Match!

Uptake of trace elements by baryte during copper ore processing: A case study from Olympic Dam, South Australia

Published on May 1, 2019in Minerals Engineering3.315
· DOI :10.1016/J.MINENG.2019.02.034
Danielle S. Schmandt4
Estimated H-index: 4
(University of Adelaide),
Nigel J. Cook36
Estimated H-index: 36
(University of Adelaide)
+ 5 AuthorsVadim S. Kamenetsky57
Estimated H-index: 57
(UTAS: University of Tasmania)
Abstract
Baryte is a common gangue mineral in many ore systems. Here, we report on a study of baryte chemistry in samples of ore and processing materials (flotation feed, flotation concentrate, flotation tailings, concentrate leach discharge, and tailings leach discharge) from the Olympic Dam Cu-U-Au-Ag deposit, South Australia. Elements that commonly substitute for Ba in the baryte lattice, including Sr and Ca, are measured in variable concentrations reflecting grain-scale zonation and heterogeneity at the scale of the deposit but appear unaffected during processing. Variation in the concentration of some other elements, notably Cu, reflect both the heterogeneous nature of flotation feed and the intimately intergrown character of the sulfide-sulfate assemblage. Measured Pb concentrations in baryte progressively increase during processing from flotation feed to flotation concentrate, and particularly in concentrate leach discharge. Such data suggest that, during sulfuric acid leaching, baryte contained within the concentrate is able to incorporate quantities of Pb that have been mobilized during break-down of Pb-bearing minerals (notably U-minerals containing radiogenic lead). This takes place via surface adsorption followed by rapid coupled dissolution-replacement driven incorporation throughout the grain. Results suggest that baryte may scavenge non-target elements during processing and contribute to an understanding of mobility, mineralogical location, and evolution in the deportment of radionuclides through the processing cycle.
  • References (44)
  • Citations (7)
📖 Papers frequently viewed together
1,044 Citations
17.7k Citations
10 Citations
78% of Scinapse members use related papers. After signing in, all features are FREE.
References44
Newest
Cited By7
Newest
#1Germán VelásquezH-Index: 4
#2Humberto EstayH-Index: 4
Last. Marcial PabloH-Index: 1
view all 5 authors...
Sulfides extracted from porphyry-type deposits can contain a number of metals critical for the global energy transition, e.g., Co and precious metals such as Au and Re. These metals are currently determined on composite mineral samples, which commonly results in their dilution. Thus, it is possible that some metals of interest are overlooked during metallurgical processing and are subsequently lost to tailings. Here, an advanced geochemical characterization is implemented directly on metal-beari...
Source
#1Mark Rollog (University of Adelaide)H-Index: 4
#2Nigel J. Cook (University of Adelaide)H-Index: 36
Last. Matt R. Kilburn (UWA: University of Western Australia)H-Index: 32
view all 5 authors...
Abstract Some iron oxide-copper-gold (IOCG) deposits contain variable amounts of uranium. Developing mineral deportment models for the radiogenic isotopes resulting from decay of 238U presents a singular technical challenge, as concentrations of 226Ra, 210Pb, and 210Po fall far below the detection limits achievable for most in situ analytical methodologies. The nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry (nanoSIMS) platform combines low detection limits with sub-micron resolution, revealing previo...
1 CitationsSource
#1Germán VelásquezH-Index: 4
#2Daniel CarrizoH-Index: 1
Last. Agustín PérezH-Index: 1
view all 6 authors...
High-resolution mineral characterization performed on mine material from a giant porphyry copper deposit shows that critical and precious metals, such as cobalt, lanthanum, gold, silver, and tellurium, are concentrated in pyrite in the form of visible micro-inclusions, invisible mineral nano-inclusions, and trace metals in the mineral lattice. Visible and invisible inclusions consist of Ag-Au-Te sulfosalt and monazite-(La) particles. Trace metal concentrations grade up to 24,000 g/t for cobalt, ...
1 CitationsSource
#1Nicholas D. Owen (University of Adelaide)H-Index: 3
#2Nigel J. Cook (University of Adelaide)H-Index: 36
Last. Paul Guagliardo (UWA: University of Western Australia)H-Index: 13
view all 10 authors...
3 CitationsSource
#1Mark Rollog (University of Adelaide)H-Index: 4
#2Nigel J. Cook (University of Adelaide)H-Index: 36
Last. Matt R. Kilburn (UWA: University of Western Australia)H-Index: 32
view all 5 authors...
Abstract Olympic Dam hosts >80 million tonnes of copper, as copper‑iron sulphides, within hematite-dominant gangue. Processing of the relatively fine-grained copper ore is complicated by the presence of by-product uranium and its radiogenic isotopes, in particular 226Ra, 210Pb and 210Po, which partially recover to the final copper sulphide concentrates. Although the majority (~85%) of the U-bearing minerals (uraninite, coffinite, brannerite, thorianite, thorite) are recovered to flotation tailin...
1 CitationsSource
#1Mark Rollog (University of Adelaide)H-Index: 4
#2Nigel J. Cook (University of Adelaide)H-Index: 36
Last. Matt R. Kilburn (UWA: University of Western Australia)H-Index: 32
view all 6 authors...
Production of radionuclide-free copper concentrates is dependent on understanding and controlling the deportment of daughter radionuclides (RNs) produced from 238U decay, specifically 226Ra, 210Pb, and 210Po. Sulfuric acid leaching is currently employed in the Olympic Dam processing plant (South Australia) to remove U and fluorine from copper concentrates prior to smelting but does not adequately remove the aforementioned RN. Due to chemical similarities between lead and alkaline earth metals (i...
2 CitationsSource
#1Mark Rollog (University of Adelaide)H-Index: 4
#2Nigel J. Cook (University of Adelaide)H-Index: 36
Last. Matt R. KilburnH-Index: 32
view all 6 authors...
Many analytical techniques for trace element analysis are available to the geochemist and geometallurgist to understand and, ideally, quantify the distribution of trace and minor components in a mineral deposit. Bulk trace element data are useful, but do not provide information regarding specific host minerals—or lack thereof, in cases of surface adherence or fracture fill—for each element. The CAMECA nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometer (nanoSIMS) 50 and 50L instruments feature ultra-low m...
7 CitationsSource