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Critical Reflections on Mental Well-being for Post-Secondary Students Participating in the Field of Global Health

Published on Oct 23, 2018in International Journal of Mental Health and Addiction 1.19
· DOI :10.1007/s11469-018-0007-5
Corey McAuliffe (U of T: University of Toronto), Ross Upshur46
Estimated H-index: 46
(U of T: University of Toronto)
+ 1 AuthorsErica Di Ruggiero9
Estimated H-index: 9
(U of T: University of Toronto)
Abstract
The ways in which global health students experience trauma/distress while conducting global health fieldwork is understudied. No identifiable literature addresses the risks to students’ mental well-being, although physical wellness checks exist. Importantly, global health practitioners are at greater risk than the general population for moral distress, secondary-traumatic stress disorder, vicarious traumatization, compassion fatigue, burnout, stress, and anxiety. Students face increased risks (e.g., illness, physical safety), especially in respect to their mental well-being. While academic institutions often require pre-departure trainings, research suggests that they are insufficient or ineffective. Challenges are not only limited to before and during one’s placement, but can be intensified after returning home due to concerns about one’s reputation, being perceived as not able to cope, or feeling ethically/morally obliged to continue research that can be re-traumatizing. This paper critically reflects on these knowledge gaps and on how the lack of appropriate resources and supports has ethical and practical implications for students, the wider academic community, and the communities in which they work.
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Published on Mar 1, 2019in Area 2.19
Faith Tucker10
Estimated H-index: 10
(University of Northampton),
John Horton19
Estimated H-index: 19
(University of Northampton)
Fieldwork is central to the identity, culture and history of academic Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences (GEES). However, in this paper we recognise that, for many academic staff, fieldtrips can be a profoundly challenging ‘ordeal’, ill-conducive to wellness or effective pedagogic practice. Drawing upon research with 39 UK university-based GEES academics who self-identify as having a mental health condition, we explore how mental health intersects with spaces and expectations of fieldwo...
2 Citations Source Cite
Published on Nov 29, 2018
Erica Di Ruggiero9
Estimated H-index: 9
,
Danielle MacPherson1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Uttam Bajwa1
Estimated H-index: 1
1 Citations Source Cite
Published on Nov 1, 2017in Symbolic Interaction 0.67
Ashleigh E. McKinzie3
Estimated H-index: 3
(UGA: University of Georgia)
This paper examines reflections about researcher emotions and the experience of having panic attacks and panic disorder as a result of fieldwork. Anxiety and panic are sparsely discussed in methodological appendices and handbooks about qualitative research, and the embodiment of mental health in the field has received even less attention. I have two aims in the paper: to describe the experience of panic attacks and to open a discussion about panic and anxiety attacks in the field. The failure to...
2 Citations Source Cite
Published on Sep 1, 2017in Sociological Forum 1.62
Rebecca Hanson2
Estimated H-index: 2
(UGA: University of Georgia),
Patricia Richards9
Estimated H-index: 9
(UGA: University of Georgia)
It is not uncommon for women researchers to experience sexualized interactions, sexual objectification, and harassment as they conduct fieldwork. Nevertheless, these experiences are often left out of ethnographers’ “tales from the field” and remain unaddressed within our discipline. In this article, we use women's experiences with harassment in the field to interrogate the epistemological foundations of ethnographic methodology within the discipline of sociology. Based on more than 50 qualitativ...
10 Citations Source Cite
Published on Sep 1, 2017in Ethnography 0.85
Sinah Theres Kloß1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Cologne)
Sexual(ized) harassment during ethnographic fieldwork is often described by female researchers as a ‘rather common’ experience, yet it continues to be marginalized in methodological discussions and anthropological training. Rather than silencing accounts of these experiences, it is necessary to include them in the analysis of acquired data and to reflect on them in ethnographic writing. This article raises awareness and stimulates discussion about this neglected aspect of social research. It con...
4 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jun 27, 2017in Global health, science and practice
Mary Surya1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Dilshad Jaff2
Estimated H-index: 2
(UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)
+ 1 AuthorsJohanna Schubert1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)
2 Citations Source Cite
Published on May 1, 2017in Research Policy 4.66
Katia Levecque16
Estimated H-index: 16
(UGent: Ghent University),
Frederik Anseel21
Estimated H-index: 21
(UGent: Ghent University)
+ 2 AuthorsLydia Gisle7
Estimated H-index: 7
Research policy observers are increasingly concerned about the potential impact of current academic working conditions on mental health, particularly in PhD students. The aim of the current study is threefold. First, we assess the prevalence of mental health problems in a representative sample of PhD students in Flanders, Belgium (N = 3659). Second, we compare PhD students to three other samples: (1) highly educated in the general population (N = 769); (2) highly educated employees (N = 592); an...
52 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 11, 2017in Nature 41.58
Emily Sohn3
Estimated H-index: 3
1 Citations Source Cite
Published on Aug 1, 2016in Qualitative Research 2.95
Nikki Kiyimba4
Estimated H-index: 4
(University of Chester),
Michelle O’Reilly10
Estimated H-index: 10
(University of Leicester)
Kiyimba, N. & O'Reilly, M., The risk of secondary traumatic stress in the qualitative transcription process: a research note, Qualitative Research (16:4) pp. 468-476. Copyright © Nikki Kiyimba & Michelle O'Reilly, 2015. Reprinted by permission of SAGE Publications.
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