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Accelerated Development and Toxin Tolerance of the Navel Orangeworm Amyelois transitella (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) in the Presence of Aspergillus flavus

Published on Dec 1, 2018in Journal of Chemical Ecology2.45
· DOI :10.1007/s10886-018-1027-0
Daniel S. Bush2
Estimated H-index: 2
(UIUC: University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign),
Joel P. Siegel14
Estimated H-index: 14
(ARS: Agricultural Research Service),
May R. Berenbaum67
Estimated H-index: 67
(UIUC: University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign)
Cite
Abstract
The navel orangeworm (Amyelois transitella) and the fungus Aspergillus flavus constitute a facultative mutualism and pest complex in tree nut and fruit orchards in California. The possibility exists that the broad detoxification capabilities of A. flavus benefit its insect associate by metabolizing toxicants, including hostplant phytochemicals and pesticides. We examined this hypothesis by conducting laboratory bioassays to assess growth rates and survivorship of pyrethroid-resistant (R347) and susceptible (CPQ) larval strains on potato dextrose agar diet containing almond meal with and without two furanocoumarins, xanthotoxin and bergapten, found in several hostplants, and with and without two insecticides, bifenthrin and spinetoram, used in almond and pistachio orchards. Additionally, fungi were incubated in liquid diets containing the test chemicals, and extracts of these diets were added to almond potato dextrose agar (PDA) diets and fed to larvae to evaluate the ability of the fungus to metabolize these chemicals. Larvae consuming furanocoumarin-containing diet experienced higher mortality than individuals on unamended diets, but adding A. flavus resulted in up to 61.7% greater survival. Aspergillus flavus in the diet increased development rate > two-fold when furanocoumarins were present, demonstrating fungal enhancement of diet quality. Adding extracts of liquid diets containing xanthotoxin and fungus decreased mortality compared to xanthotoxin alone. On diets containing bifenthrin and spinetoram, however, mortality increased. These results support the hypothesis that A. flavus enhances navel orangeworm performance and contributes to detoxification of xenobiotics. Among practical implications of our findings, this mutualistic association should be considered in designing chemical management strategies for these pests.
  • References (40)
  • Citations (1)
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References40
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Published on Jun 1, 2018in Journal of Pest Science5.13
Mark R. Demkovich4
Estimated H-index: 4
(UIUC: University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign),
Joel P. Siegel14
Estimated H-index: 14
(ARS: Agricultural Research Service)
+ 1 AuthorsMay R. Berenbaum67
Estimated H-index: 67
(UIUC: University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign)
The navel orangeworm (Amyelois transitella) (Walker) is a destructive pest of tree nuts in California orchards. Overall demand for these crops and acreage expansions have resulted in significant insecticide applications to reduce A. transitella damage. Despite widespread use in A. transitella insecticide applications, the potential toxicity of adjuvants applied in combination with insecticides remains uncharacterized. In these experiments, five adjuvants (Cohere®, Dyne-Amic®, FastStrike®, Induce...
Published on Oct 12, 2017in Revista de la Sociedad Química de Mexico
John J. Beck15
Estimated H-index: 15
(USDA: United States Department of Agriculture)
The navel orangeworm (Amyelois transitella) is a major insect pest that brings about significant monetary damage to Cali- fornia tree nuts - almonds, pistachios, and walnuts. During their de- velopment, larvae of navel orangeworm feed upon the meat of these nuts causing physical damage and ultimately lowering kernel quality. Moreover, the larvae have been purported to vector aflatoxigenic fungi into the food product and thus represent a serious food safety concern. Aflatoxins are toxic metabolit...
Published on Jun 1, 2017in Environmental Entomology1.45
Daniel S. Bush2
Estimated H-index: 2
(UIUC: University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign),
Allen Lawrance3
Estimated H-index: 3
(UIUC: University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign)
+ 1 AuthorsMay R. Berenbaum67
Estimated H-index: 67
Published on Feb 1, 2016in Environmental Entomology1.45
Eline A. Ampt1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UIUC: University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign),
Daniel S. Bush2
Estimated H-index: 2
(UIUC: University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign)
+ 1 AuthorsMay R. Berenbaum67
Estimated H-index: 67
(UIUC: University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign)
The navel orangeworm, Amyelois transitella (Walker), is a polyphagous pest of California nut crops and is responsible for extensive losses in the United States. It directly damages crops by feeding and contaminating nuts with frass and webbing and vectors saprophytic fungi that infect crops. The navel orangeworm is commonly associated with Aspergillus species, including the toxigenic Aspergillus flavus , which causes crop loss by producing carcinogens, including aflatoxin B1. This lepidopteran–f...
Published on Jan 1, 2016in Journal of Insect Science1.45
Vikram A. Bagchi1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UIUC: University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign),
Joel P. Siegel14
Estimated H-index: 14
(ARS: Agricultural Research Service)
+ 2 AuthorsMay R. Berenbaum67
Estimated H-index: 67
(UIUC: University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign)
For some polyphagous insects, adaptation to phytochemically novel plants can enhance resistance to certain pesticides, but whether pesticide resistance expands tolerance to phytochemicals has not been examined. Amyelois transitella Walker (navel orangeworm) is an important polyphagous pest of nut and fruit tree crops in California. Bifenthrin resistance, partially attributable to enhanced cytochrome P450 (P450)-mediated detoxification, has been reported in an almond-infesting population exposed ...
Published on Jan 1, 2016in Journal of Insect Science1.45
Shih-Wei Su1
Estimated H-index: 1
(NSYSU: National Sun Yat-sen University),
Tse-Min Lee1
Estimated H-index: 1
(NSYSU: National Sun Yat-sen University)
+ 1 AuthorsEddie Hang Chio3
Estimated H-index: 3
(NTU: National Taiwan University)
The methanol and ethyl acetate (EA) extracts of four species of sea lily ( Himerometra magnipinna, Comaster multifidus , Comanthina sp., and Comatella maculata ) were evaluated for their insecticidal activity against Yellow-fever mosquito larvae ( Aedes aegypti ) and their repellency against adult Asian Tiger mosquitoes ( Aedes albopictus ). The 24-hr minimum inhibition concentration (MIC) data revealed that the extracts from H. magnipinna and the C. maculata were the most active, killing mosqui...
Published on Dec 1, 2015in Journal of Economic Entomology1.78
Mark R. Demkovich4
Estimated H-index: 4
(UIUC: University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign),
Catherine E. Dana2
Estimated H-index: 2
(UIUC: University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign)
+ 1 AuthorsMay R. Berenbaum67
Estimated H-index: 67
(UIUC: University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign)
ABSTRACT Amyelois transitella (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), the navel orangeworm, is a highly polyphagous economic pest of almond, pistachio, and walnut crops in California. Increasing demand for these crops and their rising economic value has resulted in substantial increases of insecticide applications to reduce damage to acceptable levels. The effects of piperonyl butoxide (PBO), a methylenedioxyphenyl compound that can act as a synergist by inhibiting cytochrome P450-mediated detoxifica...
Published on Nov 1, 2015in Nature Communications11.88
Javier A. Ceja-Navarro4
Estimated H-index: 4
,
Fernando E. Vega34
Estimated H-index: 34
+ 7 AuthorsEoin L. Brodie54
Estimated H-index: 54
The coffee berry borer (Hypothenemus hampei) is the most devastating insect pest of coffee worldwide with its infestations decreasing crop yield by up to 80%. Caffeine is an alkaloid that can be toxic to insects and is hypothesized to act as a defence mechanism to inhibit herbivory. Here we show that caffeine is degraded in the gut of H. hampei, and that experimental inactivation of the gut microbiota eliminates this activity. We demonstrate that gut microbiota in H. hampei specimens from seven ...
Published on Nov 1, 2015in Medical Mycology2.85
Seyedmojtaba Seyedmousavi17
Estimated H-index: 17
(Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences),
Jacques Guillot34
Estimated H-index: 34
(École nationale vétérinaire d'Alfort)
+ 4 AuthorsPaul E. Verweij66
Estimated H-index: 66
(Radboud University Nijmegen)
The importance of aspergillosis in humans and various animal species has increased over the last decades. Aspergillus species are found worldwide in humans and in almost all domestic animals and birds as well as in many wild species, causing a wide range of diseases from localized infections to fatal disseminated diseases, as well as allergic responses to inhaled conidia. Some prevalent forms of animal aspergillosis are invasive fatal infections in sea fan corals, stonebrood mummification in hon...
Published on Jun 1, 2015in Environmental Entomology1.45
Mark R. Demkovich4
Estimated H-index: 4
(UIUC: University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign),
Joel P. Siegel14
Estimated H-index: 14
(ARS: Agricultural Research Service)
+ 1 AuthorsMay R. Berenbaum67
Estimated H-index: 67
(UIUC: University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign)
The polyphagous navel orangeworm, Amyelois transitella (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), is the most destructive pest of nut crops, including almonds and pistachios, in California orchards. Management of this insect has typically been a combination of cultural controls and insecticide use, with the latter increasing substantially along with the value of these commodities. Possibly associated with increased insecticide use, resistance has been observed recently in navel orangeworm populations in...