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What causes a Business and Management Education article to be cited: Article, author, or journal?

Published on Mar 1, 2019in The International Journal of Management Education
· DOI :10.1016/j.ijme.2019.01.005
Alvin Hwang13
Estimated H-index: 13
(Pace University),
J. B. Arbaugh28
Estimated H-index: 28
(University of Wisconsin–Oshkosh)
+ 2 AuthorsCharles J. Fornaciari13
Estimated H-index: 13
(La Salle University)
Sources
Abstract
Abstract Discipline-specific research has a rich history in assessing journal article impact and factors that affect article citation patterns. In contrast, Business and Management Education (BME) research lacks such a history due to its relative youth as an independent discipline, its still fragmented literature, and significant variations in the types of articles it publishes. If BME scholarship is to advance as a unified and impactful domain, its scholars need to uncover factors that affect citations of its articles, as has been done in traditional business disciplines. This paper offers guidance to BME authors about factors that can potentially affect the citations of their research. It also offers advice to BME editors on ways to improve the stature of their journals. Inspired by Judge, Cable, Colbert, & Rynes' (2007) work on citation predictors in management research, we developed a model to predict citations of BME articles. Our findings showed that an author's h-index, a journal's recent h-index, and the number of references in an article are significant predictors of BME article citations. Article type, such as literature reviews and conceptual pieces did not predict BME article citation, in part because so few of them have been done for this field.
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