Match!

Examining the relationship between pregnancy and quitting use of tobacco products in a U.S. national sample of women of reproductive age

Published on Dec 1, 2018in Preventive Medicine3.449
· DOI :10.1016/j.ypmed.2018.08.019
Allison N. Kurti14
Estimated H-index: 14
(UVM: University of Vermont),
Ryan Redner13
Estimated H-index: 13
(SIU: Southern Illinois University Carbondale)
+ 14 AuthorsStephen T. Higgins61
Estimated H-index: 61
(UVM: University of Vermont)
Abstract
Abstract This study examined quit rates longitudinally for cigarettes, e-cigarettes, hookah, cigars, and all tobacco products in a U.S. national sample of women aged 18–44 who completed both Wave 1 (W1) and Wave 2 (W2) of the Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health (PATH, 2013–2014, 2014–2015) study ( N  = 7814). Quit rates were examined among women who transitioned into pregnancy across survey waves, and among a comparable sample of non-pregnant women to provide contextual information about quitting among the broader population of reproductive-aged women. Multiple logistic regression modeling was used to estimate the associations of pregnancy and quitting adjusting for other demographic and psychosocial characteristics. Quit rates among women who were pregnant in W2 were highest for hookah (98.3%), followed by cigars (88.0%), e-cigarettes (81.3%), and lowest for tobacco cigarettes (53.4%). Slightly more than half (58.7%) of women reported quitting use all tobacco products while pregnant. Pregnancy was independently associated with increased odds of quitting hookah (AOR = 52.9, 95%CI = 3.4, 830.2), e-cigarettes (AOR = 21.0, 95%CI = 2.6, 170.3), all tobacco products (AOR = 9.6, 95%CI = 6.4, 14.5), and cigarettes (AOR = 6.5, 95%CI = 4.2, 10.1), although not cigars. Relative to other demographic and psychosocial characteristics, pregnancy was the strongest predictor of quitting use of each tobacco product. While these data indicate that pregnancy has strong, independent associations with quitting a variety of commercially available tobacco products, the comparatively lower quit rates for cigarettes versus other tobacco products underscores the long-standing need for more intensive, multipronged clinical and regulatory interventions to reduce cigarette use among reproductive-aged women.
  • References (46)
  • Citations (1)
📖 Papers frequently viewed together
7 Citations
4 Citations
78% of Scinapse members use related papers. After signing in, all features are FREE.
References46
Newest
#1Alexa A. Lopez (UVM: University of Vermont)H-Index: 13
#2Ryan Redner (SIU: Southern Illinois University Carbondale)H-Index: 13
Last. Stephen T. Higgins (UVM: University of Vermont)H-Index: 61
view all 12 authors...
7 CitationsSource
#1Allison N. Kurti (UVM: University of Vermont)H-Index: 14
#2Janice Y. Bunn (UVM: University of Vermont)H-Index: 27
Last. Stephen T. Higgins (UVM: University of Vermont)H-Index: 61
view all 14 authors...
Introduction:Understanding patterns of single and multiple tobacco product use among reproductive-aged women is critical given the potential for adverse health effects on mother and infant should a woman become pregnant. Methods:Patterns of tobacco use over a 2-year period were examined among all women (18-44 years) who completed wave 1 (W1) and wave 2 (W2) of the US Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health (PATH, 2013-2014, 2014-2015) Study. We examined the most common patterns of single and...
3 CitationsSource
#1Yvette van der Eijk (UCSF: University of California, San Francisco)H-Index: 4
#2Anne Berit Petersen (LLU: Loma Linda University)H-Index: 6
Last. Stella Aguinaga Bialous (UCSF: University of California, San Francisco)H-Index: 22
view all 3 authors...
The health risks associated with e-cigarette use in pregnancy are mostly unknown. Guidelines by the World Health Organization and national health agencies warn women against using e-cigarettes in pregnancy; however, in the UK, a recent multiagency guideline takes a different approach by not discouraging e-cigarette use in pregnancy. Furthermore, e-Voke™ , an e-cigarette, has been approved for use in pregnancy in the UK. We analyze United Nations human rights treaties to examine how they might in...
1 CitationsSource
#1Allison N. Kurti (UVM: University of Vermont)H-Index: 14
#2Ryan Redner (SIU: Southern Illinois University Carbondale)H-Index: 13
Last. Stephen T. Higgins (UVM: University of Vermont)H-Index: 61
view all 13 authors...
Abstract Monitoring use of tobacco products among pregnant women is a public health priority, yet few studies in U.S. national samples have been reported on this topic. We examined prevalence and correlates of using cigarettes, e-cigarettes, and other tobacco/nicotine delivery products in a U.S. national sample of pregnant women. Data were obtained from all pregnant women (≥ 18 years) in the first wave of the Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health (PATH, 2013–2014) Study ( N = 388). Prevale...
32 CitationsSource
2 CitationsSource
#1Stephen T. Higgins (UVM: University of Vermont)H-Index: 61
#2Sarah H. Heil (UVM: University of Vermont)H-Index: 35
Last. Lauren Tursi (UVM: University of Vermont)H-Index: 2
view all 18 authors...
Importance A national policy is under consideration to reduce the nicotine content of cigarettes to lower nicotine addiction potential in the United States. Objective To examine how smokers with psychiatric disorders and other vulnerabilities to tobacco addiction respond to cigarettes with reduced nicotine content. Design, Setting, and Participants A multisite, double-blind, within-participant assessment of acute response to research cigarettes with nicotine content ranging from levels below a h...
27 CitationsSource
#1David R. Strong (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 44
#2Jennifer L. PearsonH-Index: 23
Last. Raymond NiauraH-Index: 83
view all 16 authors...
Abstract Background and aims With no established standard for assessing tobacco dependence (TD) across tobacco products in surveys, the Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health (PATH) Study provides a unique platform for examining the psychometric properties and validity of multiple indicators of tobacco dependence across a range of tobacco products. Participants A U.S. nationally representative sample from the 32,320 adult Wave 1 interviews with analyses focused on 14,287 respondents who wer...
18 CitationsSource
#1Andrew Hyland (Roswell Park Cancer Institute)H-Index: 57
#2Bridget K. Ambrose (FDA: Food and Drug Administration)H-Index: 20
Last. Wilson M. Compton (NIH: National Institutes of Health)H-Index: 51
view all 41 authors...
Background This paper describes the methods and conceptual framework for Wave 1 of the Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health (PATH) Study data collection. The National Institutes of Health, through the National Institute on Drug Abuse, is partnering with the Food and Drug Administration9s (FDA) Center for Tobacco Products to conduct the PATH Study under a contract with Westat. Methods The PATH Study is a nationally representative, longitudinal cohort study of 45 971 adults and youth in the...
158 CitationsSource
#1Taneisha S. Scheuermann (KU: University of Kansas)H-Index: 8
#2Kimber P. Richter (KU: University of Kansas)H-Index: 21
Last. Theresa I. Shireman (Brown University)H-Index: 22
view all 4 authors...
Policies to promote smoking cessation among Medicaid-insured pregnant women have the potential to assist a significant proportion of pregnant smokers. In 2010, Kansas Medicaid began covering smoking cessation counseling for pregnant smokers. Our aim was to evaluate the use of smoking cessation benefits provided to pregnant women as a result of the Kansas Medicaid policy change that provided reimbursement for physician-provided smoking cessation counseling.We examined Kansas Medicaid claims data ...
4 CitationsSource
#1Cheryl Oncken (UConn: University of Connecticut)H-Index: 36
#2Karen A. Ricci (AN: RAND Corporation)H-Index: 8
Last. Heather Z. Sankey (Baystate Medical Center)H-Index: 9
view all 6 authors...
27 CitationsSource
Cited By1
Newest
#1Allison N. Kurti (UVM: University of Vermont)H-Index: 14
#2Janice Y. Bunn (UVM: University of Vermont)H-Index: 27
Last. Stephen T. Higgins (UVM: University of Vermont)H-Index: 61
view all 8 authors...
Abstract Background Identifying predictors of tobacco use patterns that differ in harm among reproductive-aged women may inform efforts to protect women and children against adverse health impacts of tobacco use. Methods Changes in tobacco use patterns were examined among women (18-49 years) who completed Wave 1 (W1) and Wave 2 (W2), or W2 and Wave 3 (W3) of the U.S. Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health (PATH, 2013-2016) study, and were using cigarettes, filtered cigars and/or cigarillos ...
Source
#1Stephen T. Higgins (UVM: University of Vermont)H-Index: 61
#2Allison N. Kurti (UVM: University of Vermont)H-Index: 14
Last. Cassandra A. Stanton (Westat)H-Index: 24
view all 10 authors...
Abstract In 2013 the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and National Institutes of Health established fourteen Tobacco Centers of Regulatory Science (TCORS) to advance scientific knowledge relevant to conducting evidence-based tobacco regulation. This report reviews TCORS-funded research with adult vulnerable populations. The literature search included a list of all TCORS-funded publications compiled by the TCORS coordinating center; all TCORS were requested to share publications not in the coord...
2 CitationsSource