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Body Fat Loss Automatically Reduces Lean Mass by Changing the Fat‐Free Component of Adipose Tissue

Published on Mar 1, 2019in Obesity3.97
· DOI :10.1002/oby.22393
Takashi Abe21
Estimated H-index: 21
(University of Mississippi),
Scott J. Dankel15
Estimated H-index: 15
(University of Mississippi),
Jeremy P. Loenneke33
Estimated H-index: 33
(University of Mississippi)
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  • References (7)
  • Citations (3)
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References7
Newest
Published on Jan 1, 2019in Sports Medicine7.58
Takashi Abe21
Estimated H-index: 21
(University of Mississippi),
Jeremy P. Loenneke33
Estimated H-index: 33
(University of Mississippi),
Robert S. Thiebaud23
Estimated H-index: 23
(Texas Wesleyan University)
Fat-free body mass (FFM) is a surrogate for skeletal muscle mass and is often used for the normalization of several physiological variables (e.g., oxygen uptake). However, FFM includes non-skeletal muscle components such as the fat-free component of adipose tissue fat cells. As the amount of adipose tissue mass increases, the FFM will also increase and be included in the measurement of FFM. Therefore, FFM may not be an appropriate indicator of muscle mass when targeting individuals with a large ...
Published on Feb 1, 2018in International Journal of Obesity4.51
David R. Franz1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Dieter Weidlich1
Estimated H-index: 1
+ 8 AuthorsHans Hauner53
Estimated H-index: 53
Association of proton density fat fraction in adipose tissue with imaging-based and anthropometric obesity markers in adults
Published on Jun 1, 2017in Obesity Reviews8.19
Michael A. Wewege3
Estimated H-index: 3
(UNSW: University of New South Wales),
R. van den Berg1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UNSW: University of New South Wales)
+ 1 AuthorsAndrew Keech4
Estimated H-index: 4
(UNSW: University of New South Wales)
SummaryObjective The objective of this study is to compare the effects of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) and moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT) for improvements in body composition in overweight and obese adults. Methods Trials comparing HIIT and MICT in overweight or obese participants aged 18–45 years were included. Direct measures (e.g. whole-body fat mass) and indirect measures (e.g. waist circumference) were examined. Results From 1,334 articles initially screened, 13 we...
Published on May 18, 2017in The New England Journal of Medicine70.67
Dennis T. Villareal44
Estimated H-index: 44
,
Lina E. Aguirre7
Estimated H-index: 7
+ 5 AuthorsClifford R. Quails49
Estimated H-index: 49
BackgroundObesity causes frailty in older adults; however, weight loss might accelerate age-related loss of muscle and bone mass and resultant sarcopenia and osteopenia. MethodsIn this clinical trial involving 160 obese older adults, we evaluated the effectiveness of several exercise modes in reversing frailty and preventing reduction in muscle and bone mass induced by weight loss. Participants were randomly assigned to a weight-management program plus one of three exercise programs — aerobic tr...
Steven B. Heymsfield101
Estimated H-index: 101
(Columbia University),
Dympna Gallagher61
Estimated H-index: 61
(Columbia University)
+ 3 AuthorsStanley Heshka50
Estimated H-index: 50
(Columbia University)
An enduring enigma is why the ratio of resting energy expenditure (REE) to metabolically active tissue mass, expressed as the REE/fat-free mass (FFM) ratio, is greater in magnitude in subjects with a small FFM than it is in subjects with a large FFM. This study tested the hypothesis that a higher REE/FFM ratio in subjects with a small body mass and FFM can be explained by a larger proportion of FFM as high-metabolic-rate tissues compared with that observed in heavier subjects. REE was measured b...
Published on Jan 27, 1999in JAMA51.27
Ross E. Andersen29
Estimated H-index: 29
(Johns Hopkins University),
Thomas A. Wadden102
Estimated H-index: 102
(UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)
+ 3 AuthorsShawn C. Franckowiak15
Estimated H-index: 15
(Johns Hopkins University)
ContextPhysical inactivity contributes to weight gain, but only 22% of Americans are regularly active.ObjectiveTo examine short- and long-term changes in weight, body composition, and cardiovascular risk profiles produced by diet combined with either structured aerobic exercise or moderate-intensity lifestyle activity.DesignSixteen-week randomized controlled trial with 1-year follow-up, conducted from August 1995 to December 1996.Participants and SettingForty obese women (mean body mass index [w...
Cited By3
Newest
Published on Jul 19, 2019in Obesity3.97
Phoenix Hwaung (Pennington Biomedical Research Center), Anja Bosy-Westphal40
Estimated H-index: 40
(CAU: University of Kiel)
+ 5 AuthorsSteven B. Heymsfield62
Estimated H-index: 62
(Pennington Biomedical Research Center)
Published on Jun 1, 2019in Obesity3.97
Takashi Abe21
Estimated H-index: 21
(University of Mississippi),
Scott J. Dankel15
Estimated H-index: 15
(University of Mississippi),
Jeremy P. Loenneke33
Estimated H-index: 33
(University of Mississippi)
Published on Jun 1, 2019in Obesity3.97
Richard F. Burton21
Estimated H-index: 21
(Glas.: University of Glasgow)
Published on Dec 1, 2018in Journal of Clinical Densitometry2.18
Takashi Abe21
Estimated H-index: 21
(University of Mississippi),
Zachary W. Bell3
Estimated H-index: 3
(University of Mississippi)
+ 3 AuthorsJeremy P. Loenneke33
Estimated H-index: 33
(University of Mississippi)
Abstract Fat-free mass as well as lean soft tissue mass is a surrogate for skeletal muscle mass and is often used for the normalization of several physiological variables or for the diagnosing of low muscle mass in older adults. However, both fat-free mass and lean tissue mass include nonskeletal muscle components such as the fat-free component of adipose tissue fat cells. A technique known as water-fat MRI provides a noninvasive and radiation-free assessment of the fat-free component of adipose...
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