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Propiestus archaicus, the first Mesozoic amber inclusion of piestine rove beetles and its evolutionary and biogeographical significance (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae: Piestinae)

Published on Oct 30, 2018in Journal of Systematic Palaeontology 2.33
· DOI :10.1080/14772019.2018.1517282
Shûhei Yamamoto1
Estimated H-index: 1
(FMNH: Field Museum of Natural History),
Edilson Caron4
Estimated H-index: 4
(UFPR: Federal University of Paraná),
Sidnei Bortoluzzi2
Estimated H-index: 2
(UFPR: Federal University of Paraná)
Abstract
Fossil records of piestine rove beetles are very limited, with only two definite species from Mesozoic Chinese compressions, a single taxon from mid-Eocene Baltic amber and a doubtful Oligocene compression fossil from France. Here, a remarkable new genus and species, Propiestus archaicus gen. et sp. nov., is described based on a well-preserved individual in Upper Cretaceous Burmese amber from northern Myanmar (Cenomanian, c. 99 Ma). It represents the first piestine fossil found in Mesozoic amber. The fine morphological characters preserved as an amber inclusion enable a confident systematic placement within the subfamily based on both our detailed observations and phylogenetic analyses. The resulting trees revealed a strongly supported sister-group relationship with the extant genus Piestus, comprising all currently known piestine species from the Neotropical region and one from the Nearctic. Our new discovery is congruent with a hypothesis of the Gondwanan affinity of insects found from Burmese amber. Co...
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Published on Jan 1, 2019in Systematic Entomology 4.24
Janina L. Kypke1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Wild Center),
Alexey Solodovnikov11
Estimated H-index: 11
(Wild Center)
+ 2 AuthorsDagmara Żyła5
Estimated H-index: 5
(Wild Center)
2 Citations Source Cite
Published on Nov 1, 2018in Cretaceous Research 1.93
Hao Wu1
Estimated H-index: 1
(AMNH: American Museum of Natural History),
Liqin Li1
Estimated H-index: 1
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences),
Ming Ding1
Estimated H-index: 1
(AMNH: American Museum of Natural History)
Abstract Cyclaxyridae is a small cucujoid beetle family, and no fossil cylaxyrids have been known up to date. Here we report the first definitive Mesozoic cylaxyrid, Cyclaxyra cretacea sp. nov., based on a single well-preserved adult from the Upper Cretaceous Burmese amber. The fossil can be placed in the extant genus Cyclaxyra of Cyclaxyridae, based on its morphological similarities to the extant species, especially the single pair of large deep foveae located at the anterior half of the elytra...
3 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jul 20, 2018in Zootaxa 0.93
Mariana Chani-Posse5
Estimated H-index: 5
(CONICET: National Scientific and Technical Research Council),
Alfred F. Newton20
Estimated H-index: 20
(FMNH: Field Museum of Natural History)
+ 1 AuthorsAlexey Solodovnikov11
Estimated H-index: 11
(Wild Center)
A checklist of all described species of Philonthina, a subtribe of the staphylinid tribe Staphylinini, known to occur in Central and South America (CASA) is presented. Included for each species, and for synonyms known from CASA, is a reference to the original description, type locality and type depository, and for each species the known distribution within and outside CASA. Type material was sought in the main European and American collections where it is deposited (BMNH, MNHUB, IRSNB and FMNH) ...
3 Citations Source Cite
Published on Mar 9, 2018in Historical Biology 1.25
George Poinar26
Estimated H-index: 26
(OSU: Oregon State University)
AbstractBurmese amber is an extremely important source of mid-Cretaceous plant and animal remains with over 870 species of organisms, ranging from protozoa to vertebrates, described from this source. The amber mines are located on the West Burma Block that according to geologists was originally part of Gondwana. The present study introduces some angiosperms and insects in Burmese amber whose closest extant relatives have a Gondwanan distribution and there is no previous evidence of a Laurasian d...
14 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 2018in Systematic Entomology 4.24
Shûhei Yamamoto1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Kyushu University),
Munetoshi Maruyama1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Kyushu University)
The rove beetle subfamily Aleocharinae is the largest subfamily of animals known in terms of species richness. Two small aleocharine tribes, Gymnusini and Deinopsini, are believed to be a monophyletic clade, sister to the rest of the Aleocharinae. Although the phylogenetic relationships of the extant lineages have been well investigated, the monophyly of Gymnusini has been questioned due to a series of previous studies and the recent discovery of the aleocharine †Cretodeinopsis Cai & Huang (Dein...
7 Citations Source Cite
Published on Oct 1, 2017in Cretaceous Research 1.93
Edmund A. Jarzembowski11
Estimated H-index: 11
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences),
Bo Wang33
Estimated H-index: 33
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences),
Daran Zheng6
Estimated H-index: 6
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
Abstract A new tetraphalerin beetle, Tetraphalerus lindae sp. nov. (Insecta: Coleoptera: Archostemata) is described from mid-Cretaceous Burmese amber from northern Myanmar. This is the first species of this Jurassic-recent genus of archaic beetles to be described from amber inclusions, and is the first tetraphalerin cupedid from Burmese amber. This small, unusual Cretaceous Tetraphalerus is considered to belong to the T. bruchi species group of this now relict South American genus.
4 Citations Source Cite
Published on Oct 1, 2017in Cretaceous Research 1.93
Chenyang Cai13
Estimated H-index: 13
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences),
Diying Huang18
Estimated H-index: 18
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
Abstract Mesozoic leiodids are poorly known, and only one definitive leiodid is formally described from Burmese amber. Here we describe and illustrate the second definitive Mesozoic leiodid, Cretagyrtodes glabratus gen. et sp. nov., based on a single specimen from the Upper Cretaceous Burmese amber. The fossil is placed in Agyrtodini (subfamily Camiarinae) after maxillary palpomere 4 as wide as palpomere 3, and procoxal cavities closed behind. Cretagyrtodes is tentatively attributed to the extan...
4 Citations Source Cite
Published on Oct 1, 2017in Cretaceous Research 1.93
Paweł Jałoszyński8
Estimated H-index: 8
(AMNH: American Museum of Natural History),
Shûhei Yamamoto8
Estimated H-index: 8
(Kyushu University),
Yui Takahashi5
Estimated H-index: 5
(University of Tsukuba)
Abstract †Lepicerus mumia Jaloszynski & Yamamoto, sp. nov. is described based on a Cenomanian Myanmar amber inclusion. This is the third known and the best preserved fossil of ‘lepiceroid’ myxophagan beetles, making it possible to carry out a more detailed comparative study than previously published findings. Detailed analyses of diagnostic characters given by previous authors for †Haplochelus (†Haplochelidae) and †Lepichelus (= Lepiceroides ) (Lepiceridae) led to conclusions that some features ...
8 Citations Source Cite
Published on Sep 1, 2017in Gondwana Research 5.66
Lida Xing18
Estimated H-index: 18
(China University of Geosciences),
Jingmai K. O'Connor22
Estimated H-index: 22
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
+ 4 AuthorsMing Bai15
Estimated H-index: 15
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
Abstract Burmese amber has recently provided some detailed glimpses of plumage, soft tissues, and osteology of juvenile enantiornithine birds, but these insights have been restricted to isolated wing apices. Here we describe nearly half of a hatchling individual, based on osteological and soft tissue data obtained from the skull, neck, feet, and wing, and identified as a member of the extinct avian clade Enantiornithes. Preserved soft tissue provides the unique opportunity to observe the externa...
19 Citations Source Cite