Match!

24 Organizational Culture and Climate

Published on Sep 26, 2012
· DOI :10.1002/9781118133880.hop212024
Cheri Ostroff18
Estimated H-index: 18
(UMD: University of Maryland, College Park),
Angelo J. Kinicki39
Estimated H-index: 39
(ASU: Arizona State University),
Rabiah S. Muhammad3
Estimated H-index: 3
(UMD: University of Maryland, College Park)
Cite
Abstract
Our focus is on organizational culture and climate and the role these constructs play in understanding individual as well as collective attitudes, behavior, and performance. We begin with the assumption that both constructs rest upon the notion of shared meanings or a shared understanding of aspects of the organizational context. Climate is defined as a perceptually based description of what the organization is like in terms of practices, policies, procedures and routines while culture helps define the underlying reasons and mechanisms for why these things occur in an organization based on fundamental ideologies, assumptions, values, and artifacts. In the first half of the chapter, the culture and climate literatures are reviewed. The second half is framed around a multi-level model that integrates culture and climate through the linking mechanism of organizational structure, practices, and policies. This discussion elucidates a set of mechanisms that foster the emergence of organizational culture and climate, delineates different types of strength, and highlights the impact of weak emergent processes on outcomes. We then discuss the topic of culture and climate change and conclude by reviewing directions for future research. Keywords: organizational culture; organizational climate; levels of analysis; emergent processes; leadership
  • References (169)
  • Citations (8)
Cite
References169
Newest
Jeroen Delmotte8
Estimated H-index: 8
(Katholieke Universiteit Leuven),
Sophie De Winne10
Estimated H-index: 10
(Katholieke Universiteit Leuven),
Luc Sels28
Estimated H-index: 28
(Katholieke Universiteit Leuven)
The purpose of this study was to develop and validate a theoretically grounded instrument to measure perceived HRM system strength. Relying on the work of Bowen and Ostroff, we identify different constructs capturing measurable features of a strong HRM system. Next, we develop items to measure these constructs, and use two different samples to validate the instrument. The resulting instrument builds on 11 constructs, organized along 3 different hierarchical levels. It is useful for HR practition...
Published on May 1, 2011in Journal of Leadership & Organizational Studies1.60
Angelo J. Kinicki39
Estimated H-index: 39
(ASU: Arizona State University),
Kathryn J. L. Jacobson5
Estimated H-index: 5
(UNM: University of New Mexico)
+ 1 AuthorsGregory E. Prussia18
Estimated H-index: 18
(SU: Seattle University)
This study uses a control theory to develop a multilevel systems model of leadership. The model outlines the processes that senior leaders can use to influence others across hierarchical levels of management and clarifies the mechanisms that link leadership across levels of management—goal cascading, alignment, and the bypass channel of communication. The authors discuss leadership behaviors needed to effectively influence others across a cybernetic process of leadership. Embedded within the mul...
Published on Mar 1, 2011in Organization Science3.26
Spencer Harrison9
Estimated H-index: 9
(BC: Boston College),
Kevin G. Corley30
Estimated H-index: 30
(ASU: Arizona State University)
In this inductive study, we explore the dynamics between Alpinista (a pseudonym), a company that designs and manufactures rock climbing and skiing gear, and the broader cultures within which the company is embedded. Our data pushed us toward the notion of “culture as toolkit,” a perspective that focuses on culture as a set of means or resources used to solve problems. By applying this perspective, we realized that Alpinista's cultural toolkit and the cultural register of the sports (the sum of t...
Published on Feb 1, 2011in Journal of Organizational Behavior5.00
Florian Kunze12
Estimated H-index: 12
(HSG: University of St. Gallen),
Stephan A. Boehm13
Estimated H-index: 13
(HSG: University of St. Gallen),
Heike Bruch26
Estimated H-index: 26
(HSG: University of St. Gallen)
This paper deals with the emergence of perceived age discrimination climate on the company level and its performance consequences. In this new approach to the field of diversity research, we investigated (a) the effect of organizational-level age diversity on collective perceptions of age discrimination climate that (b) in turn should influence the collective affective commitment of employees, which is (c) an important trigger for overall company performance. In a large-scale study that included...
Yuwen Liu7
Estimated H-index: 7
,
James S. Phillips16
Estimated H-index: 16
(UH: University of Houston)
This paper examines how transformational leadership (TFL) climate influences employees' team identity and their intentions to share knowledge and how team knowledge sharing intention subsequently influences team innovativeness. Data was collected from 301 employees comprising 52 R&D teams. Hypotheses were tested with both hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) and regression analyses. Results indicated that TFL climate was related to employees' intention to share knowledge through team identity. At ...
Published on Jan 1, 2011in Journal of Applied Psychology5.07
Chad A. Hartnell9
Estimated H-index: 9
(ASU: Arizona State University),
Amy Y. Ou8
Estimated H-index: 8
(ASU: Arizona State University),
Angelo J. Kinicki39
Estimated H-index: 39
(ASU: Arizona State University)
We apply Quinn and Rohrbaugh’s (1983) competing values framework (CVF) as an organizing taxonomy to meta-analytically test hypotheses about the relationship between 3 culture types and 3 major indices of organizational effectiveness (employee attitudes, operational performance [i.e., innovation and product and service quality], and financial performance). The paper also tests theoretical suppositions undergirding the CVF by investigating the framework’s nomological validity and proposed internal...
Published on Jan 1, 2011in Journal of Applied Psychology5.07
Elizabeth Wolfe Morrison26
Estimated H-index: 26
(NYU: New York University),
Sara L. Wheeler-Smith3
Estimated H-index: 3
(NYU: New York University),
Dishan Kamdar15
Estimated H-index: 15
(Indian School of Business)
Despite a growing body of research on employee voice-defined as the discretionary communication of ideas, suggestions, or opinions intended to improve organizational or unit functioning-the effects of shared or collective-level cognition have received scant attention. There has also been relatively little research on voice within work groups. Our goal in this study was to address these important gaps by focusing on the effects of group-level beliefs about voice (i.e., group voice climate) on ind...
Published on Jan 1, 2011in Journal of Applied Psychology5.07
J. Craig Wallace20
Estimated H-index: 20
(OSU: Oklahoma State University–Stillwater),
Paul D. Johnson9
Estimated H-index: 9
(WCU: Western Carolina University)
+ 1 AuthorsJeffrey B. Paul5
Estimated H-index: 5
(OSU: Oklahoma State University–Stillwater)
The authors proposed and tested a model in which data were collected from managers (n = 539) at 116 corporate-owned quick service restaurants to assess the structural and psychological empowerment process as moderated by shared-felt accountability on indices of performance from a managerial perspective. The authors found that empowering leadership climate positively relates to psychological empowerment climate. In turn, psychological empowerment climate relates to performance only under conditio...
Published on Dec 1, 2010in Personnel Psychology6.93
Fred Walumwa39
Estimated H-index: 39
(ASU: Arizona State University),
Suzanne J. Peterson25
Estimated H-index: 25
(ASU: Arizona State University)
+ 1 AuthorsChad A. Hartnell9
Estimated H-index: 9
(ASU: Arizona State University)
Using a sample of 79 police leaders and their direct reports (264 police followers), this study investigated the relationships of leader and follower psychological capital, service climate, and job performance. Hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) results revealed that leader psychological capital was positively related to follower performance, with this relationship mediated by follower psychological capital. We also found that the follower psychological capital-performance relationship was moder...
Published on Dec 1, 2010in Systemic Practice and Action Research0.75
Sai Kwan Li1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Grant Jones3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Macquarie University)
As some theorists regard organizational culture as ambiguities, this study attempts to prove that ambiguities are actually the resultant overview of interacting and dissimilar functional subcultures. Therefore, study of the effect of culture on performance should focus on the subculture system instead of the illusive and probably non-existing unitary corporate culture. To this end, a consensual structural framework that effectively demarcates the boundaries of subcultures is needed. By using the...
Cited By8
Newest
Published on Jul 18, 2019in PLOS ONE2.78
Isis H. Settles18
Estimated H-index: 18
(UM: University of Michigan),
Sheila T. Brassel1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UM: University of Michigan)
+ 3 AuthorsKevin C. Elliott16
Estimated H-index: 16
(MSU: Michigan State University)
Scientific research—especially high-impact research—is increasingly being performed in teams that are interdisciplinary and demographically diverse. Nevertheless, very little research has investigated how the climate on these diverse science teams affects data sharing or the experiences of their members. To address these gaps, we conducted a quantitative study of 266 scientists from 105 NSF-funded interdisciplinary environmental science teams. We examined how team climate mediates the associatio...
Published on May 16, 2019
Hy V. Huynh (Duke University)
Evidence shows that orphaned and separated children (OSC) in resource-poor societies are more likely to experience maltreatment in the forms of neglect, discrimination, malnutrition, and emotional, physical, and sexual abuse than their non-orphaned peers. As the number of OSC rapidly increases in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), it is important not to discount high-quality residential care centers (RCCs) as suitable options on the continuum of alternative care for OSC. This statement sh...
Published on Jan 1, 2019
David Starr-Glass4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Empire State College)
Management is not an abstraction; rather, it is an active process conducted within a specific organizational environment. To be successful and effective, managers must appreciate the organizational environment within which they operate and align their efforts with its underlying system of assumptions, beliefs, and values—that is, with its culture. This chapter provides an introduction to the cultural forces at work within work-related environments: national cultures, organizational cultures, and...
C. Robert M. Werner-de-Sondberg (NTU: Nottingham Trent University), M Karanika-Murray10
Estimated H-index: 10
(NTU: Nottingham Trent University)
+ 1 AuthorsN Blagden8
Estimated H-index: 8
(NTU: Nottingham Trent University)
The research explores a new model of staff well-being across UK police custodial services (public and private). These services are unique for the fact that police sergeant custody officers are supported by detention officers who can be publicly or privately contracted, with the latter providing a heterogeneous mix never previously researched. The model informs a survey approach conducted across four English police forces. Drawing on a diverse literature which compares health and criminal justice...
Published on Sep 1, 2017in The Journal of Applied Behavioral Science1.68
Laurence G. Weinzimmer7
Estimated H-index: 7
,
Candace A. Esken2
Estimated H-index: 2
Organizational learning has been shown to affect performance. This study offers a fine-grained view regarding different types of learning opportunities. Specifically, opportunities to learn from mistakes are examined. Using three separate samples, we first establish statistically reliable and unidimensional measures of both organizational learning and mistake tolerance. Second, we empirically demonstrate the mediating role of organizational learning on the mistake tolerance–performance relations...
Published on Aug 1, 2017in Management and labour studies
Nazia Zabin Memon1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Lalatendu Kesari Jena6
Estimated H-index: 6
Gender inequality (GI) at the workplace and the ensuing opportunity loss of economy has long been studied, and results were established in different context. Several empirical research confirmed the impact of non-fulfilment of job characteristics and employee expectations on job satisfaction and motivation levels. However, its debilitating effect on the job satisfaction and job motivation levels of the female employees have not seen any empirical conclusion. The primary purpose of the study is t...
Published on Jan 1, 2016in Organizational Research Methods6.55
Michael J. Zyphur23
Estimated H-index: 23
(University of Melbourne),
Raymond F. Zammuto21
Estimated H-index: 21
(University of Colorado Denver),
Zhen Zhang23
Estimated H-index: 23
(ASU: Arizona State University)
This article addresses (in)congruence across different kinds of organizational respondents or “organizational groups”—such as managers versus non-managers or women versus men—and the effects of congruence on organizational outcomes. We introduce a novel multilevel latent polynomial regression model (MLPM) that treats standings of organizational groups as latent “random intercepts” at the organization level while subjecting these to latent interactions that enable response surface modeling to tes...
Published on Feb 1, 2015in Organizational psychology review4.11
Mo Wang30
Estimated H-index: 30
(UF: University of Florida),
John D. Kammeyer-Mueller25
Estimated H-index: 25
(UMN: University of Minnesota)
+ 1 AuthorsYixuan Li1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UF: University of Florida)
In the current paper, we provide a formal taxonomy of the organizational context relevant to newcomer socialization. We also propose that what newcomers learn during socialization periods (i.e., socialization content) and how they could learn the new information and knowledge (i.e., socialization process) are two distinct but related aspects of newcomer socialization. Based on these conceptual developments, we establish a theoretical model that articulates the mechanisms via which different cont...