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A fully feathered enantiornithine foot and wing fragment preserved in mid-Cretaceous Burmese amber

Published on Jan 30, 2019in Scientific Reports4.01
· DOI :10.1038/s41598-018-37427-4
Lida Xing18
Estimated H-index: 18
(China University of Geosciences),
Ryan C. McKellar12
Estimated H-index: 12
(KU: University of Kansas)
+ 3 AuthorsLuis M. Chiappe45
Estimated H-index: 45
(Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County)
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Abstract
Over the last three years, Burmese amber (~99 Ma, from Myanmar) has provided a series of immature enantiornithine skeletal remains preserved in varying developmental stages and degrees of completeness. These specimens have improved our knowledge based on compression fossils in Cretaceous sedimentary rocks, adding details of three-dimensional structure and soft tissues that are rarely preserved elsewhere. Here we describe a remarkably well-preserved foot, accompanied by part of the wing plumage. These body parts were likely dismembered, entering the resin due to predatory or scavenging behaviour by a larger animal. The new specimen preserves contour feathers on the pedal phalanges together with enigmatic scutellae scale filament (SSF) feathers on the foot, providing direct analogies to the plumage patterns observed in modern birds, and those cultivated through developmental manipulation studies. Ultimately, this connection may allow researchers to observe how filamentous dinosaur ‘protofeathers’ developed—testing theories using evolutionary holdovers in modern birds.
  • References (44)
  • Citations (2)
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References44
Newest
#1Danielle DhouaillyH-Index: 25
#2Pascal Godefroit (Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences)H-Index: 20
Last.Olav T. Oftedal (SERC: Smithsonian Environmental Research Center)H-Index: 12
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#1Fabien Knoll (University of Manchester)H-Index: 15
#2Luis M. Chiappe (Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County)H-Index: 45
Last.Francisco Serrano (UMA: University of Málaga)H-Index: 3
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#1Lida Xing (China University of Geosciences)H-Index: 18
#2Michael W. Caldwell (U of A: University of Alberta)H-Index: 32
Last.Hongliang Shi (BFU: Beijing Forestry University)H-Index: 1
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#1Ping Wu (SC: University of Southern California)H-Index: 23
#2Jie Yan (SC: University of Southern California)H-Index: 3
Last.Wen-Hsiung Li (AS: Academia Sinica)H-Index: 94
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#1Lida Xing (China University of Geosciences)H-Index: 18
#2Jingmai K. O'Connor (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 22
Last.LIGang (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 16
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#1Lida Xing (China University of Geosciences)H-Index: 18
#2Jingmai K. O'Connor (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 22
Last.Ming Bai (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 15
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#1Lida Xing (China University of Geosciences)H-Index: 18
#2Ryan C. McKellar (University of Regina)H-Index: 5
Last.Alexander P. Wolfe (U of A: University of Alberta)H-Index: 47
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#1Lida Xing (China University of Geosciences)H-Index: 18
#2Ryan C. McKellar (University of Regina)H-Index: 5
Last.MartinGLockley (University of Colorado Denver)H-Index: 38
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Cited By2
Newest
#1Lida Xing (China University of Geosciences)H-Index: 18
#2Jingmai K. O’Connor (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 9
Last.Fuming Lei (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
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View next paperA flattened enantiornithine in mid-Cretaceous Burmese amber: morphology and preservation