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References94
Newest
Published on Nov 1, 2018in Protoplasma 2.46
Lorenzo Alibardi27
Estimated H-index: 27
(UNIBO: University of Bologna)
The digital adhesive pads that allow gecko lizards to climb vertical surfaces result from the modification of the oberhautchen layer of the epidermis in normal scales. This produces sticky filaments of 10–100 μm in length, called setae that are composed of various proteins. The prevalent types, termed corneous beta proteins (CBPs), have a low molecular weight (12–20 kDa) and contain a conserved central region of 34 amino acids with a beta-conformation. This determines their polymerization into l...
5 Citations Source Cite
Published on Apr 1, 2018in Cretaceous Research 1.93
Gabriela Fontanarrosa2
Estimated H-index: 2
(CONICET: National Scientific and Technical Research Council),
Juan D. Daza14
Estimated H-index: 14
(SHSU: Sam Houston State University),
Virginia Abdala19
Estimated H-index: 19
(CONICET: National Scientific and Technical Research Council)
Abstract Gekkota (geckos and pygopodids) is a clade thought to have originated in the Early Cretaceous and that today exhibits one of the most remarkable scansorial capabilities among lizards. Little information is available regarding the origin of scansoriality, which subsequently became widespread and diverse in terms of ecomorphology in this clade. An undescribed amber fossil (MCZ R–190835) from mid-Cretaceous outcrops of the north of Myanmar dated at 99 Ma, previously assigned to stem Gekkot...
2 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 31, 2018
Paul M. Oliver13
Estimated H-index: 13
(ANU: Australian National University),
Rafe M. Brown33
Estimated H-index: 33
(KU: University of Kansas)
+ 3 AuthorsCameron D. Siler18
Estimated H-index: 18
(AMNH: American Museum of Natural History)
Regions with complex geological histories often have diverse and highly endemic biotas, yet inferring the ecological and historical processes shaping this relationship remains challenging. Here, in the context of the taxon cycle model of insular community assembly, we investigate patterns of lineage diversity and habitat usage in a newly characterized vertebrate radiation centred upon the world9s most geologically complex insular region: island arcs spanning from the Philippines to Fiji. On isla...
3 Citations Source Cite
Published on Sep 1, 2017in Gondwana Research 5.66
Lida Xing18
Estimated H-index: 18
(China University of Geosciences),
Jingmai K. O'Connor22
Estimated H-index: 22
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
+ 4 AuthorsMing Bai15
Estimated H-index: 15
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
Abstract Burmese amber has recently provided some detailed glimpses of plumage, soft tissues, and osteology of juvenile enantiornithine birds, but these insights have been restricted to isolated wing apices. Here we describe nearly half of a hatchling individual, based on osteological and soft tissue data obtained from the skull, neck, feet, and wing, and identified as a member of the extinct avian clade Enantiornithes. Preserved soft tissue provides the unique opportunity to observe the externa...
19 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jul 1, 2017in Journal of Evolutionary Biology 2.54
Tony Gamble20
Estimated H-index: 20
(Marquette University),
Eli Greenbaum17
Estimated H-index: 17
(UTEP: University of Texas at El Paso)
+ 2 AuthorsAaron M. Bauer39
Estimated H-index: 39
(Villanova University)
We published a phylogenetic comparative analysis that found geckos had gained and lost adhesive toepads multiple times over their long evolutionary history (Gamble et al. 2012). This was consistent with decades of morphological studies showing geckos had evolved adhesive toepads on multiple occasions and that the morphology of geckos with ancestrally padless digits can be distinguished from secondarily padless forms. Recently, Harrington and Reeder (2017) reanalyzed data from Gamble et al. (2012...
6 Citations Source Cite
Published on Feb 1, 2017in Journal of Evolutionary Biology 2.54
Sean M. Harrington3
Estimated H-index: 3
(SDSU: San Diego State University),
Tod W. Reeder29
Estimated H-index: 29
(SDSU: San Diego State University)
The binary-state speciation and extinction (BiSSE) model has been used in many instances to identify state-dependent diversification and reconstruct ancestral states. However, recent studies have shown that the standard procedure of comparing the fit of the BiSSE model to constant-rate birth-death models often inappropriately favors the BiSSE model when diversification rates vary in a state-independent fashion. The newly-developed HiSSE model enables researchers to identify state-dependent diver...
10 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 2017in Journal of Zoology 1.96
Anthony P. Russell37
Estimated H-index: 37
(U of C: University of Calgary),
M.‐J. Delaugerre1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Conservatoire du littoral)
Two distinctive patterns of adhesive toepad are found in the Gekkota – terminal leaf-like pads situated at the distal ends of the digits, and basal pads that encroach more proximally along the digits, are proportionally larger and are associated with more than just the ungual and distal portion of the penultimate phalanges. Although these two configurations have long been recognized, there has been no explanation of whether or not they are functionally different. A small offshore island provided...
6 Citations Source Cite
Published on Dec 1, 2016in Current Biology 9.25
Lida Xing18
Estimated H-index: 18
(China University of Geosciences),
Ryan C. McKellar5
Estimated H-index: 5
(University of Regina)
+ 11 AuthorsAlexander P. Wolfe47
Estimated H-index: 47
(U of A: University of Alberta)
Summary In the two decades since the discovery of feathered dinosaurs [1–3], the range of plumage known from non-avialan theropods has expanded significantly, confirming several features predicted by developmentally informed models of feather evolution [4–10]. However, three-dimensional feather morphology and evolutionary patterns remain difficult to interpret, due to compression in sedimentary rocks [9, 11]. Recent discoveries in Cretaceous amber from Canada, France, Japan, Lebanon, Myanmar, an...
32 Citations Source Cite
Published on Sep 1, 2016in Biological Journal of The Linnean Society 2.53
Timothy E. Higham24
Estimated H-index: 24
(UCR: University of California, Riverside),
Tony Gamble20
Estimated H-index: 20
(Marquette University),
Anthony P. Russell37
Estimated H-index: 37
(U of C: University of Calgary)
The evolutionary history of vertebrate locomotion is punctuated by innovations that have permitted expansion into novel ecological niches. Frictional adhesion of geckos is an innovation renowned for enabling locomotion on vertical and inverted smooth surfaces. Much is known about the microstructure and function of the fully-expressed gekkotan adhesive apparatus, although how it originated is poorly understood. Therefore, identifying species that exhibit the earliest stages of expression of frict...
16 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jul 1, 2016in Acta Zoologica 1.07
Anthony P. Russell37
Estimated H-index: 37
(U of C: University of Calgary),
Garrett S. Oetelaar1
Estimated H-index: 1
(U of C: University of Calgary)
Geckos with subdigital adhesive pads can scale smooth vertical surfaces in defiance of gravity. The deployment of the adhesive system is activated by the musculoskeletal system during active traverses of such surfaces, but adhesion on such substrata can also be achieved by passive means, with the body weight of the gecko applying tensile loading to the adhesive setae, maintaining prolonged, static contact with the surface. To investigate whether passively induced adhesion is employed by geckos h...
12 Citations Source Cite
Cited By3
Newest
Published on May 9, 2019in Integrative and Comparative Biology 2.75
Emily R Naylor1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UCR: University of California, Riverside),
Timothy E. Higham24
Estimated H-index: 24
(UCR: University of California, Riverside)
1 Citations Source Cite
Published on May 7, 2019in Integrative and Comparative Biology 2.75
Anthony P. Russell37
Estimated H-index: 37
(U of C: University of Calgary),
Alyssa Y Stark1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Villanova University),
Timothy E. Higham24
Estimated H-index: 24
(UCR: University of California, Riverside)
Source Cite
Published on Apr 27, 2019in Integrative and Comparative Biology 2.75
Timothy E. Higham24
Estimated H-index: 24
(UCR: University of California, Riverside),
Anthony P. Russell37
Estimated H-index: 37
(U of C: University of Calgary)
+ 2 AuthorsThomas Speck30
Estimated H-index: 30
(University of Freiburg)
2 Citations Source Cite