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How does exposure to thinspiration and fitspiration relate to symptom severity among individuals with eating disorders? Evaluation of a proposed model

Published on Dec 1, 2018in Body Image 3.12
· DOI :10.1016/j.bodyim.2018.10.002
Scott Griffiths14
Estimated H-index: 14
(University of Melbourne),
David Castle56
Estimated H-index: 56
(University of Melbourne)
+ 3 AuthorsFiona Kate Barlow19
Estimated H-index: 19
(UQ: University of Queensland)
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Abstract
Abstract Thinspiration and fitspiration are classes of social media content characterised by idealised depictions of excessively thin and overtly fit/lean bodies, respectively. It is currently unknown whether and how exposure to thinspiration and fitspiration relates to symptom severity within high-risk clinical populations. Thus, in a clinical sample of individuals with eating disorders, we evaluated a model explaining how exposure to thinspiration and fitspiration relates to eating disorder symptoms. Individuals with self-reported eating disorders ( N = 228, 47% with anorexia, 93% female) completed measures of image-centric social media use, thinspiration and fitspiration exposure, physical appearance comparisons, and symptom severity. Results showed that more frequent use of image-centric social media was associated with more frequent exposures to both thinspiration and fitspiration. In turn, these exposures were associated with more frequent physical appearance comparisons, and through these, greater symptom severity. Physical appearance comparisons mediated the relationships of both thinspiration and fitspiration exposure with symptom severity. Exposure to fitspiration was more common than exposure to thinspiration. However, thinspiration exposure evidenced stronger associations with symptom severity than fitspiration exposure. In conclusion, our model provides a useful account of how eating disorder symptoms relate to thinspiration and fitspiration exposure, and to image-centric social media more generally.
  • References (69)
  • Citations (1)
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References69
Newest
Published on Nov 1, 2018in Sex Roles 2.28
Frances Bozsik2
Estimated H-index: 2
(UMKC: University of Missouri–Kansas City),
Brooke L. Whisenhunt3
Estimated H-index: 3
(MSU: Missouri State University)
+ 2 AuthorsJennifer D. Lundgren22
Estimated H-index: 22
(UMKC: University of Missouri–Kansas City)
Research has documented an increased emphasis on fitness in media targeting women. However, it is unclear whether this emphasis has resulted in increased muscularity in the perceived ideal female body shape. We sought to evaluate whether the ideal female figure has incorporated increased muscularity into the existing ideal body type that already emphasizes thinness. In Study 1, 78 female undergraduates evaluated images of U.S. beauty pageant winners over the past 15 years on dimensions of thinne...
Published on Jun 1, 2018in Body Image 3.12
Marika Tiggemann74
Estimated H-index: 74
(Flinders University),
Owen Churches11
Estimated H-index: 11
(Flinders University)
+ 1 AuthorsZoe Brown4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Flinders University)
Abstract Thinspiration and fitspiration represent contemporary online trends designed to inspire viewers towards the thin ideal or towards health and fitness respectively. The aim of the present study was to compare thinspiration and fitspiration communities on Twitter. A total of 3289 English-language tweets with hashtags related to thinspiration ( n = 1181) and fitspiration ( n = 2578) were collected over a two-week period. Network analysis showed minimal overlap between the communities on Twi...
Published on Apr 1, 2018in New Media & Society 4.80
Jasmine Fardouly9
Estimated H-index: 9
,
Brydie K Willburger1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UNSW: University of New South Wales),
Lenny R. Vartanian30
Estimated H-index: 30
(UNSW: University of New South Wales)
This study examined the relationship between Instagram use (overall, as well as specifically viewing fitspiration images) and body image concerns and self-objectification among women between the ages of 18 and 25 from the United States (n = 203) and from Australia (n = 73). Furthermore, this study tested whether internalization of the societal beauty ideal, appearance comparison tendency in general, or appearance comparisons to specific target groups on Instagram mediated any relationships betwe...
Published on Mar 1, 2018in Body Image 3.12
Madeline R. Wick1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Pepperdine University),
Jennifer A. Harriger4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Pepperdine University)
Abstract Thinspiration is content advocating extreme weight loss by means of images and/or text posts. While past content analyses have examined thinspiration content on social media and other websites, no research to date has examined thinspiration content on Tumblr. Over the course of a week, 222 images and text posts were collected after entering the keyword ‘thinspiration’ into the Tumblr search bar. These images were then rated on a variety of characteristics. The majority of thinspiration ...
Published on Jan 24, 2018in Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking 2.65
Scott Griffiths14
Estimated H-index: 14
(University of Melbourne),
Stuart B. Murray19
Estimated H-index: 19
(UCSF: University of California, San Francisco)
+ 1 AuthorsSiân A. McLean15
Estimated H-index: 15
(VU: Victoria University, Australia)
Abstract Social media has been associated with body dissatisfaction and eating disorder symptoms among young women and adolescent girls. However, despite notable evidence of susceptibility to body image pressures, it remains unknown whether these associations generalize to sexual minority men. A nationwide sample of 2,733 sexual minority men completed an online survey advertised to Australian and New Zealand users of a popular dating app. Participants answered questions about how frequently they...
Published on Jan 4, 2018in Preventing Chronic Disease 2.04
Jenine K. Harris22
Estimated H-index: 22
,
Alexis E. Duncan21
Estimated H-index: 21
+ 3 AuthorsPatricia A. Cavazos-Rehg22
Estimated H-index: 22
Published on Jan 1, 2018in Sex Roles 2.28
Rachel F. Rodgers21
Estimated H-index: 21
(NU: Northeastern University),
Debra L. Franko49
Estimated H-index: 49
(NU: Northeastern University)
+ 3 AuthorsAtsushi Matsumoto4
Estimated H-index: 4
(NU: Northeastern University)
Socially promoted physical appearance ideals for women place increasing importance on muscularity, resulting in growing muscularity concerns among traditional college-age women. To date, however, instruments for assessing the type of muscularity concerns reported by women are lacking. The aim of the present study was therefore to develop such a scale and examine its psychometric properties among a sample of young women. Findings from an exploratory factor analysis (n = 235) and a confirmatory fa...
Published on Jan 1, 2018
Aaron Smith and Monica Anderson1
Estimated H-index: 1
Published on Dec 1, 2017in The Journal of Eating Disorders
Catherine Victoria Talbot1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Exeter),
Jeff Gavin16
Estimated H-index: 16
(University of Bath)
+ 1 AuthorsYvette Morey6
Estimated H-index: 6
(University of the West of England)
Background On social media, images such as thinspiration, fitspiration, and bonespiration, are shared to inspire certain body ideals. Previous research has demonstrated that exposure to these groups of content is associated with increased body dissatisfaction and decreased self-esteem. It is therefore important that the bodies featured within these groups of content are more fully understood so that effective interventions and preventative measures can be informed, developed, and implemented.
Published on Nov 1, 2017in Clinical Psychology Review 9.90
Stuart B. Murray19
Estimated H-index: 19
(UCSF: University of California, San Francisco),
Jason M. Nagata13
Estimated H-index: 13
(UCSF: University of California, San Francisco)
+ 5 AuthorsJonathan Mond42
Estimated H-index: 42
(RMIT: RMIT University)
Historically, male presentations of eating disorders (EDs) have been perceived as rare and atypical - a perception that has resulted in the systematic underrepresentation of males in ED research. This underrepresentation has profoundly impacted clinical practice with male patients, in which i) stigmatization and treatment non-engagement are more likely, ii) a distinct array of medical complexities are faced, and iii) symptom presentations differ markedly from female presentations. Further, the m...
Cited By1
Newest
Published on Sep 1, 2019in Body Image 3.12
Scott Griffiths14
Estimated H-index: 14
(University of Melbourne),
Ashleigh Stefanovski (University of Melbourne)
Abstract We used experience sampling to examine thinspiration and fitspiration in the everyday lives of women and men. Undergraduates ( N = 108, 21% men) completed a 1-week smartphone-facilitated experience sampling protocol containing self-report measures of thinspiration and fitspiration exposure, body satisfaction, and affective functioning. Multi-level, gender-adjusted models examined the unique and interactive associations of exposure to thinspiration and fitspiration. Women reported a week...
Published on Apr 24, 2019in Frontiers in Psychology 2.13
Zdzisław Kroplewski , Małgorzata Szcześniak2
Estimated H-index: 2
+ 1 AuthorsAnita Gójska
The aim of the study was to measure whether people at increased risk for eating disorders (EDs) and people without an increased risk of eating disorders differ from each other in the assessment of family functioning (FF) and self-esteem (SE) dimensions. Moreover, the correlations between FF, EDs, and SE were verified, looking for the mediating role of SE in the context of the FF and EDs. The research was conducted on the group of 160 people aged from 18 to 47 years, including 74 people at increa...