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Uptake of trace elements by baryte during copper ore processing: A case study from Olympic Dam, South Australia

Published on May 1, 2019in Minerals Engineering3.31
· DOI :10.1016/j.mineng.2019.02.034
Danielle S. Schmandt1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Nigel J. Cook32
Estimated H-index: 32
+ 5 AuthorsVadim S. Kamenetsky52
Estimated H-index: 52
Cite
Abstract
Baryte is a common gangue mineral in many ore systems. Here, we report on a study of baryte chemistry in samples of ore and processing materials (flotation feed, flotation concentrate, flotation tailings, concentrate leach discharge, and tailings leach discharge) from the Olympic Dam Cu-U-Au-Ag deposit, South Australia. Elements that commonly substitute for Ba in the baryte lattice, including Sr and Ca, are measured in variable concentrations reflecting grain-scale zonation and heterogeneity at the scale of the deposit but appear unaffected during processing. Variation in the concentration of some other elements, notably Cu, reflect both the heterogeneous nature of flotation feed and the intimately intergrown character of the sulfide-sulfate assemblage. Measured Pb concentrations in baryte progressively increase during processing from flotation feed to flotation concentrate, and particularly in concentrate leach discharge. Such data suggest that, during sulfuric acid leaching, baryte contained within the concentrate is able to incorporate quantities of Pb that have been mobilized during break-down of Pb-bearing minerals (notably U-minerals containing radiogenic lead). This takes place via surface adsorption followed by rapid coupled dissolution-replacement driven incorporation throughout the grain. Results suggest that baryte may scavenge non-target elements during processing and contribute to an understanding of mobility, mineralogical location, and evolution in the deportment of radionuclides through the processing cycle.
  • References (44)
  • Citations (1)
Cite
References44
Newest
Published on Jul 30, 2018in Geochemistry-exploration Environment Analysis1.11
Mark Rollog1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Adelaide),
Nigel J. Cook32
Estimated H-index: 32
(University of Adelaide)
+ 2 AuthorsMatt R. Kilburn22
Estimated H-index: 22
(UWA: University of Western Australia)
The nanoSIMS (nanometre-resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry) microanalytical platform is used, for the first time, for direct in situ visualization of medium half-life radionuclide (RN) distributions ( 226 Ra - 1602y; 210 Pb - 22.3y) in copper sulphide-bearing ore and copper sulphide flotation concentrate samples. More than 200 grains have been mapped, all with an Hyperion (H200) RF plasma oxygen ion source. Sufficient counts for masses of interest allowed the generation of maps that stan...
Published on Jun 7, 2019in European Journal of Mineralogy1.66
Enzo Curti10
Estimated H-index: 10
,
Jacinta Xto (EPFL: École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne)+ 3 AuthorsNikolaos I. Prasianakis9
Estimated H-index: 9
Published on Jul 1, 2018in Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta4.26
Yoav O. Rosenberg6
Estimated H-index: 6
(BGU: Ben-Gurion University of the Negev),
Ziv Sade1
Estimated H-index: 1
(BGU: Ben-Gurion University of the Negev),
Jiwchar Ganor25
Estimated H-index: 25
(BGU: Ben-Gurion University of the Negev)
Abstract While the precipitation paths of the major ions (i.e., Ca 2+ , Na + , K + , Cl − and SO 4 2− ) during seawater evaporation have been extensively studied, the precipitation of minor solutes from evaporated seawater was not thoroughly studied. The present study aims to achieve a quantitative understanding of Sr 2+ , Ba 2+ and Ra 2+ removal from evaporated seawater, by exploring in-situ evaporation of seawater in a series of ponds of a salt plant. Seawater samples, at various degrees of ev...
Published on Jul 1, 2018in Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta4.26
Frank Heberling13
Estimated H-index: 13
(KIT: Karlsruhe Institute of Technology),
V. Metz8
Estimated H-index: 8
(KIT: Karlsruhe Institute of Technology)
+ 2 AuthorsH. Geckeis30
Estimated H-index: 30
(KIT: Karlsruhe Institute of Technology)
Abstract Despite the long history of studies on (Ba,Ra)SO 4 , various recent investigations aimed at improving our understanding of its formation processes and thermodynamics. Accumulation of natural Ra isotopes (mainly 226 Ra and 228 Ra) in (Ba,Ra)SO 4 plays an important role in many geotechnical applications and water desalination facilities. In the near field of a nuclear waste repository, barite formation may be expected e.g. as a consequence of contact of spent nuclear fuel or vitrified hig...
Published on May 13, 2018in Minerals2.25
Nigel J. Cook32
Estimated H-index: 32
,
Kathy Ehrig13
Estimated H-index: 13
+ 6 AuthorsS.R. Grano26
Estimated H-index: 26
The distributions of 210Pb and 210Po, short half-life products of 238U decay, in geological and related anthropogenic materials are reviewed, with emphasis on their geochemical behaviours and likely mineral hosts. Concentrations of natural 210Pb and 210Po in igneous and related hydrothermal environments are governed by release from crustal reservoirs. 210Po may undergo volatilisation, inducing disequilibrium in magmatic systems. In sedimentary environments (marine, lacustrine, deltaic and fluvia...
Published on Feb 13, 2018in Minerals2.25
Nicholas D. Owen1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Cristiana L. Ciobanu28
Estimated H-index: 28
+ 2 AuthorsA. Basak11
Estimated H-index: 11
Symplectites comprising clausthalite (PbSe) and host Cu-(Fe)-sulphides (chalcocite, bornite, and chalcopyrite) are instructive for constraining the genesis of Cu-Au-(U) ores if adequately addressed at the nanoscale. The present study is carried out on samples representative of all three Cu-(Fe)-sulphides displaying clausthalite inclusions that vary in size, from a few µm down to the nm-scale ( 265 °C. A minimum temperature of 165 °C is considered for clausthalite-bearing symplectites from the re...
Published on Feb 1, 2018in Applied Geochemistry2.89
Victor Vinograd16
Estimated H-index: 16
,
Dmitrii A. Kulik21
Estimated H-index: 21
+ 4 AuthorsDirk Bosbach28
Estimated H-index: 28
• The mixing parameters of the (Ba,Sr,Ra)SO 4 solid solution are determined from first principles.
Published on Dec 1, 2017in Ore Geology Reviews3.39
Max R. Verdugo-Ihl2
Estimated H-index: 2
(University of Adelaide),
Cristiana L. Ciobanu28
Estimated H-index: 28
(University of Adelaide)
+ 3 AuthorsSe Gilbert15
Estimated H-index: 15
(University of Adelaide)
Abstract The textural characteristics and trace element geochemistry of hematite with U-W-Sn-Mo signatures from the Cu-U-Au-Ag orebody at Olympic Dam, South Australia, are documented. Olympic Dam is the archetype for iron-oxide copper–gold (IOCG) deposits where hematite is by far the most abundant mineral in the orebody. The deposit is located within hematite-bearing breccias (>5% Fe) hosted by the ∼1.6 Ga Roxby Downs Granite (RDG). Although such breccias are mostly derived from RDG, they also i...
Published on Dec 1, 2017in Mineralogical Magazine2.21
Edeltraud Macmillan5
Estimated H-index: 5
,
Nigel J. Cook32
Estimated H-index: 32
+ 1 AuthorsAllan Pring29
Estimated H-index: 29
(Flinders University)
The Olympic Dam iron-oxide copper-gold-silver-uranium deposit, South Australia, contains three dominant U minerals: uraninite; coffinite; and brannerite. Microanalytical and petrographic observations provide evidence for an interpretation in which brannerite and coffinite essentially represent the products of U mineralizing events after initial deposit formation at 1.6 Ga. Marked compositional and textural differences between the various types of brannerite and coffinite highlight the role of mu...
Published on Oct 1, 2017in Applied Geochemistry2.89
Victor Vinograd16
Estimated H-index: 16
,
Dmitrii A. Kulik21
Estimated H-index: 21
(Paul Scherrer Institute)
+ 4 AuthorsDirk Bosbach28
Estimated H-index: 28
Abstract The effect of temperature on the solid solution – aqueous solution (SS-AS) equilibria in the (Ba,Sr,Ra)SO 4 +H 2 O system is primarily determined by a change in the aqueous solubilities of the end members BaSO 4 , SrSO 4 and RaSO 4. The dependence of the solubility vs. the temperature for an MSO 4 sulphate is, in turn, determined by the entropy and the heat capacity effects of the reaction MSO 4 = M 2+ + SO 4 2− . The missing data for M = Ra are estimated here by a combination of atomis...
Cited By1
Newest
Published on Dec 1, 2019in Geochemical Transactions2.62
Mark Rollog1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Adelaide),
Nigel J. Cook32
Estimated H-index: 32
(University of Adelaide)
+ 3 AuthorsMatt R. Kilburn22
Estimated H-index: 22
(UWA: University of Western Australia)
Production of radionuclide-free copper concentrates is dependent on understanding and controlling the deportment of daughter radionuclides (RNs) produced from 238U decay, specifically 226Ra, 210Pb, and 210Po. Sulfuric acid leaching is currently employed in the Olympic Dam processing plant (South Australia) to remove U and fluorine from copper concentrates prior to smelting but does not adequately remove the aforementioned RN. Due to chemical similarities between lead and alkaline earth metals (i...
Published on Sep 1, 2019in Hydrometallurgy3.46
Mark Rollog1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Adelaide),
Nigel J. Cook32
Estimated H-index: 32
(University of Adelaide)
+ 2 AuthorsMatt R. Kilburn22
Estimated H-index: 22
(UWA: University of Western Australia)
Abstract Olympic Dam hosts >80 million tonnes of copper, as copper‑iron sulphides, within hematite-dominant gangue. Processing of the relatively fine-grained copper ore is complicated by the presence of by-product uranium and its radiogenic isotopes, in particular 226Ra, 210Pb and 210Po, which partially recover to the final copper sulphide concentrates. Although the majority (~85%) of the U-bearing minerals (uraninite, coffinite, brannerite, thorianite, thorite) are recovered to flotation tailin...
Published on May 30, 2019in Minerals2.25
Mark Rollog1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Nigel J. Cook32
Estimated H-index: 32
+ 3 AuthorsMatt R. Kilburn22
Estimated H-index: 22
Many analytical techniques for trace element analysis are available to the geochemist and geometallurgist to understand and, ideally, quantify the distribution of trace and minor components in a mineral deposit. Bulk trace element data are useful, but do not provide information regarding specific host minerals—or lack thereof, in cases of surface adherence or fracture fill—for each element. The CAMECA nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometer (nanoSIMS) 50 and 50L instruments feature ultra-low m...
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