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Newest
Rob Voigt5
Estimated H-index: 5
(Stanford University),
Nicholas P. Camp2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Stanford University)
+ 6 AuthorsJennifer L. Eberhardt18
Estimated H-index: 18
(Stanford University)
Abstract Using footage from body-worn cameras, we analyze the respectfulness of police officer language toward white and black community members during routine traffic stops. We develop computational linguistic methods that extract levels of respect automatically from transcripts, informed by a thin-slicing study of participant ratings of officer utterances. We find that officers speak with consistently less respect toward black versus white community members, even after controlling for the race...
Published on Jan 1, 2017in Journal of Personality and Social Psychology5.92
Linda X. Zou1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Sapna Cheryan20
Estimated H-index: 20
Theories of race relations have been shaped by the concept of a racial hierarchy along which Whites are the most advantaged and African Americans the most disadvantaged. However, the recent precipitated growth of Latinos and Asian Americans in the United States underscores the need for a framework that integrates more groups. The current work proposes that racial and ethnic minority groups are disadvantaged along 2 distinct dimensions of perceived inferiority and perceived cultural foreignness, ...
Published on Nov 22, 2016in Frontiers in Psychology2.13
Andrea E. Abele32
Estimated H-index: 32
(FAU: University of Erlangen-Nuremberg),
Nicole Hauke1
Estimated H-index: 1
(FAU: University of Erlangen-Nuremberg)
+ 3 AuthorsYanping Duan6
Estimated H-index: 6
(Hong Kong Baptist University)
Agency (A) and communion (C) are fundamental content dimensions. We propose a facet-model that differentiates A into assertiveness (AA) and competence (AC) and C into warmth (CW) and morality (CM). We tested the model in a cross-cultural study by comparing data from Asia, Australia, Europe, and the USA (overall N = 1.808). Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses supported our model. Both the two-factor model and the four-factor model showed good fit indices across countries. Participants an...
Jin X. Goh5
Estimated H-index: 5
(NU: Northeastern University),
Judith A. Hall68
Estimated H-index: 68
(NU: Northeastern University),
Robert Rosenthal93
Estimated H-index: 93
(UCR: University of California, Riverside)
We outline the need to, and provide a guide on how to, conduct a meta-analysis on one's own studies within a manuscript. Although conducting a “mini meta” within one's manuscript has been argued for in the past, this practice is still relatively rare and adoption is slow. We believe two deterrents are responsible. First, researchers may not think that it is legitimate to do a meta-analysis on a small number of studies. Second, researchers may think a meta-analysis is too complicated to do withou...
Published on Oct 1, 2016in Current opinion in psychology
Susan T. Fiske83
Estimated H-index: 83
(Princeton University),
Cydney H. Dupree5
Estimated H-index: 5
(Princeton University)
+ 1 AuthorsJillian K. Swencionis7
Estimated H-index: 7
(Princeton University)
Hierarchies in the correlated forms of power (resources) and status (prestige) are constants that organize human societies. This article reviews relevant social psychological literature and identifies several converging results concerning power and status. Whether rank is chronically possessed or temporarily embodied, higher ranks create psychological distance from others, allow agency by the higher ranked, and exact deference from the lower ranked. Beliefs that status entails competence are ess...
Published on May 1, 2016in Journal of Experimental Social Psychology3.29
Jillian K. Swencionis7
Estimated H-index: 7
(Princeton University),
Susan T. Fiske83
Estimated H-index: 83
(Princeton University)
Abstract We hypothesized participants would adopt diverging impression management strategies when interacting with lower- versus higher-status others, to disconfirm status-based stereotypes of their own respective coldness or incompetence. In Study 1, downward comparers downplayed their own competence to appear warmer, and upward comparers downplayed their own warmth to appear more competent. In status comparisons with counter-stereotypical targets, Studies 2a and 2b showed impression management...
Published on Jun 1, 2015in Psychological Science4.90
Irene Scopelliti6
Estimated H-index: 6
(City University London),
George Loewenstein103
Estimated H-index: 103
(CMU: Carnegie Mellon University),
Joachim Vosgerau11
Estimated H-index: 11
(Bocconi University)
People engage in self-promotional behavior because they want others to hold favorable images of them. Self-promotion, however, entails a trade-off between conveying one’s positive attributes and being seen as bragging. We propose that people get this trade-off wrong because they erroneously project their own feelings onto their interaction partners. As a consequence, people overestimate the extent to which recipients of their self-promotion will feel proud of and happy for them, and underestimat...
Published on Jan 1, 2015in Journal of Personality and Social Psychology5.92
Arnold K. Ho14
Estimated H-index: 14
(UM: University of Michigan),
Jim Sidanius53
Estimated H-index: 53
(Harvard University)
+ 5 AuthorsAndrew L. Stewart9
Estimated H-index: 9
(Clark University)
A new conceptualization and measurement of social dominance orientation-individual differences in the preference for group based hierarchy and inequality-is introduced. In contrast to previous measures of social dominance orientation that were designed to be unidimensional, the new measure (SDO7) embeds theoretically grounded subdimensions of SDO-SDO-Dominance (SDO-D) and SDO-Egalitarianism (SDO-E). SDO-D constitutes a preference for systems of group-based dominance in which high status groups f...
Published on Jan 1, 2015in Social Psychology1.36
Nicolas Kervyn de Meerendré1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Susan T. Fiske83
Estimated H-index: 83
,
Vincent Yzerbyt49
Estimated H-index: 49
The Stereotype Content Model (SCM) posits two fundamental dimensions of intergroup perception, warmth and competence, predicted by socio-structural dimensions of competition and status, respectively. However, the SCM has been challenged on claiming perceived competition as the socio-structural dimension that predicts perceived warmth. The current research improves by broadening warmth’s predictor (competition) to include both realistic and symbolic threat from Integrated Threat Theory (Study 1)....
Published on Oct 1, 2014in Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin2.60
Nour Sami Kteily14
Estimated H-index: 14
(NU: Northwestern University),
Sarah Cotterill4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Harvard University)
+ 2 AuthorsRobin Bergh7
Estimated H-index: 7
(Uppsala University)
We investigated individual difference predictors of ascribing ingroup characteristics to negative and positive ambiguous targets. Studies 1 and 2 investigated events involving negative targets whos ...
Cited By1
Newest
Published on Sep 10, 2019in Perspectives on Psychological Science8.19
Michael W. Kraus24
Estimated H-index: 24
,
Ivuoma N. Onyeador1
Estimated H-index: 1
+ 2 AuthorsJennifer A. Richeson36
Estimated H-index: 36
(Yale University)
Racial economic inequality is a foundational feature of the United States, yet many Americans appear oblivious to it. In the present work we consider the psychology underlying this collective willf...
Published on Aug 20, 2019in Current Directions in Psychological Science4.48
Cory J. Clark6
Estimated H-index: 6
(Durham University),
Brittany S. Liu4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Kalamazoo College)
+ 1 AuthorsPeter H. Ditto36
Estimated H-index: 36
(UCI: University of California, Irvine)
Humans evolved in the context of intense intergroup competition, and groups comprised of loyal members more often succeeded than groups comprised of nonloyal members. Therefore, selective pressures...
Published on Jul 1, 2019in Current opinion in psychology
Nour Sami Kteily14
Estimated H-index: 14
(NU: Northwestern University),
Kaylene McClanahan1
Estimated H-index: 1
(NU: Northwestern University)
Human societies are organized into group-based hierarchies, with some groups enjoying the privileges of being on top and others struggling at the bottom. The position groups occupy in the hierarchy fundamentally shape their psychology, influencing their perception of and orientation towards the status quo and their perspectives and needs in conflict. Despite a growing body of interventions designed to reduce group-based conflict, the role of group power in shaping the effectiveness of these appr...
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