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An Update on the Role of Cardiorespiratory Fitness, Structured Exercise and Lifestyle Physical Activity in Preventing Cardiovascular Disease and Health Risk

Published on Nov 1, 2018in Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases 6.16
· DOI :10.1016/j.pcad.2018.11.005
Cemal Ozemek6
Estimated H-index: 6
(UIC: University of Illinois at Chicago),
Deepika Laddu6
Estimated H-index: 6
(UIC: University of Illinois at Chicago)
+ 6 AuthorsSteven N. Blair140
Estimated H-index: 140
(USC: University of South Carolina)
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Abstract
Abstract The cardiovascular disease (CVD) pandemic has placed considerable strain on healthcare systems, quality of life, and physical function, while remaining the leading cause of death globally. Decades of scientific investigations have fortified the protective effects of cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF), exercise training, and physical activity (PA) against the development of CVD. This review will summarize recent efforts that have made significant strides in; 1) the application of novel analytic techniques to increase the predictive utility of CRF; 2) understanding the protective effects of long-term compliance to PA recommendations through large cohort studies with multiple points of assessment; 3) and understanding the potential harms associated with extreme volumes of PA.
  • References (104)
  • Citations (11)
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References104
Newest
Published on Mar 1, 2019in Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases 6.16
Sophie K. Kieffer2
Estimated H-index: 2
(NTNU: Norwegian University of Science and Technology),
Ilaria Croci5
Estimated H-index: 5
(UQ: University of Queensland)
+ 1 AuthorsJavaid Nauman17
Estimated H-index: 17
(United Arab Emirates University)
Background: Personal Activity Intelligence (PAI) is a novel activity metric that translates heart rate variations during exercise into a weekly score. Weekly PAI scores assessed at a single point in time were found to associate with lower risk of premature cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality in the general healthy population. However, to date, the associations between long-term longitudinal changes in weekly PAI scores and mortality have not been explored. Purpose: The aim of the present stud...
Published on Nov 20, 2018in JAMA 51.27
Katrina L. Piercy3
Estimated H-index: 3
(HHS: United States Department of Health and Human Services),
Richard P. Troiano1
Estimated H-index: 1
(HHS: United States Department of Health and Human Services)
+ 5 AuthorsRichard Olson2
Estimated H-index: 2
(HHS: United States Department of Health and Human Services)
Importance Approximately 80% of US adults and adolescents are insufficiently active. Physical activity fosters normal growth and development and can make people feel, function, and sleep better and reduce risk of many chronic diseases. Objective To summarize key guidelines in the Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans , 2nd edition (PAG). Process and Evidence Synthesis The 2018 Physical Activity Guidelines Advisory Committee conducted a systematic review of the science supporting physical ac...
Published on Nov 1, 2018in Current Problems in Cardiology 3.33
Cemal Ozemek6
Estimated H-index: 6
,
Shane A. Phillips20
Estimated H-index: 20
(American Physical Therapy Association)
+ 6 AuthorsRoss A. Arena6
Estimated H-index: 6
(American Physical Therapy Association)
Abstract Numerous investigations have established the strong clinical utility of cardiac rehabilitation, while clinical guidelines continually call for a high level of referral and participation. Historically, medical facilities have faced challenges referring eligible patients to cardiac rehabilitation, enrolling only a small portion of those receiving referral. Consequently, less than ~10% of qualifying patients receive any amount of cardiac rehabilitation. This sobering figure has prompted ma...
Published on Oct 1, 2018in European Journal of Epidemiology 6.53
Youngwon Kim14
Estimated H-index: 14
(University of Cambridge),
Tom White9
Estimated H-index: 9
(University of Cambridge)
+ 5 AuthorsSoren Brage64
Estimated H-index: 64
(University of Cambridge)
Little is known about the combined associations of cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) and hand grip strength (GS) with mortality in general adult populations. The purpose of this study was to compare the relative risk of mortality for CRF, GS, and their combination. In UK Biobank, a prospective cohort of > 0.5 million adults aged 40–69 years, CRF was measured through submaximal bike tests; GS was measured using a hand-dynamometer. This analysis is based on data from 70,913 men and women (832 all-ca...
Thijs M.H. Eijsvogels18
Estimated H-index: 18
(Radboud University Nijmegen),
Paul D. Thompson83
Estimated H-index: 83
(Hartford Hospital)
+ 0 AuthorsBarry A. Franklin (Beaumont Hospital)
Purpose of review The “Extreme Exercise Hypothesis” is characterized by a U-shaped or reverse J-shaped, dose-response curve between physical activity volumes and cardiovascular health outcomes. In this review, we summarize recent findings that may support or refute the “Extreme Exercise Hypothesis.” Furthermore, we discuss potential cardiovascular health implications of the cardiac anatomical, structural, contractility, and biomarker abnormalities that have been reported in some veteran enduranc...
Published on Sep 10, 2018in World journal of transplantation
K. Rolid4
Estimated H-index: 4
,
Arne K. Andreassen32
Estimated H-index: 32
+ 7 AuthorsKari Nytrøen8
Estimated H-index: 8
Published on Sep 1, 2018
Sophie K. Kieffer2
Estimated H-index: 2
(NTNU: Norwegian University of Science and Technology),
Nina Zisko5
Estimated H-index: 5
(NTNU: Norwegian University of Science and Technology)
+ 2 AuthorsUlrik Wisløff67
Estimated H-index: 67
(UQ: University of Queensland)
Abstract Objective To test whether Personal Activity Intelligence (PAI), a personalized metric of physical activity (PA) tracking, is associated with all-cause and cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality in patients with self-reported CVD and to determine whether these associations change depending on whether contemporary PA recommendations are met. Patients and Methods A total of 3133 patients with CVD (mean [SD] age, 67.6 [10.3] years; 64% men) were followed from the date of participation in th...
Published on Aug 1, 2018
Gary O'Donovan13
Estimated H-index: 13
(Lboro: Loughborough University),
Emmanuel Stamatakis62
Estimated H-index: 62
(UCL: University College London)
+ 1 AuthorsMark Hamer68
Estimated H-index: 68
(UCL: University College London)
Abstract Objective To investigate the role of vigorous-intensity leisure-time physical activity in reducing cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality risk in the obese. Participants and Methods Trained interviewers assessed physical activity and body mass index (BMI; calculated as the weight in kilograms divided by the height in meters squared) in 59,005 adult participants (mean ± SD age, 57±12 years; 46.5% male) in 2 household-based surveillance studies: Health Survey for England and Scottish Heal...
Published on Jul 1, 2018in Cold Spring Harbor Perspectives in Medicine 5.56
Gregory N. Ruegsegger8
Estimated H-index: 8
(MU: University of Missouri),
Frank W. Booth58
Estimated H-index: 58
Published on Mar 16, 2018in Circulation Research 15.86
Ross Arena52
Estimated H-index: 52
(American Physical Therapy Association),
Cemal Ozemek6
Estimated H-index: 6
(UIC: University of Illinois at Chicago)
+ 1 AuthorsJonathan Myers74
Estimated H-index: 74
(Stanford University)
The value of ascertaining an individual’s cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) is clear; a convincing body of evidence spanning several decades supports the importance of determining CRF in apparently healthy individuals, as well as those at risk for or diagnosed with ≥1 chronic diseases. In fact, CRF is now viewed as a vital sign, recognized as one of the most powerful prognostic markers for mortality and providing a window into one’s future health trajectory.1 CRF has traditionally been considered ...
Cited By11
Newest
Published on Apr 5, 2019in Current Medical Research and Opinion 2.35
Zhenhua Xing1
Estimated H-index: 1
(CSU: Central South University),
Junyu Pei1
Estimated H-index: 1
(CSU: Central South University)
+ 2 AuthorsShan Gao (CSU: Central South University)
Urho M. Kujala62
Estimated H-index: 62
(University of Jyväskylä),
Jani P. Vaara5
Estimated H-index: 5
(National Defence University, Pakistan)
+ -3 AuthorsHeikki Kyröläinen40
Estimated H-index: 40
(University of Jyväskylä)
Importance High physical fitness is associated with a reduction in risk of cardiovascular diseases and death, but the underlying mechanisms are insufficiently understood. Objective To determine how aerobic fitness and muscular strength are associated with serum metabolome measures. Design, Setting, and Participants This cross-sectional study included Finnish men receiving military refresher training from May 5, 2015, to November 28, 2015, representing partly overlapping groups of individuals wit...
Jari A. Laukkanen34
Estimated H-index: 34
(University of Jyväskylä),
Timo A. Lakka78
Estimated H-index: 78
(University of Eastern Finland)
+ -3 AuthorsSetor K. Kunutsor26
Estimated H-index: 26
(UoB: University of Bristol)
Published in Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases 6.16
Salvatore Carbone14
Estimated H-index: 14
(VCU: Virginia Commonwealth University),
Marco Giuseppe Del Buono (UCSC: Catholic University of the Sacred Heart)+ -3 AuthorsCarl J. Lavie82
Estimated H-index: 82
(UQ: University of Queensland)
Abstract The epidemic of obesity contributes to the burden of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in the United States and worldwide. Importantly, obesity is not only preventable but can be treated, particularly with lifestyle modifications to forestall T2DM in those with excess adiposity. The mechanisms linking obesity to T2DM are numerous and involve adipose tissue remodeling as a result of unhealthy behaviors, including unhealthy diet, reduced physical activity (PA) and exercise training (ET), an...
Published on Jul 25, 2019in European Journal of Preventive Cardiology 5.64
Pietro L Laforgia , Francesco Bandera14
Estimated H-index: 14
+ 1 AuthorsMaurizio D. Guazzi67
Estimated H-index: 67
BackgroundChronotropic insufficiency (CI) is defined as the inability of the heart to increase its rate commensurate with increased demand. Exercise CI is an established predictor of major adverse ...
Published on Jul 1, 2019in Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases 6.16
Carl J. Lavie82
Estimated H-index: 82
(UQ: University of Queensland)
Published on Jun 1, 2019in Canadian Journal of Cardiology 5.59
Carl J. Lavie82
Estimated H-index: 82
(UQ: University of Queensland),
Cemal Ozemek6
Estimated H-index: 6
(UIC: University of Illinois at Chicago)
+ 1 AuthorsSergey Kachur12
Estimated H-index: 12
(UQ: University of Queensland)
Published on May 1, 2019in American Journal of Cardiology 2.84
Seamus P. Whelton17
Estimated H-index: 17
(Johns Hopkins University),
Zeina Dardari12
Estimated H-index: 12
(Johns Hopkins University)
+ 6 AuthorsMichael J. Blaha50
Estimated H-index: 50
(Johns Hopkins University)
Isolated low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) is associated with lower fitness and increased mortality. Whether the association between isolated low HDL-C and mortality differs by fitness is uncertain. Patients in the Henry Ford ExercIse Testing Project (FIT Project) completed a physician-referred treadmill stress test and those prescribed lipid-lowering medications or with known cardiovascular disease were excluded. Isolated low HDL-C was defined as HDL-C