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A breakthrough in the artificial cultivation of Chinese cordyceps on a large-scale and its impact on science, the economy, and industry.

Published on Feb 17, 2019in Critical Reviews in Biotechnology 7.05
· DOI :10.1080/07388551.2018.1531820
Xiao Li (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences), Qing Liu1
Estimated H-index: 1
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
+ 4 AuthorsCaihong Dong10
Estimated H-index: 10
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
Cite
Abstract
AbstractChinese cordyceps, an entity of the Chinese caterpillar fungus (Ophiocordyceps sinensis, syn. Cordyceps sinensis) that parasitizes ghost moth larvae, is one of the best known traditional Chinese medicines and is found exclusively on the Tibetan Plateau with limited natural resources. Although the fungus O. sinensis can grow on artificial substrates and the ghost moth has been successfully reared, the large-scale artificial cultivation of Chinese cordyceps has only recently been accomplished after several decades of efforts and attempts. In this article, research progress related to this breakthrough from living habitats, the life history of the fungus, its host insect, fungal isolation and culture, host larvae rearing, infection cycle of the fungus to the host, primordium induction, and fruiting body development have been reviewed. An understanding of the basic biology of O. sinensis, its host insect and the simulation of the Tibetan alpine environment resulted in the success of artificial cultiva...
  • References (53)
  • Citations (1)
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References53
Newest
Published on Jun 1, 2018in Journal of Proteomics 3.54
Xu Zhang1
Estimated H-index: 1
(CPU: China Pharmaceutical University),
Qun Liu12
Estimated H-index: 12
(CPU: China Pharmaceutical University)
+ 4 AuthorsXiaojian Yin2
Estimated H-index: 2
(CPU: China Pharmaceutical University)
Abstract Cordyceps sinensis has gained increasing attention due to its nutritional and medicinal properties. Herein, we employed label-free quantitative mass spectrometry to explore the proteome differences between naturally- and artificially-cultivated C. sinensis . A total of 22,829 peptides with confidence ≥95%, corresponding to 2541 protein groups were identified from the caterpillar bodies/stromata of 12 naturally- and artificially-cultivated samples of C. sinensis . Among them, 165 protein...
Published on Dec 1, 2017in Scientific Reports 4.01
Lian-Xian Guo4
Estimated H-index: 4
(SYSU: Sun Yat-sen University),
Yue-Hui Hong4
Estimated H-index: 4
(SYSU: Sun Yat-sen University)
+ 3 AuthorsJiang-Hai Wang7
Estimated H-index: 7
(SYSU: Sun Yat-sen University)
For more than one thousand years, Cordyceps sinensis has been revered as a unique halidom in the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau for its mysterious life history and predominant medicinal values. This mysterious fungus-larva symbiote also attracted the over-exploitation, while several problems on the initial colonization of Ophiocordyceps sinensis in the host larva have constrained artificial cultivation. In this work, stable carbon isotope analysis was employed to analyse the subsamples of C. sinensis f...
Published on Dec 1, 2017in Scientific Reports 4.01
En-Hua Xia12
Estimated H-index: 12
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences),
Darong Yang1
Estimated H-index: 1
(XTBG: Xishuangbanna Tropical Botanical Garden)
+ 14 AuthorsYan Tong5
Estimated H-index: 5
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
To understand the potential genetic basis of highland adaptation of fungal pathogenicity, we present here the ~116 Mb de novo assembled high-quality genome of Ophiocordyceps sinensis endemic to the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau. Compared with other plain-dwelling fungi, we find about 3.4-fold inflation of the O. sinensis genome due to a rapid amplification of long terminal repeat retrotransposons that occurred ~38 million years ago in concert with the uplift of the plateau. We also observe massive rem...
Published on Nov 1, 2017in Trends in Biotechnology 13.75
Jan Martel4
Estimated H-index: 4
(CGU: Chang Gung University),
Yun-Fei Ko11
Estimated H-index: 11
(MCUT: Ming Chi University of Technology)
+ 4 AuthorsJohndingeyoung45
Estimated H-index: 45
The caterpillar fungus Ophiocordyceps sinensis is a medicinal mushroom increasingly used as a dietary supplement for various health conditions, including fatigue, chronic inflammation, and male impotence. Here, we propose strategies to address the existing challenges related to the study and commercial production of this mysterious fungus.
Published on Jul 27, 2017in Frontiers in Microbiology 4.26
Xincong Kang2
Estimated H-index: 2
(HAU: Hunan Agricultural University),
Liqin Hu2
Estimated H-index: 2
(HAU: Hunan Agricultural University)
+ 2 AuthorsDongbo Liu2
Estimated H-index: 2
Single molecule, real-time (SMRT) sequencing was used to characterize mitochondrial (mt) genome of Ophiocordycpes sinensis and to analyze the mt genome-wide pattern of epigenetic DNA modification. The complete mt genome of O. sinensis, with a size of 157,539 bp, is the fourth largest Ascomycota mt genome sequenced to date. It contained 14 conserved protein-coding genes (PCGs), 1 intronic protein rps3, 27 tRNAs and 2 rRNA subunits, which are common characteristics of the known mt genomes in Hypoc...
Published on Feb 1, 2017in Biological Conservation 4.45
Yujing Yan3
Estimated H-index: 3
(PKU: Peking University),
Yi Li6
Estimated H-index: 6
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
+ 7 AuthorsYi-Jian Yao6
Estimated H-index: 6
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
Abstract Recent climate change has been widely recognized to influence the distribution of many plants and animals, while its impacts on the distribution of fungi remain largely unknown. Here, we used Ophiocordyceps sinensis , an entomopathogenic fungus and important traditional Chinese medicine whose distribution range was reported as decreased on the Tibetan Plateau in recent decades, as an example to predict the current potential distribution and the possible range shifts in response to clima...
Published on Jan 1, 2017in Pharmacognosy Research
Chun-Hong Li4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Chongqing University),
Hua-Li Zuo4
Estimated H-index: 4
(UM: University of Macau)
+ 6 AuthorsFeng-Qing Yang24
Estimated H-index: 24
(Chongqing University)
Background: As one of the bioactive components in Cordyceps sinensis (CS), proteins were rarely used as index components to study the correlation between the protein components and producing areas of natural CS. Objective: Protein components of 26 natural CS samples produced in Qinghai, Tibet, and Sichuan provinces were analyzed and compared to investigate the relationship among 26 different producing areas. Materials and Methods: Proteins from 26 different producing areas were extracted by Tris...
Published on Dec 1, 2016in Scientific Reports 4.01
Ding-Tao Wu14
Estimated H-index: 14
,
Guang-Ping Lv13
Estimated H-index: 13
+ 4 AuthorsJing Zhao28
Estimated H-index: 28
Natural Cordyceps collected in Bhutan has been widely used as natural Cordyceps sinensis, an official species of Cordyceps used as Chinese medicines, around the world in recent years. However, whether Cordyceps from Bhutan could be really used as natural C. sinensis remains unknown. Therefore, DNA sequence, bioactive components including nucleosides and polysaccharides in twelve batches of Cordyceps from Bhutan were firstly investigated, and compared with natural C. sinensis. Results showed that...
Published on Oct 1, 2016in Phytotherapy Research 3.77
Jin Xu1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Ministry of Education),
Ying Huang1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Ministry of Education)
+ 3 AuthorsMing-He Mo2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Ministry of Education)
The entomopathogenic fungus Ophiocordyceps sinensis, formerly known as Cordyceps sinensis, has long been used as a traditional Chinese medicine for the treatment of many illnesses. In recent years its usage has increased dramatically because of the improvement of people's living standard and the emphasis on health. Such demands have resulted in over-harvesting of this fungus in the wild. Fortunately, scientists have demonstrated that artificially cultured and fermented mycelial products of O. si...
Published on Jun 1, 2016in Fungal Biology 2.70
Xin Zhong5
Estimated H-index: 5
(SYSU: Sun Yat-sen University),
Li Gu3
Estimated H-index: 3
(SYSU: Sun Yat-sen University)
+ 3 AuthorsXin Liu8
Estimated H-index: 8
(SYSU: Sun Yat-sen University)
Abstract Ophiocordyceps sinensis , also referred to as the Chinese caterpillar fungus, is a rare entomopathogenic fungus found in the Qinghai–Tibetan Plateau that is used as a traditional Chinese medicine. O. sinensis parasitizes the larvae of the ghost moth Thitarodes . Characterization of the transcriptome of O. sinensis before and after host infection may provide novel insight into the process by which the fungus interacts with Thitarodes and may help researchers understand how to sustain thi...
Cited By1
Newest
Published on Dec 1, 2019in BMC Genomics 3.50
Xiao Li (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences), Fen Wang2
Estimated H-index: 2
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
+ 6 AuthorsCaihong Dong10
Estimated H-index: 10
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
Background Chinese cordyceps, also known as Chinese caterpillar fungus (Ophiocordyceps sinensis, syn. Cordyceps sinensis), is of particular interest for its cryptic life cycle and economic and ecological importance. The large-scale artificial cultivation was succeeded recently after several decades of efforts and attempts. However, the induction of primordium, sexual development of O. sinensis and the molecular basis of its lifestyle still remain cryptic.
Haiwei Lou (Henan University of Technology), Jun-Fang Lin5
Estimated H-index: 5
(SCAU: South China Agricultural University)
+ -3 AuthorsRen-Yong Zhao1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Henan University of Technology)
As a highly valued fungus, Cordyceps militaris has been widely used all over the world. Although the wild resources of C. militaris are limited, the fruiting bodies of C. militaris have been successfully cultivated on a large-scale. However, the high-frequency degeneration of C. militaris during subculture and preservation seriously limits the development of the C. militaris industry. How to solve the degeneration of C. militaris has become an unsolved bottleneck problem throughout the whole Cor...