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Vexing questions that sustain sensemaking

Published on May 24, 2019in International Journal of Science Education 1.32
· DOI :10.1080/09500693.2019.1589655
Tor Ole B. Odden1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Wisconsin-Madison),
Rosemary S. Russ10
Estimated H-index: 10
(University of Wisconsin-Madison)
Abstract
ABSTRACTCurrent science education reforms highlight the importance of students making sense of scientific ideas. While research has studied how to support sensemaking in classrooms, we still know very little about what drives students to pursue and persist in it on their own. In this article, we use a set of parallel case studies of undergraduate students discussing introductory physics to show how certain student-generated, vexing questions both initiate and sustain students' sensemaking processes. We examine affective and linguistic markers in student discourse in paired-clinical interviews to demonstrate both of these functions of vexing questions and detail their role in the explanations students construct. We conclude by discussing the implications of this analysis both for supporting sensemaking in classrooms and for studying it in research.
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Published on Jan 1, 2019in Science Education 3.04
Tor Ole B. Odden1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Oslo),
Rosemary S. Russ10
Estimated H-index: 10
(University of Wisconsin-Madison)
2 Citations Source Cite
Published on Nov 19, 2018in The Journal of the Learning Sciences 3.00
Rosemary S. Russ10
Estimated H-index: 10
(University of Wisconsin-Madison),
Leema K. Berland12
Estimated H-index: 12
(University of Wisconsin-Madison)
A central goal of science education reform is for students to participate in scientific sense making rather than to merely acquire science facts. However, even in classrooms utilizing reform-based pedagogies, students are typically allowed to construct knowledge only insofar as they construct expected knowledge. In this report and reflection, we use activity theory to demonstrate how this pervasive tension between learning correct ideas and constructing one’s own ideas often results in unacknowl...
2 Citations Source Cite
Published on Oct 13, 2017in International Journal of Science Education 1.32
Amanda Benedict-Chambers1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Missouri State University),
Sylvie M. Kademian2
Estimated H-index: 2
(University of Michigan)
+ 1 AuthorsAnnemarie Sullivan Palincsar33
Estimated H-index: 33
(University of Michigan)
ABSTRACTScience education reforms articulate a vision of ambitious science teaching where teachers engage students in sensemaking discussions and emphasise the integration of scientific practices with science content. Learning to teach in this way is complex, and there are few examples of sensemaking discussions in schools where textbook lessons and teacher-directed discussions are the norm. The purpose of this study was to characterise the questioning practices of an experienced teacher who tau...
1 Citations Source Cite
Published on Aug 11, 2017
Anna McLean Phillips3
Estimated H-index: 3
,
Jessica Watkins14
Estimated H-index: 14
,
David Hammer54
Estimated H-index: 54
10 Citations Source Cite
Published on May 15, 2017
Vesal Dini1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Tufts University),
David Hammer54
Estimated H-index: 54
(Tufts University)
7 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 2017in Science Education 3.04
Shulamit Kapon5
Estimated H-index: 5
9 Citations Source Cite
Published on Sep 1, 2016in Journal of Research in Science Teaching 3.21
Leema K. Berland12
Estimated H-index: 12
(University of Wisconsin-Madison),
Christina V. Schwarz12
Estimated H-index: 12
(Michigan State University)
+ 3 AuthorsBrian J. Reiser34
Estimated H-index: 34
(Northwestern University)
Recent research and policy documents call for engaging students and teachers in scientific practices such that the goal of science education shifts from students knowing scientific and epistemic ideas, to students developing and using these understandings as tools to make sense of the world. This perspective pushes students to move beyond the rote performance of scientific actions or processes and engage instead in purposeful knowledge construction work. This raises parallel questions about how ...
68 Citations Source Cite
Published on Apr 2, 2016in The Journal of the Learning Sciences 3.00
Lama Z. Jaber3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Florida State University),
David Hammer54
Estimated H-index: 54
(Tufts University)
Most accounts of affect and motivation in the science education literature have discussed them as relevant to, but distinct from, disciplinary pursuits. These include Pintrich’s seminal work on affective and motivational factors in learning science (P. R. Pintrich, 1999, 2003; P. R. Pintrich & E. De Groot, 1990; P. R. Pintrich, R. W. Marx, & R. A. Boyle, 1993). Our purpose here is to build on those ideas, drawing as well on accounts of scientists’ practices (e.g., H. E. Gruber, 1974; E. F. Kelle...
19 Citations Source Cite
Published on Mar 1, 2016in Science Education 3.04
Lama Z. Jaber3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Florida State University),
David Hammer54
Estimated H-index: 54
(Tufts University)
There is increased attention in the science education community on the importance of engaging students in the practices of science. However, there is much to be learned about how students enter into and sustain their engagement in these practices. In this paper, we argue that epistemic affect—feelings and emotions experienced within science, such as the excitement of having a new idea or irritation at an inconsistency—is part of what instigates and stabilizes disciplinary engagement. We first di...
23 Citations Source Cite
Published on Oct 1, 2015in The Physics Teacher 0.62
David P Maloney2
Estimated H-index: 2
The conjunction of three events has encouraged me to devote significant time to thinking about the pedagogical framework in my introductory courses. The three events were: doing a workshop addressing the Advanced Placement restructuring of the Physics B course with a stronger focus on critical thinking, finding out that TPT was planning an issue about the “science and art” of teaching, and dealing with a course that I haven't taught in about a decade, where the students behaved very differently ...
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