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Effects of Media Exposure to Conflicting Information About Mammography: Results From a Population-based Survey Experiment

Published on Aug 29, 2019in Annals of Behavioral Medicine3.575
路 DOI :10.1093/abm/kay098
Rebekah H. Nagler15
Estimated H-index: 15
(UMN: University of Minnesota),
Marco Yzer22
Estimated H-index: 22
(UMN: University of Minnesota),
Alexander J. Rothman43
Estimated H-index: 43
(UMN: University of Minnesota)
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Abstract
  • References (59)
  • Citations (3)
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References59
Newest
#1Rebekah H. Nagler (UMN: University of Minnesota)H-Index: 15
#2Erika Franklin Fowler (Wesleyan University)H-Index: 14
Last. Sarah E. Gollust (UMN: University of Minnesota)H-Index: 31
view all 5 authors...
Abstract Background There is longstanding expert disagreement about the age at and frequency with which women should be screened for breast cancer. These debates are reflected in the conflicting recommendations about mammography issued by major professional organizations, such as the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force and the American Cancer Society. Previous research has shown that these recommendations garner substantial media attention鈥攁nd therefore might affect women's screening perceptions...
2 CitationsSource
#1Yotam Ophir (UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)H-Index: 3
#2Kathleen Hall Jamieson (Annenberg Public Policy Center)H-Index: 31
3 CitationsSource
#1Chul-joo Lee (SNU: Seoul National University)H-Index: 17
#2Rebekah H. NaglerH-Index: 15
Last. Ningxin Wang (UIUC: University of Illinois at Urbana鈥揅hampaign)H-Index: 1
view all 3 authors...
ABSTRACTCommunication scholars have raised concerns that the media present contradictory or conflicting information on health, science, and political issues, speculating that such information may have adverse effects on public cognitions, affect, and behaviors. However, the evidence base for the effects of contradictory messages remains thin. Using nutrition as a case example, this study builds upon this nascent literature by employing a three-wave panel dataset from a survey with a nationally r...
9 CitationsSource
5 CitationsSource
#1Leng Leng Young Lin (NYU: New York University)H-Index: 1
#2Andrew B. Rosenkrantz (NYU: New York University)H-Index: 39
Rationale and Objectives To characterize online news coverage relating to mammography, including articles' stance toward screening mammography. Materials and Methods Google News was used to search U.S. news sites over a 9-year period (2006鈥2015) based on the search terms 鈥渕ammography鈥 and 鈥渕ammogram.鈥 The top 100 search results were recorded. Identified articles were manually reviewed. Results The top 100 news articles were from the following sources: local news outlet (50%), national news outle...
4 CitationsSource
#1Andy S.L. Tan (Harvard University)H-Index: 15
#2Chul-joo Lee (SNU: Seoul National University)H-Index: 17
Last. Cabral A. Bigman (UIUC: University of Illinois at Urbana鈥揅hampaign)H-Index: 10
view all 4 authors...
Abstract News coverage of novel tobacco products including e-cigarettes has framed the use of these products with both positive and negative slants. Conflicting information may shape public knowledge, perceptions of e-cigarettes, and their harms. The objective of this study is to assess effects of exposure to conflicting news coverage on US adults' beliefs about harms and benefits of e-cigarette use. We conducted a one-way between-subjects randomized controlled experiment in 2016 to compare the ...
8 CitationsSource
#1Rebekah H. NaglerH-Index: 15
#2Erika Franklin Fowler (Wesleyan University)H-Index: 4
Last. Sarah E. GollustH-Index: 31
view all 3 authors...
Background:Scientists, clinicians, and other experts aim to maximize the benefits of cancer screening while minimizing its harms. Chief among these harms are overdiagnosis and overtreatment. Although available data suggest that patient awareness of these harms is low, we know little about how patien
13 CitationsSource
#1Jiani Yu (UMN: University of Minnesota)H-Index: 1
#2Rebekah H. Nagler (UMN: University of Minnesota)H-Index: 15
Last. Sarah E. Gollust (UMN: University of Minnesota)H-Index: 31
view all 5 authors...
12 CitationsSource
#1Rebekah H. Nagler (UMN: University of Minnesota)H-Index: 15
#2Jennifer A. Lueck (A&M: Texas A&M University)H-Index: 3
Last. Lauren S. Gray (UMN: University of Minnesota)H-Index: 1
view all 3 authors...
Background There is substantial expert disagreement about the use of mammography to screen for breast cancer, and this disagreement routinely plays out in the media. Evidence suggests that some women are aware of the controversy over mammography, but less is known about whether immigrant and other underserved women have heard about it and, if so, how they react to it. Objective To explore immigrant women's awareness of and reactions to mammography controversy. Design Community-engaged qualitativ...
5 CitationsSource
#1Daniel J. Hopkins (UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)H-Index: 19
#2Jonathan Mummolo (Stanford University)H-Index: 7
Issue frames are a central concept in studying public opinion, and are thought to operate by foregrounding related considerations in citizens' minds. But scholarship has yet to consider the breadth of framing effects by testing whether frames influence attitudes beyond the specific issue they highlight. For example, does a discussion of terrorism affect opinions on proximate issues like crime or even more remote issues like poverty? By measuring the breadth of framing effects, we can assess the ...
5 CitationsSource
Cited By3
Newest
#1Benjamin A. Lyons (UofU: University of Utah)
#2Vittorio Merola (SBU: Stony Brook University)
Last. Jason Reifler (University of Exeter)H-Index: 18
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Abstract Rationale Experts have recently argued that guidelines to take the full course of antibiotics are due for revision, instead recommending that patients stop when they feel better. It is unknown how communicating revised guidelines from medical experts about how long to take a course of antibiotics will affect beliefs, behavior, and trust in guidelines more generally. Objective. This study seeks to understand how revisions to long standing advice impacts the beliefs, behavior, and trust t...
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#1Xizhu Xiao (WSU: Washington State University)
#2Yan Su (WSU: Washington State University)
Approximately 562 million women in China are at risk for cervical cancer, which is mainly triggered by persistent infections with human papillomavirus (HPV). HPV is also responsible for the majorit...
Source
#1Weijia Shi (UMN: University of Minnesota)
#2Rebekah H. Nagler (UMN: University of Minnesota)H-Index: 15
Last. Sarah E. Gollust (UMN: University of Minnesota)H-Index: 31
view all 4 authors...
ABSTRACTIn recent years, there has been a shift toward promoting informed decision making for mammography screening for average-risk women in their 40s. Professional organizations such as the Ameri...
Source
#1Yue Guan (Emory University)
#2Eric J. Nehl (Emory University)H-Index: 21
Last. Colleen M. McBride (Emory University)H-Index: 53
view all 7 authors...
This study aimed to assess women鈥檚 willingness to alter mammogram frequency based on their low risk for HBOC, and to examine if cognitive and emotional factors are associated with women鈥檚 inclination to decrease mammogram frequency. We conducted an online survey with women (N鈥=鈥124) who were unlikely to have a BRCA mutation and at average population risk for breast cancer based on family history. Most women were either white (50%) or African American (38%) and were 50 years or older (74%). One-t...
Source
#1Xuanzi Qin (UMN: University of Minnesota)H-Index: 1
#2Rebekah H. Nagler (UMN: University of Minnesota)H-Index: 15
Last. Sarah E. Gollust (UMN: University of Minnesota)H-Index: 31
view all 4 authors...
Abstract The American Cancer Society and the U.S. Preventive Task Force recently recommended that women initiate routine breast cancer screening at older ages (45 and 50, respectively) than previously recommended, and both organizations emphasize the importance of weighing the harms of mammograms against the benefits in making informed decisions. However, little is known from national samples about how women perceive the harms and benefits of mammograms, and how these perceptions relate to their...
Source
Objective: To test the effect of news media exposure to contradictory information about carbohydrates and dietary fats on levels of confusion, nutritional backlash and dietary intentions. Design: We conducted an online survey experiment between 11 and 28 February 2018, randomizing participants to one of six experimental conditions. Two 鈥榗ontradictory information鈥 conditions asked participants to read one news article on the risks of a low-carbohydrate diet and one article on the risks of a low-f...
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