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Worry and anxiety account for unique variance in the relationship between intolerance of uncertainty and depression

Published on May 4, 2019in Cognitive Behaviour Therapy 2.84
· DOI :10.1080/16506073.2018.1533579
Michaela B. Swee1
Estimated H-index: 1
(TU: Temple University),
Thomas M. Olino31
Estimated H-index: 31
(TU: Temple University),
Richard G. Heimberg86
Estimated H-index: 86
(TU: Temple University)
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Abstract
ABSTRACTThe evidence supporting the relationship between intolerance of uncertainty (IU), a cognitive construct well established in the anxiety literature, and depression is mixed. Some research has demonstrated a direct association between IU and depression, whereas other studies suggest that IU is either unrelated or indirectly related to depression through other pathways, including anxiety. The present study aimed to further elucidate the relationship between IU and depression in an undergraduate sample (N = 221). We posited a model in which worry and anxiety account for unique variance in the association between IU and depression. Results supported this hypothesis. Worry and trait anxiety significantly accounted for unique variance in the relationship between IU and depression. Furthermore, the model that best fit the data included two additional direct paths, from IU to anxiety and from worry to depression, and excluded the direct path from IU to depression. Our findings support the notion that IU an...
  • References (36)
  • Citations (0)
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References36
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Published on Nov 1, 2016in Cognitive Behaviour Therapy 2.84
Dane Jensen5
Estimated H-index: 5
(TU: Temple University),
Jonah N. Cohen4
Estimated H-index: 4
(TU: Temple University)
+ 2 AuthorsRichard G. Heimberg86
Estimated H-index: 86
(TU: Temple University)
Increasing evidence suggests that intolerance of uncertainty (IU) may be a transdiagnostic factor across the anxiety disorders, and to a lesser extent, unipolar depression. Whereas anxiety inherently involves uncertainty regarding threat, depression has traditionally been associated with certainty (e.g. the hopelessness theory of depression). Some theorists posit that the observed relationship between depression and IU may be due to the relationship between depression and anxiety and the relatio...
Published on Jun 1, 2016in Journal of Anxiety Disorders 3.47
Peter M. McEvoy31
Estimated H-index: 31
(Curtin University),
David M. Erceg-Hurn4
Estimated H-index: 4
Abstract The search for universal processes associated with symptom change across emotional disorders and different forms of psychotherapy offers hope of increased theoretical parsimony and treatment efficiencies. This study investigated whether intolerance of uncertainty (IU) is a universal process by examining whether changes in IU were associated with changes in symptoms across three different cognitive behavior therapy protocols for depression ( n = 106), social anxiety disorder ( n = 88), o...
Published on Apr 1, 2016in Journal of Anxiety Disorders 3.47
R. Nicholas Carleton30
Estimated H-index: 30
(University of Regina)
Abstract The current review and synthesis serves to define and contextualize fear of the unknown relative to related constructs, such as intolerance of uncertainty, and contemporary models of emotion, attachment, and neuroticism. The contemporary models appear to share a common core in underscoring the importance of responses to unknowns. A recent surge in published research has explored the transdiagnostic impact of not knowing on anxiety and related pathologies; as such, there appears to be mo...
Published on Jan 2, 2015in Cognitive Behaviour Therapy 2.84
Dane Jensen5
Estimated H-index: 5
(TU: Temple University),
Richard G. Heimberg86
Estimated H-index: 86
(TU: Temple University)
Intolerance of uncertainty (IU) has been increasingly recognized as a transdiagnostic factor across anxiety disorders and depression and is associated with substantial cognitive, behavioral, and emotional impairment. IU is typically construed as a dispositional tendency to view ambiguous stimuli and unknown outcomes as unacceptably threatening regardless of context, but recent findings suggest that the domain in which uncertainty is encountered may be relevant. Taking that research to the next s...
Published on Mar 1, 2012in Cognitive Behaviour Therapy 2.84
Alison E.J. Mahoney16
Estimated H-index: 16
(St. Vincent's Health System),
Peter M. McEvoy31
Estimated H-index: 31
(UWA: University of Western Australia)
Intolerance of uncertainty (IU) has been most heavily implicated in the development and maintenance of generalised anxiety disorder; however, recent research has supported the transdiagnostic conceptualisation of IU by demonstrating that IU contributes to a broad array of symptoms associated with multiple anxiety and depressive disorders. The aim of this study was to examine IU firstly as a trait variable and secondly in reference to a regularly occurring, diagnostically relevant situation in a ...
Published on Aug 1, 2010in Journal of Anxiety Disorders 3.47
Keunyoung Yook5
Estimated H-index: 5
,
Keun-Hyang Kim3
Estimated H-index: 3
+ 1 AuthorsKang Soo Lee15
Estimated H-index: 15
Intolerance of uncertainty (IU) can be defined as a cognitive bias that affects how a person perceives, interprets, and responds to uncertain situations. Although IU has been reported mainly in literature relating to worry and anxiety symptoms, it may be also important to investigate the relationship between IU, rumination, and depression in a clinical sample. Furthermore, individuals who are intolerant of uncertainty easily experience stress and could cope with stressful situations using repeti...
Published on Jun 1, 2010in Journal of Anxiety Disorders 3.47
Peter M. McEvoy31
Estimated H-index: 31
(UWA: University of Western Australia),
Alison E.J. Mahoney16
Estimated H-index: 16
,
Michelle L. Moulds39
Estimated H-index: 39
(UNSW: University of New South Wales)
Abstract Accumulating evidence suggests that repetitive negative thinking (RNT) is a transdiagnostic phenomenon. However, various forms of RNT such as worry, rumination, and post-event processing have been assessed using separate measures and have almost exclusively been examined within the anxiety, depression, and social phobia literatures, respectively. A single transdiagnostic measure of RNT would facilitate the identification of transdiagnostic maintaining factors of RNT, and would be more e...
Published on Feb 1, 2009in Current Directions in Psychological Science 4.48
David P. MacKinnon57
Estimated H-index: 57
,
Amanda J. Fairchild13
Estimated H-index: 13
(USC: University of South Carolina)
Mediating variables continue to play an important role in psychological theory and research. A mediating variable transmits the effect of an antecedent variable on to a dependent variable, thereby providing more detailed understanding of relations among variables. Methods to assess mediation have been an active area of research for the last two decades. This paper describes the current state of methods to investigate mediating variables.
Published on Oct 1, 2008in Behaviour Research and Therapy 4.31
Regina Miranda20
Estimated H-index: 20
(CUNY: City University of New York),
Monique Fontes2
Estimated H-index: 2
(CUNY: City University of New York),
Brett Marroquín11
Estimated H-index: 11
(CUNY: City University of New York)
Abstract The present study examined cognitive content-specificity in future-event predictions associated with symptoms of depression and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). College undergraduates ( N = 284) completed measures of depression, GAD, and rated their certainty that a given set of positive and negative outcomes were or were not likely to happen in their future. Participants also completed measures of hopelessness and intolerance of uncertainty (IU). Individuals ( N = 263) completed the...
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