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Implementation and Long-Term Evaluation of a Hearing Aid Supported Tinnitus Treatment Using Notched Environmental Sounds

Published on Jan 1, 2019in IEEE Journal of Translational Engineering in Health and Medicine
· DOI :10.1109/JTEHM.2019.2897570
Lars Haab6
Estimated H-index: 6
(Saarland University),
Caroline Lehser (Saarland University)+ 4 AuthorsDaniel J. Strauss16
Estimated H-index: 16
(Saarland University)
Abstract
Recent work has shown that sharp spectral edges in acoustic stimuli might have advantageous effects in the treatment of tonal tinnitus. In the course of this paper, we evaluate the long-term effects of spectrally notched hearing aids on the subjective tinnitus distress. By merging recent experimental work with a computational tinnitus model, we modified the commercially available behind-the-ear hearing aids so that a frequency band of 0.5 octaves, centered on the patient’s individual tinnitus frequency, was blocked out. Those hearing aids employ a steep notch filter that filters environmental sounds to suppress the tinnitus-related changes in neural firing by lateral inhibition. The computational model reveals a renormalization of pathologically increased neural response reliability and synchrony in response to spectrally modified input. The target group, fitted with spectrally notched hearing aids, was matched with a comparable control group, fitted with standard hearing aids of the same type but without a notch filter. We analyze the subjective self-assessment by tinnitus questionnaires, and we monitor the objective distress correlates in auditory evoked response phase data. Both, subjective and objective results show a noticeable trend of a larger therapeutic benefit for notched hearing correction.
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Published on Feb 1, 2017in Clinical Otolaryngology 2.70
Daniel J. Strauss16
Estimated H-index: 16
(Saarland University),
Farah I. Corona-Strauss10
Estimated H-index: 10
(Saarland University)
+ 2 AuthorsRonny Hannemann4
Estimated H-index: 4
3 Citations Source Cite
Published on Dec 1, 2016in BMC Neurology 2.17
Alwina Stein6
Estimated H-index: 6
(WWU: University of Münster),
Robert Wunderlich6
Estimated H-index: 6
(WWU: University of Münster)
+ 7 AuthorsChristo Pantev60
Estimated H-index: 60
(WWU: University of Münster)
Background Tinnitus is a result of hyper-activity/hyper-synchrony of auditory neurons coding the tinnitus frequency, which has developed due to synchronous mass activity owing to the lack of inhibition. We assume that removal of exactly these frequencies from a complex auditory stimulus will cause the brain to reorganize around tonotopic regions coding the tinnitus frequency through inhibition-induced plasticity. Based on this assumption, a novel treatment for tonal tinnitus - tailor-made notche...
29 Citations Source Cite
Published on Sep 25, 2015in PLOS ONE 2.77
Robert Wunderlich6
Estimated H-index: 6
,
Pia Lau6
Estimated H-index: 6
+ 4 AuthorsChristo Pantev60
Estimated H-index: 60
Tinnitus, the ringing in the ears that is unrelated to any external source, causes a significant loss in quality of life, involving sleep disturbance and depression for 1 to 3% of the general population. While in the first place tinnitus may be triggered by damage to the inner ear cells, the neural generators of subjective tinnitus are located in central regions of the nervous system. A loss of lateral inhibition, tonotopical reorganization and a gain-increase in response to the sensory deprivat...
12 Citations Source Cite
Published on Aug 27, 2015in eLife 7.62
Shuang Li4
Estimated H-index: 4
(University of Pittsburgh),
Bopanna I. Kalappa9
Estimated H-index: 9
(University of Pittsburgh),
Thanos Tzounopoulos14
Estimated H-index: 14
(University of Pittsburgh)
Tinnitus is often described as ‘ringing in the ears’. Though the phantom sounds, which are heard in the absence of any genuine external noise, can take a variety of forms including buzzing, whistling, or humming. While training the brain to pay less attention to these internally generated sounds can sometimes reduce the impact of tinnitus, many people find that the disorder reduces their quality of life significantly. One of the main causes of tinnitus is prolonged or repeated exposure to excess...
27 Citations Source Cite
Published on Aug 1, 2015 in EMBC (International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society)
Caroline Lehser (Saarland University), Ronny Hannemann4
Estimated H-index: 4
+ 4 AuthorsHarald Seidler6
Estimated H-index: 6
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Published on Sep 12, 2014in Frontiers in Neuroscience 3.88
Susann Deike7
Estimated H-index: 7
(Leibniz Institute for Neurobiology),
Susan L. Denham19
Estimated H-index: 19
(Plymouth University),
Elyse Sussman35
Estimated H-index: 35
(Albert Einstein College of Medicine)
In natural environments, the auditory system is typically confronted with a mixture of sounds originating from different sound sources. The sounds emanating from different sources can overlap each other in time and feature space. Thus, the auditory system has to continuously decompose competing sounds into distinct meaningful auditory objects or “auditory streams” associated with the possible sound sources. This decomposition of the sounds, termed “Auditory scene analysis” (ASA) by Bregman (1990...
1 Citations Source Cite
Published on Dec 9, 2013in PLOS ONE 2.77
Alwina Stein6
Estimated H-index: 6
,
Alva Engell6
Estimated H-index: 6
+ 5 AuthorsChristo Pantev60
Estimated H-index: 60
We investigated the modulation of lateral inhibition in the human auditory cortex by means of magnetoencephalography (MEG). In the first experiment, five acoustic masking stimuli (MS), consisting of noise passing through a digital notch filter which was centered at 1 kHz, were presented. The spectral energy contrasts of four MS were modified systematically by either amplifying or attenuating the edge-frequency bands around the notch (EFB) by 30 dB. Additionally, the width of EFB amplification/at...
10 Citations Source Cite
Published on Aug 1, 2012 in EMBC (International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society)
Lars Haab6
Estimated H-index: 6
(Saarland University),
M. Scheerer1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Saarland University)
+ 2 AuthorsDaniel J. Strauss16
Estimated H-index: 16
(Saarland University)
The pathogenesis of tinnitus involves multiple hierarchical levels of auditory processing and appraisal of sensory saliency. Early tinnitus onset is most likely attributed to homeostatic plasticity in the periphery, while the chronification and decompensation are tightly linked to brain areas for the allocation of attentional resources, such as e.g., the thalamocortical feedback loops and the limbic system. Increased spontaneous firing after sensory deafferentation might be sufficient to generat...
6 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 2012in Frontiers in Systems Neuroscience
Roland Schaette14
Estimated H-index: 14
(UCL: University College London),
Richard Kempter28
Estimated H-index: 28
(Humboldt University of Berlin)
The understanding of tinnitus has progressed considerably in the past decade, but the details of the mechanisms that give rise to this phantom perception of sound without a corresponding acoustic stimulus have not yet been pinpointed. It is now clear that tinnitus is generated in the brain, not in the ear, and that it is correlated with pathologically altered spontaneous activity of neurons in the central auditory system. Both increased spontaneous firing rates and increased neuronal synchrony h...
41 Citations Source Cite
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