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Body Fat Loss Automatically Reduces Lean Mass by Changing the Fat‐Free Component of Adipose Tissue

Published on Mar 1, 2019in Obesity3.969
· DOI :10.1002/oby.22393
Takashi Abe45
Estimated H-index: 45
(University of Mississippi),
Scott J. Dankel16
Estimated H-index: 16
(University of Mississippi),
Jeremy P. Loenneke33
Estimated H-index: 33
(University of Mississippi)
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Abstract
  • References (7)
  • Citations (5)
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References7
Newest
#1Takashi Abe (University of Mississippi)H-Index: 45
#2Jeremy P. Loenneke (University of Mississippi)H-Index: 33
Last. Robert S. Thiebaud (Texas Wesleyan University)H-Index: 24
view all 3 authors...
Fat-free body mass (FFM) is a surrogate for skeletal muscle mass and is often used for the normalization of several physiological variables (e.g., oxygen uptake). However, FFM includes non-skeletal muscle components such as the fat-free component of adipose tissue fat cells. As the amount of adipose tissue mass increases, the FFM will also increase and be included in the measurement of FFM. Therefore, FFM may not be an appropriate indicator of muscle mass when targeting individuals with a large ...
2 CitationsSource
#1Takashi AbeH-Index: 45
#2Robert S. ThiebaudH-Index: 24
Last. Jeremy P. LoennekeH-Index: 33
view all 3 authors...
2 CitationsSource
#1Daniela Franz (TUM: Technische Universität München)H-Index: 6
#2Dominik Weidlich (TUM: Technische Universität München)H-Index: 4
Last. Dimitrios C. Karampinos (TUM: Technische Universität München)H-Index: 25
view all 11 authors...
The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship of the proton density fat fraction (PDFF), measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), of supraclavicular and gluteal adipose tissue with subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissue (SAT and VAT) volumes, liver fat fraction and anthropometric obesity markers. The supraclavicular fossa was selected as a typical location where brown adipocytes may be present in humans and the gluteal region was selected as a typical location enclosing primar...
10 CitationsSource
#1Michael A. Wewege (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 5
#2R. van den Berg (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 1
Last. Andrew Keech (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 5
view all 4 authors...
SummaryObjective The objective of this study is to compare the effects of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) and moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT) for improvements in body composition in overweight and obese adults. Methods Trials comparing HIIT and MICT in overweight or obese participants aged 18–45 years were included. Direct measures (e.g. whole-body fat mass) and indirect measures (e.g. waist circumference) were examined. Results From 1,334 articles initially screened, 13 we...
51 CitationsSource
BackgroundObesity causes frailty in older adults; however, weight loss might accelerate age-related loss of muscle and bone mass and resultant sarcopenia and osteopenia. MethodsIn this clinical trial involving 160 obese older adults, we evaluated the effectiveness of several exercise modes in reversing frailty and preventing reduction in muscle and bone mass induced by weight loss. Participants were randomly assigned to a weight-management program plus one of three exercise programs — aerobic tr...
90 CitationsSource
#1Steven B. Heymsfield (Columbia University)H-Index: 111
#2Dympna Gallagher (Columbia University)H-Index: 42
Last. Stanley Heshka (Columbia University)H-Index: 40
view all 6 authors...
An enduring enigma is why the ratio of resting energy expenditure (REE) to metabolically active tissue mass, expressed as the REE/fat-free mass (FFM) ratio, is greater in magnitude in subjects with a small FFM than it is in subjects with a large FFM. This study tested the hypothesis that a higher REE/FFM ratio in subjects with a small body mass and FFM can be explained by a larger proportion of FFM as high-metabolic-rate tissues compared with that observed in heavier subjects. REE was measured b...
156 CitationsSource
#1Ross E. Andersen (Johns Hopkins University)H-Index: 29
#2Thomas A. Wadden (UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)H-Index: 104
Last. Shawn C. Franckowiak (Johns Hopkins University)H-Index: 11
view all 6 authors...
ContextPhysical inactivity contributes to weight gain, but only 22% of Americans are regularly active.ObjectiveTo examine short- and long-term changes in weight, body composition, and cardiovascular risk profiles produced by diet combined with either structured aerobic exercise or moderate-intensity lifestyle activity.DesignSixteen-week randomized controlled trial with 1-year follow-up, conducted from August 1995 to December 1996.Participants and SettingForty obese women (mean body mass index [w...
545 CitationsSource
Cited By5
Newest
#2E. A. RozhkovaH-Index: 1
view all 6 authors...
The aim of the research is to study quantitative representation and features of adipose component distribution in girls of 16–20 years of age having different constitutional properties. Material and methods. In the investigated Slavic ethnos groups of 250 girls of 16–17 years of age and 250 girls of 18–20 years of age having no signs of pathological processes disturbing physical development dynamics absolute content of body’s adipose component and topographical features of subcutaneous fat distr...
Source
#1Takashi Abe (University of Mississippi)H-Index: 45
#2Scott J. Dankel (Rowan University)H-Index: 1
Last. Jeremy P. Loenneke (University of Mississippi)H-Index: 33
view all 10 authors...
Previous studies proposed calf circumference cutoff values for predicting dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA)-derived low muscle mass. However, DXA-derived appendicular lean mass (aLM) includes non-skeletal muscle components such as the appendicular fat-free component of adipose tissue fat cells (aFFAT). The purpose of this study was to compare the calf circumference method of classification before (Model #1) and after (Model #2) eliminating the influence of FFAT in healthy Japanese adults (5...
Source
#1Phoenix Hwaung (Pennington Biomedical Research Center)H-Index: 1
#2Anja Bosy-Westphal (CAU: University of Kiel)H-Index: 41
Last. Steven B. Heymsfield (Pennington Biomedical Research Center)H-Index: 17
view all 8 authors...
Source
#1Takashi Abe (University of Mississippi)H-Index: 45
#2Scott J. Dankel (University of Mississippi)H-Index: 16
Last. Jeremy P. Loenneke (University of Mississippi)H-Index: 33
view all 3 authors...
Source
#1Richard F. Burton (Glas.: University of Glasgow)H-Index: 21
Source
#1Takashi Abe (University of Mississippi)H-Index: 45
#2Zachary W. Bell (University of Mississippi)H-Index: 4
Last. Jeremy P. Loenneke (University of Mississippi)H-Index: 33
view all 6 authors...
Abstract Fat-free mass as well as lean soft tissue mass is a surrogate for skeletal muscle mass and is often used for the normalization of several physiological variables or for the diagnosing of low muscle mass in older adults. However, both fat-free mass and lean tissue mass include nonskeletal muscle components such as the fat-free component of adipose tissue fat cells. A technique known as water-fat MRI provides a noninvasive and radiation-free assessment of the fat-free component of adipose...
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