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Better safe than sorry: Methods for risk assessment of psychosocial hazards

Published on Apr 1, 2019in Safety Science 3.62
· DOI :10.1016/j.ssci.2019.01.003
Yannick Arnold Metzler1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Duisburg-Essen),
Georg von Groeling-Müller , Silja Bellingrath17
Estimated H-index: 17
(University of Duisburg-Essen)
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Abstract
Abstract Psychosocial risk assessment is becoming increasingly important for research and occupational health and safety due to legislative amendments obliging employers to implement psychosocial work factors into general risk assessment. While various sources provide guidance on hazard identification, statistically assessing the risk probability of psychosocial hazards remains poorly understood. In the current study, we investigate the risk potential of psychosocial hazards using the German Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire, in a cross-sectional sample of 549 blast furnace workers of a German steel company. We examine and compare established methods for risk evaluation in four occupational groups and in total, reflecting the working area, aiming to determine the utility of these methods for risk assessment: (1) An exposure-based approach using the scales’ average scores, (2) comparing the scales’ average scores with a job-exposure matrix using t-tests, (3) regression analyses, and (4) an approach by Clarke and Cooper (2000) referring to a common risk equation. Analyses show similar results of risk evaluation by each method when used within four occupational groups. Therefore, results on the sample level sufficiently represent results on the job level. Substantial differences, however, appear between the methods. Determining the approach of Clarke and Cooper to be most promising, our findings indicate that the choice of risk evaluation method strongly impacts risk management, as the derived risk minimizing measures are conducted only for those hazards evaluated as risks and according to their level of priority. Future research and policy development must focus stronger on how to best achieve psychosocial risk evaluation.
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References104
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Published on Jan 1, 2018in Journal of Occupational Health Psychology 5.13
Juliet Hassard9
Estimated H-index: 9
(Birkbeck, University of London),
Kevin Teoh5
Estimated H-index: 5
(Birkbeck, University of London)
+ 2 AuthorsTom Cox38
Estimated H-index: 38
(Birkbeck, University of London)
Objective. A global and systematic review of the available evidence examining the cost of work-related stress would yield important insights into the magnitude and nature of this social phenomenon. The objective of this systematic review was to collate, extract, review, and synthesize economic evaluations of the cost of work-related stress to society. Method. A research protocol was developed outlining the search strategy. Included cost-ofillness (COI) studies estimated the cost of work-related ...
24 Citations Source Cite
Published on Dec 1, 2017in BMC Psychiatry 2.67
Dirk-Matthias Rose8
Estimated H-index: 8
(University of Mainz),
Andreas Seidler22
Estimated H-index: 22
(TUD: Dresden University of Technology)
+ 11 AuthorsP.S. Wild8
Estimated H-index: 8
(University of Mainz)
Abstract Background While work-related fatigue has become an issue of concern among European employees, the relationship between fatigue, depression and work-related stressors is far from clear. The purposes of this study were (1) to determine the associations of fatigue with work-related stressors, severe medical disease, health behavior and depression in the working population and (2) to determine the unique impact of work-related stressors on fatigue. Methods We used cross-sectional data of N...
9 Citations Source Cite
Published on Nov 1, 2017in Safety Science 3.62
Floris Goerlandt22
Estimated H-index: 22
(Aalto University),
Nima Khakzad19
Estimated H-index: 19
(TU Delft: Delft University of Technology),
Genserik Reniers23
Estimated H-index: 23
(TU Delft: Delft University of Technology)
Quantitative risk analysis (QRA) is widely applied in several industries as a tool to improve safety, as part of design, licensing or operational processes. Nevertheless, there is much less academic research on the validity and validation of QRA, despite their importance both for the science of risk analysis and with respect to its practical implication for decision-making and improving system safety. In light of this, this paper presents a review focusing on the validity and validation of QRA i...
29 Citations Source Cite
Thorsten Lunau17
Estimated H-index: 17
(HHU: University of Düsseldorf),
Nico Dragano45
Estimated H-index: 45
(HHU: University of Düsseldorf)
+ 1 AuthorsMorten Wahrendorf19
Estimated H-index: 19
(HHU: University of Düsseldorf)
Background In times of demographic change, maintaining health and employability of older employees is important. In this context, studies show that stressful working conditions differ by countries. Yet, it is unclear if specific national management practices to deal with these conditions contribute towards explaining country differences.
3 Citations Source Cite
Published on Sep 1, 2017in Accident Analysis & Prevention 3.06
Nini Xia5
Estimated H-index: 5
(College of Management and Economics),
Xueqing Wang4
Estimated H-index: 4
(College of Management and Economics)
+ 2 AuthorsBingsheng Liu2
Estimated H-index: 2
(College of Management and Economics)
Abstract While risk perception is a key factor influencing safety behavior, the academia lacks specific attention to the ways that workers perceive risk, and thus little is known about the mechanisms through which different risk perceptions influence safety behavior. Most previous research in the workplace safety domain argues that people tend to perceive risk based on rational formulations of risk criticality. However, individuals’ emotions can be also useful in understanding their perceptions....
9 Citations Source Cite
Published on Aug 17, 2017in Frontiers in Public Health
Yannick Arnold Metzler1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Duisburg-Essen),
Silja Bellingrath17
Estimated H-index: 17
(University of Duisburg-Essen)
The European steel industry’s workforce is highly heterogeneous and consists of various occupational groups, presumably facing different psychosocial stressors. The few existing studies on the subject mainly focussed on physical constraints of blue-collar workers, whereas the supposable psychosocial workload received only little research attention. This is remarkable considering the challenges associated with statutory required risk assessment of psychosocial hazards. Valid measures of hazard an...
2 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jun 1, 2017in Safety Science 3.62
William D. Taylor5
Estimated H-index: 5
,
Lori Anderson Snyder10
Estimated H-index: 10
(OU: University of Oklahoma)
Abstract Although it may be expected that employee perception of risk impacts engagement in safety behavior, previous research has been equivocal. The purpose of the present study was to clarify this relationship via a more thorough measurement of risk perception. Specifically, this study investigated the value of using a risk perception measure that makes risk perception conditional on behavior, in addition to investigating cognitive and affective risk perception. Another purpose of this study ...
5 Citations Source Cite
Published on May 1, 2017in Safety and health at work
Linn Iren Vestly Bergh4
Estimated H-index: 4
(University of Nottingham),
Stavroula Leka22
Estimated H-index: 22
(University of Nottingham),
G.I.J.M. Zwetsloot19
Estimated H-index: 19
(University of Nottingham)
Abstract Background Psychosocial risk management [Psychosocial Risk Management Approach (PRIMA)] has, through the years, been applied in several organizations in various industries and countries globally. PRIMA principles have also been translated into international frameworks, such as PRIMA-EF (European framework) and the World Health Organization Healthy Workplace Framework. Over the past 10 years, an oil and gas company has put efforts into adopting and implementing international frameworks a...
1 Citations Source Cite
Published on May 1, 2017
D. Taeger1
Estimated H-index: 1
(RUB: Ruhr University Bochum)
Hintergrund Das Erkennen und Quantifizieren von Gesundheitsgefahren ist ein Kernbereich der Arbeitsepidemiologie, um relevante arbeitsbedingte Beschwerden und Erkrankungen zu verhindern und zu kontrollieren. Job-Expositions-Matrizen (JEM) sind ein Standard-Tool, um dies umzusetzen.
1 Citations Source Cite
Published on May 1, 2017
Matthias Nübling15
Estimated H-index: 15
,
M Vomstein2
Estimated H-index: 2
+ 1 AuthorsHj Lincke3
Estimated H-index: 3
Hintergrund Die Beurteilung von Belastungen („exposures“) anhand von Berufen oder Tatigkeiten in einer Job-Expositions-Matrix (JEM) ist in vielen Bereichen der Arbeitsepidemiologie ein bewahrtes Verfahren.
3 Citations Source Cite
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