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The Simulation of the Whole-Body Vibration Experienced During Military Land Transit

Published on Dec 1, 2018
· DOI :10.1007/s41314-018-0015-z
Thomas A Debenedictis3
Estimated H-index: 3
(UniSA: University of South Australia),
Francois Fraysee7
Estimated H-index: 7
(UniSA: University of South Australia)
+ 4 AuthorsDominic Thewlis15
Estimated H-index: 15
(University of Adelaide)
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Abstract
The simulation of field-based exposures, such as the random whole-body vibration (WBV) experienced during periods of military land transit, in a laboratory setting, allows for greater control over potentially confounding factors. This paper describes a method used to simulate the WBV experienced during military land transit. Acceleration data were collected during military transit. These data were used as the command signal to control a 6 degree-of-freedom Stewart platform. The accelerations of the Stewart platform were then compared to the measured military transit accelerations to validate the approach. Our analysis identified moderate accuracy in the 0–3 Hz frequency range for both simulations. The sealed road simulation demonstrated 17, 25, and 8% error and the cross-country simulation, 4, 7, and 4% error in the x, y, and z-axes, respectively. Outside of this frequency range, the error was ≤ 2%. The accurate simulation of the mechanical WBV experienced during periods of motorised military land transit will allow future laboratory-based studies to explore the impact of these forces on Australian Defence Force personnel.
  • References (20)
  • Citations (0)
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References20
Newest
Robert J. Savage4
Estimated H-index: 4
,
Daniel C. Billing6
Estimated H-index: 6
(DST: Defence Science and Technology Organisation)
+ 2 AuthorsBrad Aisbett15
Estimated H-index: 15
(Deakin University)
Introduction In the occupational environment, there are a considerable number of stressors that can affect physical performance in job tasks. Whole-body vibration (WBV), which arises from vehicle transit, is one such stressor that has been demonstrated to alter human function in several ways. This study identifies the known physical changes to human function which result from WBV, to comment on changes which may translate to performance in physically demanding occupational tasks.
Published on Sep 1, 2015in Applied Ergonomics 2.61
Neil J. Mansfield22
Estimated H-index: 22
(Lboro: Loughborough University),
George M. Sammonds3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Lboro: Loughborough University),
Linh Nguyen1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Lboro: Loughborough University)
Discomfort in vehicle seats is a multi-factorial problem with contributions occurring from effects of sitting duration, seat design, and the dynamic environment to which the occupant is exposed. This paper reports laboratory studies investigating the extent to which reports of discomfort are affected by vibration commencing or ceasing, and whether methods of assessment are sensitive enough to detect small changes in foam composition. Study 1 measured discomfort ratings for two conditions of 60 m...
Published on Jun 3, 2015in Journal of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene 1.34
Ryan P. Blood6
Estimated H-index: 6
(UW: University of Washington),
Michael G. Yost31
Estimated H-index: 31
(UW: University of Washington)
+ 1 AuthorsRandal P. Ching24
Estimated H-index: 24
(UW: University of Washington)
Long-term exposure to seated whole-body vibration (WBV) is one of the leading risk factors for the development of low back disorders. Professional bus and truck drivers are regularly exposed to continuous WBV, since they spend the majority of their working hours driving heavy vehicles. This study measured WBV exposures among professional bus and truck drivers and evaluated the effects of seat-suspension designs using simulated field-collected data on a vibration table. WBV exposures were measure...
Published on Nov 1, 2011in Military Medicine 0.85
Brianna Larsen7
Estimated H-index: 7
(Deakin University),
Kevin Netto15
Estimated H-index: 15
(Deakin University),
Brad Aisbett15
Estimated H-index: 15
(Deakin University)
ABSTRACTArmed forces worldwide utilize some form of body armor as part of their personal protective system. This is particularly essential in recent times because of the increased sophistication of weapons employed during modern warfare and the advent of unconventional combat methods (such as the increased use of improvised explosive devices). There is some evidence to show, however, that the usage of military body armor impairs physical performance. This review of the literature will focus on t...
Published on Sep 1, 2011in European Journal of Applied Physiology 3.06
Stephen D. Myers9
Estimated H-index: 9
(University of Chichester),
Trevor D. Dobbins3
Estimated H-index: 3
+ 5 AuthorsRosemary Dyson11
Estimated H-index: 11
(University of Chichester)
The purpose of this study was to investigate the consequences of a high-speed boat transit on physical performance. Twenty-four Royal Marines were randomly assigned to a control (CON) or transit (TRAN) group. The CON group sat onshore for 3 h whilst the TRAN group completed a 3-h transit in open-boats running side-by-side, at 40 knots in moderate-to-rough seas, with boat deck and seat-pan acceleration recorded. Performance tests (exhaustive shuttle-run, handgrip, vertical-jump, push-up) were com...
Published on Sep 1, 2011in Military Medicine 0.85
Alison K. Laing Treloar2
Estimated H-index: 2
(DST: Defence Science and Technology Organisation),
Daniel C. Billing6
Estimated H-index: 6
(DST: Defence Science and Technology Organisation)
ABSTRACTThis study examined the effects of load carriage on performance of an explosive, anaerobic military task. A task-specific assessment requiring five 30-m timed sprints was developed to address this question. Seventeen soldiers (female = 5, male = 12) volunteered to undergo the test under two experimental conditions: unloaded (combat uniform and boots) and loaded (unloaded plus 21.6 kg fighting load, comprising webbing, weapon, helmet, and combat body armor). When loaded, there was a signi...
Bibhuti Bhusan Mandal3
Estimated H-index: 3
,
A. K. Srivastava1
Estimated H-index: 1
(IITR: Indian Institute of Toxicology Research)
Dumper operators are exposed to whole body vibration (WBV) in the course of their work. The exposure to WBV in a coal mine in Central India was investigated through measurement of the magnitude of vibration and exposure time. The vibration magnitude along the dominant Z-axis ranged from 0.644 to 1.82 m/s2 in terms of root mean square acceleration. When evaluated in conjunction with their average daily exposure time of 5 h, all dumpers caused elevated health risk for their operators according to ...
James P. Dickey9
Estimated H-index: 9
,
Tammy Eger13
Estimated H-index: 13
,
Michele Oliver10
Estimated H-index: 10
Background: Whole-body vibration is a significant workplace risk factor for discomfort and injury in many work sectors. The current approach for evaluating vibration exposures typically involves field studies of seatpan acceleration while the operators perform typical workplace activities. These vibration exposures are then compared to international standards to evaluate the risk of discomfort or injury. This approach does not enable systematic and controlled study of specific workplace factors ...
Published on Sep 1, 2009in The Medical journal of Malaysia
Rozali A3
Estimated H-index: 3
,
Rampal Kg2
Estimated H-index: 2
(UKM: National University of Malaysia)
+ 4 AuthorsAbdul Razak Sulaiman8
Estimated H-index: 8
A cross sectional study was conducted among military armoured vehicle drivers in the two largest mechanized battalions with the objective to determine the prevalence of low back pain (LBP), and its association with whole body vibration (WBV) and other associated factors. A self-administered questionnaire and Human Vibration Meter were used in this study. A total of 159 respondents participated in this study and 102 (64.2%) of them were subjected to WBV measurement. One-hundred-and-seventeen resp...
Published on Jul 1, 2009in Ergonomics 2.18
Idsart Kingma37
Estimated H-index: 37
(VU: VU University Amsterdam),
J Vandieen61
Estimated H-index: 61
(VU: VU University Amsterdam)
The aim of this study was to test the effect of a movable backrest on vibration transmission through the trunk during driving and on the physiological consequences thereof. Eleven healthy male subjects drove for about 1 h on normal roads with a movable and with a fixed backrest while surface electromyography (EMG) was measured at the level of the fifth lumbar vertebra (L5) and vertical accelerations were measured at the seat, backrest and at the spine at the levels of the second sacral vertebra ...
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