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Development of peak oxygen uptake from 11–16 years determined using both treadmill and cycle ergometry

Published on Mar 1, 2019in European Journal of Applied Physiology3.055
· DOI :10.1007/s00421-019-04071-3
Neil Armstrong45
Estimated H-index: 45
(University of Exeter),
Jo Welsman9
Estimated H-index: 9
(University of Exeter)
Abstract
Purposes To investigate the development of peak oxygen uptake (\(\dot{{V}}{\text{O}}_{2}\)) assessed on both a treadmill and a cycle ergometer in relation with sex and concurrent changes in age, body mass, fat-free mass (FFM), and maturity status and to evaluate currently proposed ‘clinical red flags’ or health-related cut-points for peak \(\dot{{V}}{\text{O}}_{2}\).
  • References (40)
  • Citations (7)
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References40
Newest
#1Neil Armstrong (University of Exeter)H-Index: 45
#2Jo Welsman (University of Exeter)H-Index: 9
Recent publications in the British Journal of Sports Medicine ( BJSM) (mis)represent and (mis)interpret young people’s cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) and potentially (mis)inform health promotion and clinical practice. 1 2 The papers recognise peak VO2as the criterion measure of CRF but base their estimations of peak VO2 on performances in 20 m shuttle runs (20mSRT). Moreover, and of serious concern to us, estimated peak VO2 is (mis)represented and (mis)interpreted in ratio with body mass (ie, i...
6 CitationsSource
#1Justin J. Lang (Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario)H-Index: 11
#2S TremblayMark (Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario)H-Index: 67
Last. Grant R. TomkinsonH-Index: 25
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Purpose To identify criterion-referenced standards for cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF); to estimate the percentage of children and youth that met each standard; and to discuss strategies to help improve the utility of criterion-referenced standards for population health research. Methods A search of four databases was undertaken to identify papers that reported criterion-referenced CRF standards for children and youth generated using the receiver operating characteristic curve technique. A pseud...
12 CitationsSource
#1Neil Armstrong (University of Exeter)H-Index: 45
#2Jo Welsman (University of Exeter)H-Index: 9
Purpose: To investigate peak oxygen uptake (V˙O2) in relation to sex, age, body mass, fat-free mass (FFM), maturity, and overweight status. Methods: Multiplicative, allometric models of 10- to 18-y...
8 CitationsSource
#1Jo Welsman (University of Exeter)H-Index: 9
#2Neil Armstrong (University of Exeter)H-Index: 45
In this paper, we draw on cross-sectional, treadmill-determined, peak oxygen uptake data, collected in our laboratory over a 20-year period, to examine whether traditional per body mass (ratio) sca...
11 CitationsSource
#1Bareket Falk (Brock University)H-Index: 29
#2Raffy Dotan (Brock University)H-Index: 16
The assessment of maximal aerobic power (V˙O2max) in both children and adults is an invaluable tool for the evaluation of exercise performance capacity and general physical fitness in clinical, ath...
5 CitationsSource
PURPOSE: To investigate, longitudinally, short-term power output in relation to sex and concurrent changes in age, body mass, fat-free mass (FFM), and maturity status. METHODS: Multiplicative multilevel modeling which enables the effects of variables to be partitioned concurrently within an allometric framework was used to analyze the peak power (PP) and mean power (MP) of 388 11- to 18-yr-olds. Multilevel models were founded on 763 (405 from boys; 358 from girls) determinations of PP and MP fro...
3 CitationsSource
#1Eivind AadlandH-Index: 15
#2Sigmund A. Anderssen (Norwegian School of Sport Sciences)H-Index: 52
Last. Jostein Steene-Johannessen (Norwegian School of Sport Sciences)H-Index: 25
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This is the peer reviewed (post-print) version of the following article: Aadland, E., Anderssen, S. A., Andersen, L. B., Resaland, G. K., Kolle, E., & Steene-Johannessen, J. (2019). Aerobic fitness thresholds to define poor cardiometabolic health in children and youth. Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports, 29(2), 240-250, which has been published in final form at https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/sms.13330. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in ac...
3 CitationsSource
#1Andrew O. Agbaje (University of Eastern Finland)H-Index: 1
#2Eero A. Haapala (University of Jyväskylä)H-Index: 11
Last. Timo A. Lakka (University of Eastern Finland)H-Index: 85
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We aimed to develop cut-points for directly measured peak oxygen uptake (VO 2peak) to identify boys and girls at increased cardiometabolic risk using different scaling methods to control for body size and composition. Altogether 352 children (186 boys, 166 girls) aged 9-11 years were included in the analyses. We measured VO 2peak directly during a maximal cycle ergometer exercise test and lean body mass (LM) by bioelectrical impedance. We computed a sex- and age-specific cardiometabolic risk sco...
3 CitationsSource
#1Mette Stavnsbo (Norwegian School of Sport Sciences)H-Index: 1
#2Geir Kåre Resaland (Sciences Po)H-Index: 2
Last. Eivind Aadland (Sciences Po)H-Index: 1
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Abstract Background and aims International reference values for cardiometabolic risk variables, to allow for standardization of continuous risk scores in children, are not currently available. The aim of this study was to provide international age- and gender-specific reference values for cardiometabolic risk factors in children and adolescents. Methods Cohorts of children sampled from different parts of Europe (North, South, Mid and Eastern) and from the United States were pooled. In total, 22,...
5 CitationsSource
#1Neil ArmstrongH-Index: 45
5 Citations
Cited By7
Newest
#1Alan M. Nevill (University of Wolverhampton)H-Index: 57
#2Michael J. Duncan (Coventry University)H-Index: 27
Last. Gavin Sandercock (University of Essex)H-Index: 28
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Previous research into the association between aerobic fitness and physical activity in children is equivocal. However, previous research has always assumed that such an association was linear. Thi...
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#1Neil Armstrong (University of Exeter)H-Index: 45
#2Jo Welsman (University of Exeter)H-Index: 9
To investigate longitudinally (1) the contribution of morphological covariates to explaining the development of maximum cardiac output (${\dot{\text{Q}}} max) and maximum arteriovenous oxygen difference (a-vO2 diff max), (2) sex differences in {\dot{\text{Q}}} max and a-vO2 diff max once age, maturity status, and morphological covariates have been controlled for, and, (3) the contribution of concurrent changes in morphological and cardiovascular covariates to explaining the sex-specific d...
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#1Tonje Reitan Forbregd (University of Bergen)H-Index: 1
#2Michelle Arthy Aloyseus (University of Bergen)H-Index: 1
Last. Gottfried Greve (University of Bergen)H-Index: 12
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1.1 Background/hypothesis Cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) is used in the assessment of function and prognosis of cardiopulmonary health in children with cardiac- and pulmonary diseases. New techniques, such as echocardiography, cardiac MRi, and PET-scan, can be performed simultaneously with exercise testing. Thus, it is desirable to have a broader knowledge about the children’s normal cardiopulmonary function in different body postures and exercise modalities. The aim of the present stud...
1 CitationsSource
#1Neil Armstrong (University of Exeter)H-Index: 45
#2Jo Welsman (University of Exeter)H-Index: 9
Purpose To investigate (1) whether maximal stroke volume (SVmax) occurs at submaximal exercise intensities, (2) sex differences in SVmax once fat-free mass (FFM) has been controlled for, and, (3) the contribution of concurrent changes in FFM and SVmax to the sex-specific development of peak oxygen uptake \( \left( {{\dot{\text{V}}\text{O}}_{2} } \right) \).
2 CitationsSource
#1Neil Armstrong (University of Exeter)H-Index: 45
#2Jo Welsman (University of Exeter)H-Index: 9
: We welcome Raffy Dotan’s Letter to the Editor (14) as it gives us another opportunity to promote evidence-based discussion of the development of youth aerobic fitness. Readers of our contributions to the 2019 Special Issue of Pediatric Exercise Science (6,27,28) will recall that we concluded with, “The authors encourage all pediatric exercise scientists to engage with this discussion, to share ideas and methods, and be willing to explore alternatives. There are many issues to resolve and const...
Source
#1Jo Welsman (University of Exeter)H-Index: 9
#2Neil Armstrong (University of Exeter)H-Index: 45
1 CitationsSource
1 CitationsSource
#1Neil Armstrong (University of Exeter)H-Index: 45
#2Jo Welsman (University of Exeter)H-Index: 9
.Peak oxygen uptake (V O_2) is internationally recognized as the criterion measure of youth aerobic fitness, but flawed laboratory assessments and fallacious interpretations of peak V O_2 in ratio with body mass have confused our understanding of the development of aerobic fitness. Moreover, the recent emergence of specious predictions of peak V O_2 from performance tests and the promotion of spurious ‘clinical red flags’ and cardiometabolic cut-points have confused our understanding of the rela...
2 CitationsSource
#1Jo Welsman (University of Exeter)H-Index: 9
#2Neil Armstrong (University of Exeter)H-Index: 45
Objectives Over 30 years ago we demonstrated the poor criterion validity of a popular fitness test, the 20 m shuttle run or ‘bleep’ test (20mSRT). We discounted the test and assumed that others with demonstrable validity and reliability would replace its use in research. Around then, our attention was drawn to an eloquent but obscure paper by JM Tanner (1949) which detailed the fallacy of simple division by body mass to accommodate body size differences in physiological function. Tanner describe...
2 CitationsSource
#1Neil Armstrong (University of Exeter)H-Index: 45
#2Jo Welsman (University of Exeter)H-Index: 9
Last. Saul R. BloxhamH-Index: 2
view all 3 authors...
Purpose To investigate the development of peak power output (PP) and mean power output (MP) during two different modes of exercise in relation to sex and concurrent changes in age, body mass, fat-free mass (FFM), maturity status and, in the case of MP, peak oxygen uptake (\( \dot{V}{\text{O}}_{2} \)).
1 CitationsSource