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Impact of routine use of a spray formulation of bleach on Clostridium difficile spore contamination in non-C difficile infection rooms

Published on Jan 1, 2019in American Journal of Infection Control1.97
· DOI :10.1016/j.ajic.2018.12.023
Yilen Karen Ng Wong , Heba Alhmidi5
Estimated H-index: 5
+ 3 AuthorsCurtis J. Donskey46
Estimated H-index: 46
(Case Western Reserve University)
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Abstract
The frequency of recovery of Clostridium difficile spores from surfaces after postdischarge cleaning of non- C difficile infection rooms was significantly reduced from 24%-5% after a commercial spray formulation of bleach was substituted for a quaternary ammonium disinfectant. These results suggest that routine use of a sporicidal disinfectant in all postdischarge rooms could potentially be beneficial in reducing the risk for C difficile transmission from contaminated surfaces.
  • References (9)
  • Citations (1)
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References9
Newest
Published on Jan 1, 2018in American Journal of Infection Control1.97
Aishat Mustapha2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Case Western Reserve University),
Heba Alhmidi5
Estimated H-index: 5
+ 2 AuthorsCurtis J. Donskey46
Estimated H-index: 46
(Case Western Reserve University)
Recent studies suggest that floors may be an underappreciated source for transmission of health care–associated pathogens. However, there are limited data on the effectiveness of current cleaning and disinfection methods in reducing floor contamination. We demonstrated that manual postdischarge cleaning by environmental services personnel significantly reduced floor contamination, and an automated ultraviolet C room disinfection device was effective as an adjunct to manual cleaning.
Published on Jun 1, 2016in JAMA Internal Medicine20.77
Yves Longtin15
Estimated H-index: 15
(McGill University),
Bianka Paquet-Bolduc2
Estimated H-index: 2
+ 10 AuthorsSimon Lévesque11
Estimated H-index: 11
Importance Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a major cause of health care–associated infection worldwide, and new preventive strategies are urgently needed. Current control measures do not target asymptomatic carriers, despite evidence that they can contaminate the hospital environment and health care workers’ hands and potentially transmit C difficile to other patients. Objective To investigate the effect of detecting and isolating C difficile asymptomatic carriers at hospital admission ...
Published on Mar 1, 2015in Infectious Disease Clinics of North America4.76
Curtis J. Donskey46
Estimated H-index: 46
,
Sirisha Kundrapu15
Estimated H-index: 15
(Case Western Reserve University),
Abhishek Deshpande26
Estimated H-index: 26
(Cleveland Clinic)
Asymptomatic carriage of toxigenic strains of Clostridium difficile is common in health care facilities and the community. However, infection control efforts have traditionally focused almost entirely on symptomatic patients. There is now growing concern that asymptomatic carriers may be an underappreciated source of transmission. This article provides an overview of the pathogenesis and epidemiology of C difficile colonization, reviews the evidence that asymptomatic carriers shed spores and con...
Published on Sep 1, 2014in Journal of Clinical Microbiology4.96
Jennifer L. Cadnum15
Estimated H-index: 15
(Case Western Reserve University),
Kelly Hurless6
Estimated H-index: 6
+ 3 AuthorsCurtis J. Donskey46
Estimated H-index: 46
(Case Western Reserve University)
Effective and easy-to-use methods for detecting Clostridium difficile spore contamination would be useful for identifying environmental reservoirs and monitoring the effectiveness of room disinfection. Culture-based detection methods are sensitive for detecting C. difficile, but their utility is limited due to the requirement of anaerobic culture conditions and microbiological expertise. We developed a low-cost selective broth medium containing thioglycolic acid and l-cystine, termed C. difficil...
Published on Oct 15, 2013in Clinical Infectious Diseases9.05
Scott R. Curry10
Estimated H-index: 10
(University of Pittsburgh),
Carlene A. Muto19
Estimated H-index: 19
(University of Pittsburgh)
+ 4 AuthorsLee H. Harrison83
Estimated H-index: 83
(University of Pittsburgh)
(See the Editorial Commentary by McDonald on pages 1103–5.) Previous studies have established that asymptomatic carriers of Clostridium difficile outnumber symptomatic patients in medical wards [1–4]. Shim et al found that carriers, defined as a patient with at least 2 culture-positive specimens 7 days apart, were at a decreased risk of symptomatic C. difficile infection (CDI) [5]. In one study, C. difficile from carriers appeared subsequently in hospital-associated (HA) CDIs attributable to the...
Published on Oct 1, 2013in Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology2.86
Andrew Zhang3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Case Western Reserve University),
Michelle M. Nerandzic19
Estimated H-index: 19
+ 1 AuthorsCurtis J. Donskey46
Estimated H-index: 46
(Case Western Reserve University)
An organic load of 5%–10% fetal calf serum significantly reduced hypochlorite and UV radiation killing of Clostridium difficile spores, but organic material collected from hospital surfaces did not affect hypochlorite and only modestly affected UV killing of spores. Hypochlorite reduced aerobic microorganisms on unclean surfaces with no wiping. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2013;34(10):1106-1108 Effective cleaning and disinfection of contaminated environmental surfaces and equipment is necessary...
Published on Oct 1, 2013in Journal of Hospital Infection3.70
Dubert M. Guerrero7
Estimated H-index: 7
(Case Western Reserve University),
J.C. Becker1
Estimated H-index: 1
+ 4 AuthorsCurtis J. Donskey46
Estimated H-index: 46
(Case Western Reserve University)
Summary Asymptomatic carriage of Clostridium difficile is common in hospitals, but the risk for transmission by carriers is unclear. In this point prevalence culture survey of asymptomatic hospitalized patients, 18 of 149 (12%) were carriers of toxigenic C. difficile . By comparison with C. difficile infection (CDI) patients, the prevalence of skin and/or environmental contamination was significantly lower in asymptomatic carriers (3/18, 17% versus 5/6, 83%; P = 0.007), but carriers outnumbered ...
Published on Apr 1, 2013in Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology2.86
Jennifer L. Cadnum15
Estimated H-index: 15
(Case Western Reserve University),
Kelly Hurless6
Estimated H-index: 6
+ 1 AuthorsCurtis J. Donskey14
Estimated H-index: 14
(Case Western Reserve University)
Published on Oct 1, 1997in Clinical Microbiology Reviews17.75
William A. Rutala58
Estimated H-index: 58
(UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill),
David J. Weber65
Estimated H-index: 65
(UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)
Hypochlorite has been used as a disinfectant for more than 100 years. It has many of the properties of an ideal disinfectant, including a broad antimicrobial activity, rapid bactericidal action, reasonable persistence in treated potable water, ease of use, solubility in water, relative stability, relative nontoxicity at use concentrations, no poisonous residuals, no color, no staining, and low cost. The active species is undissociated hypochlorous acid (HOCl). Hypochlorites are lethal to most mi...
Cited By1
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Published on Jun 1, 2019in American Journal of Infection Control1.97
Curtis J. Donskey46
Estimated H-index: 46
(Case Western Reserve University)
“No-touch” decontamination devices are increasingly used as an adjunct to standard cleaning and disinfection in health care facilities. Although there is evidence that these devices are effective in reducing contamination, there are several areas of controversy regarding their use. This review addresses some of the questions frequently posed by infection prevention and environmental services personnel about decontamination devices.