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Student perceptions of non-native English speaking tutors at a writing center in Japan

Published on Jun 1, 2019in Journal of Second Language Writing 4.20
· DOI :10.1016/j.jslw.2019.01.002
Tomoyo Okuda1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UBC: University of British Columbia)
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Abstract
Abstract In writing center studies, research has mainly focused on interactions between native English-speaking tutors and their tutees, and there remains a paucity of research exploring identities and challenges of non-native English speaking writing center tutors. Drawing on notions of student stances and motives from peer feedback research, this study investigated how Japanese graduate student writers evaluated their English writing tutorials with non-native tutors at a Japanese university. Four tutoring sessions were audio-recorded and post-tutorial interviews were conducted with both tutors and tutees to examine their stances and motives. In analyzing the data, it was found that certain conditions needed to be met for the positive evaluation of tutorials with non-native tutors: (a) the match between tutor and tutee motives, (b) tutees’ preference of particular tutoring strategies, and (c) a trust in the tutor’s writing, but not necessarily their language expertise. The findings suggest that what played into these conditions was the tutor’s projected stance as a non-native tutor with expertise in higher-order issues (e.g., textual organization and coherence), which impacted their display of knowledge and tutees’ perceptions.
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Shulin Yu7
Estimated H-index: 7
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Icy Lee22
Estimated H-index: 22
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Cynthia Lee8
Estimated H-index: 8
(HKU: University of Hong Kong)
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Shulin Yu7
Estimated H-index: 7
(UM: University of Macau),
Icy Lee22
Estimated H-index: 22
(CUHK: The Chinese University of Hong Kong)
While the last three decades have witnessed a growing body of research on peer feedback in first language (L1) and second language (L2) writing, research about students’ motives for participating in group peer feedback has remained underexplored. In order to fill this important gap, this case study, guided by the constructs of activity and motive in activity theory, investigates two Chinese university students’ motives for participating in group peer feedback activities in the EFL (English as a ...
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Ali Fuad Selvi5
Estimated H-index: 5
(Middle East Technical University Northern Cyprus Campus)
Parallel to the growing recognition of English as an international language, the fundamental premises of the TESOL discipline (e.g., the ownership of the language, native speakers as a goal and model of competence for learning and teaching, linguistic standards and language variety/ies to be taught, monolingual/monocultural approach to teaching) has undergone a serious challenge and reconceptualization over the past several decades. While this trend resulted in an unprecedented recognition of th...
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Maiko Nakatake1
Estimated H-index: 1
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Wei Zhu1
Estimated H-index: 1
(USF: University of South Florida),
Deborah A. Mitchell1
Estimated H-index: 1
(USF: University of South Florida)
This article reports a case study that examined English as a Second Language students' peer response stances from an activity theory perspective. More specifically, the study was guided by the constructs of activity and motive/object in Leont'ev's theory. Multiple sources of data were collected from two native Spanish-speaking students enrolled in a low-advanced EAP writing class, including recordings of their peer response sessions and individual interviews. An inductive and recursive qualitati...
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Davi S. Reis1
Estimated H-index: 1
How do non-native English-speaking teachers (NNESTs) establish their legitimacy as credible, qualified instructors in the contexts where they teach vis-a-vis the native speaker (NS) myth (Phillipson, Linguistic imperialism, Oxford University Press, 1992)? Using Vygotskian Sociocultural Theory (Vygotsky and Cole, Mind in society: the development of higher psychological processes, Harvard University Press, 1978; Wertsch, Vygotsky and the social formation of mind, Harvard University Press, 1985), t...
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James Mckinley4
Estimated H-index: 4
The installation of English language writing centres in Japanese universities is a relatively recent event—the first ones established with funding from the Ministry of Education in 2004. Because of the EFL writing context, setting up a writing centre requires consideration of students’ needs and cultural expectations of writing and writing centres. In general, writing centres that have been established in Japanese universities follow a structure similar to those in the US. This raises the questi...
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