Match!

U.S. women's perceived importance of the harms and benefits of mammograms and associations with screening ambivalence: Results from a national survey

Published on Jun 1, 2019in Preventive Medicine3.449
· DOI :10.1016/j.ypmed.2019.03.023
Xuanzi Qin1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UMN: University of Minnesota),
Rebekah H. Nagler15
Estimated H-index: 15
(UMN: University of Minnesota)
+ 1 AuthorsSarah E. Gollust31
Estimated H-index: 31
(UMN: University of Minnesota)
Source
Abstract
Abstract The American Cancer Society and the U.S. Preventive Task Force recently recommended that women initiate routine breast cancer screening at older ages (45 and 50, respectively) than previously recommended, and both organizations emphasize the importance of weighing the harms of mammograms against the benefits in making informed decisions. However, little is known from national samples about how women perceive the harms and benefits of mammograms, and how these perceptions relate to their attitudes about getting mammograms. To fill this gap, we surveyed a nationally representative sample of 557 U.S. women aged 30–59 about their perceptions of harms and benefits and their attitudinal ambivalence toward mammograms. We found that respondents overall perceived the benefits as more important than harms, but those who were aware of recent recommendations perceived mammogram harms as more important than those who were unaware. Women who had a mammogram within one year perceived the harms as less important and the benefits as more important, compared to those who had not had a mammogram in the past year. Those who perceived the harms as important were more ambivalent about screening than those who perceived harms as less important. We conclude that if the public health goal is to prevent the population harms from overuse of mammograms (e.g., overdiagnosis, false positives), simply providing women with information about harms and benefits may not lead to this outcome, since women are likely to perceive the benefits as more important than harms, and thus make an informed choice to obtain screening.
  • References (38)
  • Citations (0)
📖 Papers frequently viewed together
12 Citations
23 Citations
200027.60BMJ
1 Author (Peticolas A)
78% of Scinapse members use related papers. After signing in, all features are FREE.
References38
Newest
#1Rebekah H. Nagler (UMN: University of Minnesota)H-Index: 15
#2Marco Yzer (UMN: University of Minnesota)H-Index: 22
Last. Alexander J. Rothman (UMN: University of Minnesota)H-Index: 43
view all 3 authors...
3 CitationsSource
#1Jaya M. Mehta (Mayo Clinic)H-Index: 1
#2Kathy L. MacLaughlin (Mayo Clinic)H-Index: 10
Last. Juliana M. Kling (Mayo Clinic)H-Index: 8
view all 14 authors...
Abstract Background: In recently updated breast cancer screening guidelines, the American Cancer Society (ACS) and United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommended increasing mammo...
1 CitationsSource
#1Rebekah H. Nagler (UMN: University of Minnesota)H-Index: 15
#2Erika Franklin Fowler (Wesleyan University)H-Index: 14
Last. Sarah E. Gollust (UMN: University of Minnesota)H-Index: 31
view all 5 authors...
Abstract Background There is longstanding expert disagreement about the age at and frequency with which women should be screened for breast cancer. These debates are reflected in the conflicting recommendations about mammography issued by major professional organizations, such as the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force and the American Cancer Society. Previous research has shown that these recommendations garner substantial media attention—and therefore might affect women's screening perceptions...
2 CitationsSource
#1Adrian C Traeger (USYD: University of Sydney)H-Index: 11
Woloshin and Schwartz, alongside other “less is more” crusaders, place great faith in sharing decisions as a way forward in the fight against overdiagnosis.1 I consider myself such a crusader, but I am less optimistic about the promise of shared decision making. Diagnostic imaging of non-serious lower back pain, for example, is massively overused, and it offers …
1 CitationsSource
#1Julia Abelson (McMaster University)H-Index: 38
#2Laura Tripp (McMaster University)H-Index: 1
Last. Jonathan Sussman (Juravinski Hospital)H-Index: 28
view all 5 authors...
Abstract Evolving scientific evidence about mammography has raised new questions about the net benefits of organized screening, yet gaps remain about women's current screening practices, knowledge, attitudes and values toward screening to support informed decision making in this area. We addressed this gap through an online survey of 2000 screen-eligible women from Ontario, Canada in January 2016. Likert-scaled and categorical questions were used to collect information about screening practices,...
3 CitationsSource
#1Rebekah H. NaglerH-Index: 15
#2Erika Franklin Fowler (Wesleyan University)H-Index: 4
Last. Sarah E. GollustH-Index: 31
view all 3 authors...
Background:Scientists, clinicians, and other experts aim to maximize the benefits of cancer screening while minimizing its harms. Chief among these harms are overdiagnosis and overtreatment. Although available data suggest that patient awareness of these harms is low, we know little about how patien
13 CitationsSource
#1Jiani Yu (UMN: University of Minnesota)H-Index: 1
#2Rebekah H. Nagler (UMN: University of Minnesota)H-Index: 15
Last. Sarah E. Gollust (UMN: University of Minnesota)H-Index: 31
view all 5 authors...
12 CitationsSource
#1Rebekah H. Nagler (UMN: University of Minnesota)H-Index: 15
#2Jennifer A. Lueck (A&M: Texas A&M University)H-Index: 3
Last. Lauren S. Gray (UMN: University of Minnesota)H-Index: 1
view all 3 authors...
Background There is substantial expert disagreement about the use of mammography to screen for breast cancer, and this disagreement routinely plays out in the media. Evidence suggests that some women are aware of the controversy over mammography, but less is known about whether immigrant and other underserved women have heard about it and, if so, how they react to it. Objective To explore immigrant women's awareness of and reactions to mammography controversy. Design Community-engaged qualitativ...
5 CitationsSource
#1Archana Radhakrishnan (Johns Hopkins University)H-Index: 3
#2Sarah A. Nowak (AN: RAND Corporation)H-Index: 8
Last. Craig Evan Pollack (Johns Hopkins University)H-Index: 26
view all 5 authors...
25 CitationsSource
#1Xuanzi Qin (UMN: University of Minnesota)H-Index: 1
#2Florence K. L. Tangka (CDC: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)H-Index: 21
Last. David H. Howard (Emory University)H-Index: 5
view all 4 authors...
Background In 2009, the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommended against routine mammography screening for women aged 40–49 years. This revised recommendation was widely criticized and has sparked off intense debate. The objectives of this study are to examine the impact of the revised recommendation on the proportion of women receiving mammograms and how the effect varied by age.
8 CitationsSource
Cited By0
Newest
#1Weijia Shi (UMN: University of Minnesota)
#2Rebekah H. Nagler (UMN: University of Minnesota)H-Index: 15
Last. Sarah E. Gollust (UMN: University of Minnesota)H-Index: 31
view all 4 authors...
ABSTRACTIn recent years, there has been a shift toward promoting informed decision making for mammography screening for average-risk women in their 40s. Professional organizations such as the Ameri...
Source