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A soil-carrying lacewing larva in Early Cretaceous Lebanese amber

Published on Dec 1, 2018in Scientific Reports 4.01
· DOI :10.1038/s41598-018-34870-1
Ricardo Pérez-de la Fuente10
Estimated H-index: 10
(University of Oxford),
Enrique Peñalver17
Estimated H-index: 17
(Instituto Geológico y Minero de España)
+ 1 AuthorsMichael S. Engel36
Estimated H-index: 36
(AMNH: American Museum of Natural History)
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Abstract
Diverse organisms protect and camouflage themselves using varied materials from their environment. This adaptation and associated behaviours (debris-carrying) are well known in modern green lacewing larvae (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae), mostly due to the widespread use of these immature insects in pest control. However, the evolutionary history of this successful strategy and related morphological adaptations in the lineage are still far from being understood. Here we describe a novel green lacewing larva, Tyruschrysa melqart gen. et sp. nov., from Early Cretaceous Lebanese amber, carrying a preserved debris packet composed by soil particles entangled among specialised setae of extremely elongate tubular tubercles. The new morphotype has features related to the debris-carrying habit that are unknown from extant or extinct green lacewings, namely a high number of tubular tubercle pairs on the abdomen and tubular tubercle setae with mushroom-shaped endings that acted as anchoring points for debris. The current finding expands the diversity of exogenous materials used by green lacewing larvae in deep time, and represents the earliest direct evidence of debris-carrying in the lineage described to date. The debris-carrying larval habit likely played a significant role during the initial phases of diversification of green lacewings.
  • References (46)
  • Citations (1)
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References46
Newest
Published on Dec 1, 2018in Nature Communications 11.88
Davide Badano2
Estimated H-index: 2
(UniGe: University of Genoa),
Michael S. Engel36
Estimated H-index: 36
(KU: University of Kansas)
+ 2 AuthorsPierfilippo Cerretti13
Estimated H-index: 13
Myrmeleontiformia are an ancient group of lacewing insects characterized by predatory larvae with unusual morphologies and behaviours. Mostly soil dwellers with a soft cuticle, their larvae fossilize only as amber inclusions, and thus their fossil record is remarkably sparse. Here, we document a disparate assemblage of myrmeleontiform larvae from the mid-Cretaceous amber (99 Ma) of Myanmar, evidence of a considerable diversification. Our cladistic analysis integrating extant and extinct taxa res...
Published on May 1, 2018in Current Biology 9.19
Xingyue Liu13
Estimated H-index: 13
(CAU: China Agricultural University),
Gongle Shi14
Estimated H-index: 14
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
+ 3 AuthorsMichael S. Engel36
Estimated H-index: 36
(KU: University of Kansas)
Summary Camouflage and mimicry are staples among predator-prey interactions, and evolutionary novelties in behavior, anatomy, and physiology that permit such mimesis are rife throughout the biological world [1, 2]. These specializations allow for prey to better evade capture or permit predators to more easily approach their prey, or in some cases, the mimesis can serve both purposes. Despite the importance of mimesis and camouflage in predator-avoidance or hunting strategies, the long-term histo...
Published on Jan 7, 2018in Annual Review of Entomology 11.80
Michael S. Engel36
Estimated H-index: 36
,
Shaun L. Winterton20
Estimated H-index: 20
,
Laura C.V. Breitkreuz7
Estimated H-index: 7
The last 25 years of phylogenetic investigation into the three orders constituting the superorder Neuropterida—Raphidioptera, Megaloptera, and Neuroptera—have brought about a dramatic revision in our understanding of the evolution of lacewings, snakeflies, dobsonflies, and their diverse relatives. Phylogenetic estimations based on combined analyses of diverse data sources, ranging from adult and larval morphology to full mitochondrial genomic DNA, have begun to converge on similar patterns, many...
Published on Jun 1, 2017in Palaeoworld 1.14
Sibelle Maksoud6
Estimated H-index: 6
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences),
Dany Azar6
Estimated H-index: 6
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
+ 1 AuthorsRaymond Gèze7
Estimated H-index: 7
(Lebanese University)
Abstract The “Gres du Liban” [Sandstone of Lebanon] is the basal lithostratigraphic unit for the Cretaceous series in Lebanon. In the upper part of these siliciclastic-dominated strata we identified three discrete intervals characterized by their richness in amber with biological inclusions, mostly insects. The middle and upper intervals previously attributed to an Early Aptian (= Bedoulian) age are nowadays ascribed to the Early and Late Barremian respectively; the lower interval is Early Barre...
Published on Jan 1, 2017in Systematic Entomology 3.73
Davide Badano2
Estimated H-index: 2
,
Ulrike Aspöck16
Estimated H-index: 16
(University of Vienna)
+ 1 AuthorsPierfilippo Cerretti13
Estimated H-index: 13
Published on Jun 1, 2016in Current Biology 9.19
Xingyue Liu13
Estimated H-index: 13
(CAU: China Agricultural University),
Weiwei Zhang3
Estimated H-index: 3
+ 2 AuthorsMichael S. Engel36
Estimated H-index: 36
(KU: University of Kansas)
Summary Insects exhibit a wide diversity of anatomical specializations in their adult and immature stages associated with particular aspects of their biology. The order Neuroptera (lacewings, antlions, and their relatives) are a moderately diverse lineage of principally predatory animals, at least in their immature stages, as all have a modified piercing-sucking mandible-maxillary complex that allows them to drain fluids from their prey. As such, the larvae of various groups have evolved unique ...
Published on Jun 1, 2016in Science Advances
Bo Wang17
Estimated H-index: 17
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences),
Fangyuan Xia5
Estimated H-index: 5
+ 7 AuthorsJes Rust16
Estimated H-index: 16
(University of Bonn)
Insects have evolved diverse methods of camouflage that have played an important role in their evolutionary success. Debris-carrying, a behavior of actively harvesting and carrying exogenous materials, is among the most fascinating and complex behaviors because it requires not only an ability to recognize, collect, and carry materials but also evolutionary adaptations in related morphological characteristics. However, the fossil record of such behavior is extremely scarce, and only a single Meso...
Published on Mar 1, 2016in Arthropod Structure & Development 1.84
Ricardo Pérez-de la Fuente10
Estimated H-index: 10
(Harvard University),
Xavier Delclòs18
Estimated H-index: 18
(University of Barcelona)
+ 1 AuthorsMichael S. Engel36
Estimated H-index: 36
(KU: University of Kansas)
Abstract Amber holds special paleobiological significance due to its ability to preserve direct evidence of biotic interactions and animal behaviors for millions of years. Here we review the finding of Hallucinochrysa diogenesi Perez-de la Fuente, Delclos, Penalver and Engel, 2012, a morphologically atypical larva related to modern green lacewings (Insecta: Neuroptera) that was described in Early Cretaceous amber from the El Soplao outcrop (northern Spain). The fossil larva is preserved with a d...
Published on Jan 1, 2016
Jonas O. Wolff11
Estimated H-index: 11
(CAU: University of Kiel),
Solimary García-Hernández2
Estimated H-index: 2
(USP: University of São Paulo),
Stanislav N. Gorb61
Estimated H-index: 61
(CAU: University of Kiel)
Opiliones, colloquially also known as harvestmen or daddy longlegs, are arachnids capable of producing and releasing a variety of secretions that are used to deter predators. The fact that a large fraction of these animals also produce efficient glues for trapping prey, gluing eggs to substrates, attaching soil particles to their body or eggs for camouflage purposes, or transferring sperm, is rather unknown. Not only the physical properties of these glues are interesting, but also the supplement...
Published on Jun 1, 2015in Biology Letters 3.32
Graeme D. Ruxton54
Estimated H-index: 54
(St And: University of St Andrews),
Martin Stevens38
Estimated H-index: 38
(University of Exeter)
Many animals decorate themselves through the accumulation of environmental material on their exterior. Decoration has been studied across a range of different taxa, but there are substantial limits to current understanding. Decoration in non-humans appears to function predominantly in defence against predators and parasites, although an adaptive function is often assumed rather than comprehensively demonstrated. It seems predominantly an aquatic phenomenon—presumably because buoyancy helps reduc...
Cited By1
Newest
Published on Dec 20, 2018in Palaeontology 2.63
Ricardo Pérez-de la Fuente10
Estimated H-index: 10
(University of Oxford),
Michael S. Engel36
Estimated H-index: 36
(AMNH: American Museum of Natural History)
+ 1 AuthorsEnrique Peñalver17
Estimated H-index: 17
(Instituto Geológico y Minero de España)
Published on May 29, 2019in Biologia 0.73
Jan Hinkelman (SAV: Slovak Academy of Sciences)
Morphological insect-insect mimicry is known from few Cretaceous cockroaches and a beetle. Formicamendax vrsanskyi gen. et sp. n. (Blattaria, Alienopteridae) shows myrmecomorph features such as an elongated, smooth and black body, simple fenestrated hindwing, legs lacking protective spines. Elbowed or “geniculate “antenna is a typical character of advanced ants and weevils used for different forms of communication. Together with reduced mouthparts and specialized palps still preserved grasping f...
Published on Mar 29, 2019
Carolin Haug9
Estimated H-index: 9
,
Andrés Fabián Herrera-Flórez + 1 AuthorsJoachim T. Haug9
Estimated H-index: 9
Neuropteran insects possess very distinct larval stages with prominent paired piercing sucking stylets and a specialised sclerite, the neck, between the head and the first thoracic segment. Some larva of Crocinae (Nemopteridae) are further specialised by possessing a very elongated neck region. The fossil record has already provided a large variety of neuropteran larvae, yet so far a truly long-necked form was missing. Here we report such a fossil larva, with an elongated neck region from 100-mi...