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Fundamental roles of axial stretch in isometric and isobaric evaluations of vascular contractility

Published on Jan 25, 2019in Journal of Biomechanical Engineering-transactions of The Asme2.02
· DOI :10.1115/1.4042171
Alexander W. Caulk6
Estimated H-index: 6
(Yale University),
D HumphreyJay56
Estimated H-index: 56
(Yale University)
+ 0 AuthorsS.-I. Murtada1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Yale University)
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  • References (38)
  • Citations (2)
Cite
References38
Newest
Published on Nov 1, 2017in Journal of the Royal Society Interface3.22
Matthew R. Bersi11
Estimated H-index: 11
(Yale University),
Ramak Khosravi5
Estimated H-index: 5
(Yale University)
+ 2 AuthorsD HumphreyJay56
Estimated H-index: 56
(Yale University)
The embryonic lineage of intramural cells, microstructural organization of the extracellular matrix, local luminal and wall geometry, and haemodynamic loads vary along the length of the aorta. Yet, it remains unclear why certain diseases manifest differentially along the aorta. Toward this end, myriad animal models provide insight into diverse disease conditions—including fibrosis, aneurysm and dissection—but inherent differences across models impede general interpretations. We examined region-s...
Published on Aug 1, 2017in Biophysical Journal3.67
Sae-II Murtada1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Graz University of Technology),
D HumphreyJay56
Estimated H-index: 56
(Yale University),
Gerhard A. Holzapfel62
Estimated H-index: 62
(Graz University of Technology)
Abstract Mathematical models can facilitate an integrative understanding of the complexity underlying biological structure and function, but they must be informed and validated by empirical data. Uniaxial contraction of an arterial ring is a well-used in vitro approach for studying characteristics of smooth muscle contractility even though this experimental arrangement does not mimic the in vivo vascular geometry or loading. In contrast, biaxial contraction of an inflated and axially extended ex...
Published on Jun 1, 2016in Biomechanics and Modeling in Mechanobiology2.83
S.-I. Murtada1
Estimated H-index: 1
(KI: Karolinska Institutet),
Susanne Lewin1
Estimated H-index: 1
(KTH: Royal Institute of Technology)
+ 1 AuthorsD HumphreyJay56
Estimated H-index: 56
(Yale University)
Arteries can adapt to sustained changes in blood pressure and flow, and it is thought that these adaptive processes often begin with an altered smooth muscle cell activity that precedes any detectable changes in the passive wall components. Yet, due to the intrinsic coupling between the active and passive properties of the arterial wall, it has been difficult to delineate the adaptive contributions of active smooth muscle. To address this need, we used a novel experimental–computational approach...
Published on May 1, 2016in Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology6.62
J. Ferruzzi10
Estimated H-index: 10
,
Sae-Il Murtada5
Estimated H-index: 5
+ 5 AuthorsD HumphreyJay56
Estimated H-index: 56
Objective—Transforming growth factor-beta is a pleiotropic cytokine having diverse roles in vascular morphogenesis, homeostasis, and pathogenesis. Altered activity of and signaling through transforming growth factor-beta has been implicated in thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections, conditions characterized by a reduced structural integrity of the wall that associates with altered biomechanics and mechanobiology. We quantify and contrast the passive and active biaxial biomechanical properties...
S.-I. Murtada1
Estimated H-index: 1
(KI: Karolinska Institutet),
J. Ferruzzi10
Estimated H-index: 10
(Yale University)
+ 1 AuthorsJay D. Humphrey5
Estimated H-index: 5
(Yale University)
The precise role of smooth muscle cell contractility in elastic arteries remains unclear, but accumulating evidence suggests that smooth muscle dysfunction plays an important role in the development of thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections (TAADs). Given the increasing availability of mouse models of these conditions, there is a special opportunity to study roles of contractility ex vivo in intact vessels subjected to different mechanical loads. In parallel, of course, there is a similar nee...
Published on Apr 1, 2016in Pharmacological Reviews18.89
Frank V. Brozovich5
Estimated H-index: 5
,
Christopher Nicholson3
Estimated H-index: 3
(BU: Boston University)
+ 3 AuthorsKathleen G. Morgan51
Estimated H-index: 51
(BU: Boston University)
The smooth muscle cell directly drives the contraction of the vascular wall and hence regulates the size of the blood vessel lumen. We review here the current understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which agonists, therapeutics, and diseases regulate contractility of the vascular smooth muscle cell and we place this within the context of whole body function. We also discuss the implications for personalized medicine and highlight specific potential target molecules that may provide opportun...
Published on Feb 1, 2016in Microscopy and Microanalysis2.67
Shana R. Watson2
Estimated H-index: 2
(USC: University of South Carolina),
Piaomu Liu2
Estimated H-index: 2
(USC: University of South Carolina)
+ 3 AuthorsSusan M. Lessner17
Estimated H-index: 17
(USC: University of South Carolina)
Characterization of collagen fiber angle distribution throughout the blood vessel wall provides insight into the mechanical behavior of healthy and diseased arteries and their capacity to remodel. Atherosclerotic plaque contributes to the overall mechanical behavior, yet little is known experimentally about how collagen fiber orientation is influenced by atherogenesis. We hypothesized that atherosclerotic lesion development, and the factors contributing to lesion development, leads to a shift in...
Published on Dec 15, 2015in Frontiers in Physiology3.20
Arthur J. A. Leloup5
Estimated H-index: 5
(University of Antwerp),
Cor E. Van Hove16
Estimated H-index: 16
(University of Antwerp)
+ 3 AuthorsPaul Fransen18
Estimated H-index: 18
(University of Antwerp)
In the last decades, the search for mechanisms underlying progressive arterial stiffening and for interventions to avoid or reverse this process has gained much attention. In general, arterial stiffening displays regional variation and is, for example, during aging more prominent in elastic than in muscular arteries. We hypothesize that besides passive also active regulators of arterial compliance (i.e. endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) function) differ between these arteries. H...
Published on Apr 10, 2015in Circulation Research15.86
D HumphreyJay56
Estimated H-index: 56
(Yale University),
Martin A. Schwartz91
Estimated H-index: 91
+ 1 AuthorsDianna M. Milewicz56
Estimated H-index: 56
Thoracic aortic diseases that involve progressive enlargement, acute dissection, or rupture are influenced by the hemodynamic loads and mechanical properties of the wall. We have only limited understanding, however, of the mechanobiological processes that lead to these potentially lethal conditions. Homeostasis requires that intramural cells sense their local chemomechanical environment and establish, maintain, remodel, or repair the extracellular matrix to provide suitable compliance and yet su...
J. Ferruzzi10
Estimated H-index: 10
(Yale University),
Matthew R. Bersi11
Estimated H-index: 11
(Yale University)
+ 2 AuthorsD HumphreyJay56
Estimated H-index: 56
(Yale University)
Central artery stiffness has emerged over the past 15 years as a clinically significant indicator of cardiovascular function and initiator of disease. Loss of elastic fiber integrity is one of the primary contributors to increased arterial stiffening in aging, hypertension, and related conditions. Elastic fibers consist of an elastin core and multiple glycoproteins; hence defects in any of these constituents can adversely affect arterial wall mechanics. In this paper, we focus on mechanical cons...
Cited By2
Newest
Bart Spronck7
Estimated H-index: 7
(Yale University),
Bart Spronck1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Yale University),
D HumphreyJay56
Estimated H-index: 56
(Yale University)
Arina Korneva1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Yale University),
D HumphreyJay56
Estimated H-index: 56
(Yale University)
There are three primary findings. Marked mouse-to-mouse differences exist in large vessel hypertensive remodeling in an otherwise equivalent cohort of animals. The degree of maladaptation correlate...
Published on Feb 1, 2019in Journal of Biomechanics2.58
Abhay B. Ramachandra4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Yale University),
Abhay B. Ramachandra (Yale University), D HumphreyJay56
Estimated H-index: 56
(Yale University)
Abstract The biomechanical properties of the major pulmonary arteries play critical roles in normal physiology as well as in diverse pathophysiologies and clinical interventions. Importantly, advances in medical imaging enable simulations of pulmonary hemodynamics, but such models cannot reach their full potential until they are informed with region-specific material properties. In this paper, we present passive and active biaxial biomechanical data for the right and left main pulmonary arteries...
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