of intermittent sprint exercise. METHODS: Eight well trained male team sport athletes of National League or English University Premier...
19 CitationsSource
#1Christian J. Cook (Imperial College London)H-Index: 35
#2Chris Martyn Beaven (Mid Sweden University)H-Index: 1
Background Training recovery is vital for adaptation and performance, and to avoid cumulative fatigue and symptoms associated with overtraining. The use of cold-water immersion (CWI) as a recovery strategy is common; however, the physiological and biochemical rationale behind its use remains unclear. This study aimed to assess the relationship between body temperature responses to water immersion and individual perception of recovery, with subsequent exercise performance. Methods Twelve male rug...
26 CitationsSource
#1Jo Corbett (University of Portsmouth)H-Index: 18
#2Martin J. Barwood (University of Portsmouth)H-Index: 16
Last. Mike Tipton (University of Portsmouth)H-Index: 28
view all 5 authors...
Abstract Aim: To investigate the effect of different water immersion (WI) treatments on recovery from intermittent shuttle running exercise in comparison to an ecologically relevant control. Methods: Forty males performed 90 minutes intermittent shuttle running, following which they were assigned to either: (1) 12-min standing WI at 12°C; (2) 12-min standing WI at 35°C; (3) 2-min seated WI at 12°C; (4) an ecologically relevant control consisting of 12 minutes walking at 5 km h−1. Muscle soreness...
11 CitationsSource
#1Jonathan LeederH-Index: 5
#2Conor GissaneH-Index: 23
Last. Glyn HowatsonH-Index: 31
view all 5 authors...
Elite-level athletic training and competition is accompanied by the recovery of a series of physiological stressors. The physiological stress will vary considerably depending upon the specific exercise type, duration and intensity and also on the athletes' familiarisation to the exercise insult. It is well documented that when the exercise stress incorporates a novel eccentric component or the exercise is of considerable intensity or duration,1 athletes will likely experience numerous signs and ...
140 CitationsSource
#1Chris M Bleakley (Ulster University)H-Index: 28
#2Suzanne McDonough (Ulster University)H-Index: 38
Last. Gareth W. Davison (Ulster University)H-Index: 23
view all 6 authors...
Background Many strategies are in use with the intention of preventing or minimising delayed onset muscle soreness and fatigue after exercise. Cold-water immersion, in water temperatures of less than 15°C, is currently one of the most popular interventional strategies used after exercise. Objectives To determine the effects of cold-water immersion in the management of muscle soreness after exercise. Search methods In February 2010, we searched the Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Group Spe...
55 CitationsSource
#1Chris M Bleakley (Ulster University)H-Index: 28
#2Suzanne McDonough (Ulster University)H-Index: 38
Last. Gareth W. Davison (Ulster University)H-Index: 23
view all 6 authors...
BACKGROUND: Many strategies are in use with the intention of preventing or minimizing delayed onset muscle soreness and fatigue after exercise. Cold-water immersion, in water temperatures of less than 15 °C, is currently one of the most popular interventional strategies used after exercise. OBJECTIVES: To determine the effects of cold-water immersion in the management of muscle soreness after exercise. SEARCH METHODS: In February 2010, we searched the Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Group...
69 CitationsSource
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#1Marc WernerH-Index: 1
#2Holger CramerH-Index: 34
Last. Petra KloseH-Index: 22
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