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Are differences in variation and allometry in testicular size of two sibling species of the genus Mus (Mammalia, Rodentia) caused by female promiscuity?

Published on Jan 1, 2019
· DOI :10.1007/s13364-018-0393-x
Alexander Csanády1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Prešov),
Michal Stanko26
Estimated H-index: 26
,
Ladislav Mošanský7
Estimated H-index: 7
Cite
Abstract
Body and testes size can significantly affect male reproductive success under pre- and post-copulatory sexual selection. Testicular relative mass and/or volume are often used as a characteristic of sperm competitive ability in a comparison of phylogenetically close mammal species. Mus spicilegus males have the largest testes relative to body mass of any Mus species, which is often an indicator of high sperm competition. These findings suggest that these mound-building mice are probably not strictly monogamous. Here, we show the quantitative characteristics of testicular size, variation, and allometry of two sibling species with a different social and mating system, the house mouse (Mus musculus) and the mound-building mouse (M. spicilegus) from the Western Carpathian (Slovakia). We investigated whether testicular size (testicular length/width) was correlated with the head-and-body length and body weight, which are not involved in reproduction. Our results confirmed higher testicular values in M. spicilegus than in M. musculus. Similarly, the high phenotypic variance and positive allometry in testicular growth confirmed the suggestion that males with larger testes and a higher production of testosterone may be more competitive and more successful in post-copulatory selection.
  • References (56)
  • Citations (1)
Cite
References56
Newest
Published on Mar 1, 2017in Mammalian Biology1.64
Emiliano Mori12
Estimated H-index: 12
(UNISI: University of Siena),
Angela Iacucci1
Estimated H-index: 1
(CDU: Charles Darwin University)
+ 1 AuthorsLuca Santini15
Estimated H-index: 15
(Radboud University Nijmegen)
Abstract Sexual dimorphism is a common trait in many mammal species and sexual-size dimorphism (SSD) represents its commonest form. Rattus rattus and Rattus norvegicus are two cosmopolitan, polygynous species, for which a male-biased SSD has been anecdotally reported, but never quantified. In this work, we assessed the occurrence of SSD in both species and we tested the hypothesis that R. norvegicus has a more evident SSD than R. rattus , in agreement with their body mass-testes size ratio, intr...
Published on Oct 2, 2015in Zoology and ecology
Laima Balčiauskienė7
Estimated H-index: 7
,
Linas Balčiauskas8
Estimated H-index: 8
+ 1 AuthorsSigitas Podėnas1
Estimated H-index: 1
In 2012–2014, seven species of small mammals were trapped indoor in East and Central Lithuania, Mus musculus, and Apodemus flavicollis dominating. Population sex and age structure, reproductive aspects, body condition, and morphometry of these species are analyzed in this paper. In the dominant species, the sex ratio did not differed from 1:1. Indoor breeding was analyzed in M. musculus (average litter size 5.9 ± 0.6, min. 2, max. 13 juveniles) and A. flavicollis (3.7 ± 0.7, 2–6 juveniles). No s...
Published on Jan 1, 2014in Biologia0.73
Alexander Čanády4
Estimated H-index: 4
,
Ladislav Mošanský2
Estimated H-index: 2
,
Lucia Uličná1
Estimated H-index: 1
Results of morphometric analysis of the mound-building mouse (Mus spicilegus) evaluated in this study originate from field trapping in the eastern part of Slovakia during the years 2003–2008. Twenty-four cranial and dental variables and the zygomatic index (A/B) of 80 skulls (43 males, 37 females) were measured and evaluated with respect to the sex of the mice. Despite the fact that the overlap of skull measurements in adult males and females was high, sexual dimorphism was confirmed for several...
Published on Jan 1, 2014in Evolution3.57
Leigh W. Simmons75
Estimated H-index: 75
(UWA: University of Western Australia),
Renée C. Firman17
Estimated H-index: 17
(UWA: University of Western Australia)
Male genitalia exhibit a taxonomically widespread pattern of rapid and divergent evolution. Sexual selection is generally believed to be responsible for these patterns of evolutionary divergence, although empirical support for the sexual selection hypothesis comes mainly from studies of insects. Here we show that sexual selection is responsible for an evolutionary divergence in baculum morphology among populations of house mice Mus domesticus. We sourced mice from three isolated populations know...
Published on Dec 1, 2013in BMC Biology6.72
Paula Stockley39
Estimated H-index: 39
(University of Liverpool),
Steven A. Ramm18
Estimated H-index: 18
(Bielefeld University)
+ 3 AuthorsJane L. Hurst47
Estimated H-index: 47
(University of Liverpool)
Background: Diversity in penile morphology is characterised by extraordinary variation in the size and shape of the baculum (penis bone) found in many mammals. Although functionally enigmatic, diversity in baculum form is hypothesised to result from sexual selection. According to this hypothesis, the baculum should influence the outcome of reproductive competition among males within promiscuous mating systems. However, a test of this key prediction is currently lacking. Results: Here we show tha...
Published on Feb 1, 2013in Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology2.10
Zita Groó3
Estimated H-index: 3
(ELTE: Eötvös Loránd University),
Péter Szenczi6
Estimated H-index: 6
(ELTE: Eötvös Loránd University)
+ 1 AuthorsVilmos Altbäcker16
Estimated H-index: 16
(ELTE: Eötvös Loránd University)
We compared the natal dispersal behaviour of two mice species under laboratory conditions. Natal dispersal is a movement of an animal from its birthplace to its breeding area. This behaviour is known to be influenced by the mating system. In polygamous species, males are more likely to disperse, while in most of the monogamous species, both sexes disperse. Our subjects, the house mouse (Mus musculus) and the mound-building mouse (Mus spicilegus) are two sympatric species of the genus Mus. Both a...
Published on Jan 1, 2012in Journal of Animal Ecology4.36
Brian T. Preston15
Estimated H-index: 15
(Lancaster University),
Ian R. Stevenson14
Estimated H-index: 14
+ 3 AuthorsKenneth Wilson39
Estimated H-index: 39
(Lancaster University)
Summary 1. Testosterone (T) is a key mediator in the expression of numerous morphological and behavioural traits in mammals, but the factors underlying individual variation in circulating T levels are poorly understood. 2. The intimate structural integration of sperm and T production within the testes, alongside the dependency of sperm production on high levels of T, suggests that T requirements for spermatogenesis could be an important driver of individual differences in T. 3. To test this hypo...
Published on Jan 1, 2012in Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology2.10
Jean-François Lemaître16
Estimated H-index: 16
(UCBL: Claude Bernard University Lyon 1),
Steven A. Ramm18
Estimated H-index: 18
(University of Basel)
+ 1 AuthorsPaula Stockley39
Estimated H-index: 39
(University of Liverpool)
Since genital morphology can influence the outcome of post-copulatory sexual selection, differences in the genitalia of dominant and subordinate males could be a factor contributing to the fertilisation advantage of dominant males under sperm competition. Here we investigate for the first time if penile morphology differs according to male social status in a promiscuous mammal, the bank vole (Myodes glareolus). In this species, dominant males typically achieve higher reproductive success than su...
Published on Dec 1, 2011in Biological Journal of The Linnean Society2.20
Albrecht I. Schulte-Hostedde25
Estimated H-index: 25
(Laurentian University),
Jeff Bowman30
Estimated H-index: 30
(Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources),
Kevin R. Middel8
Estimated H-index: 8
(Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources)
Genitalia are among the most variable of morphological traits, and recent research suggests that this variability may be the result of sexual selection. For example, large bacula may undergo post-copulatory selection by females as a signal of male size and age. This should lead to positive allometry in baculum size. In addition to hyperallometry, sexually selected traits that undergo strong directional selection should exhibit high phenotypic variation. Nonetheless, in species in which pre-copul...
Cited By1
Newest
Published on Sep 4, 2019in Biologia0.73
Alexander Csanády1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Prešov),
Michal Stanko26
Estimated H-index: 26
,
Ladislav Mošanský7
Estimated H-index: 7
Outdoor species Mus spicilegus Petenyi, 1882 were trapped in 2004–2006 on fields of eastern Slovakia in vicinity of village Kechnec (48°33′7.2′′ N, 21°14′25.0′′ E; 200 m a.s.l.). Spring-summer population demography and reproductive aspects (in period March – June) were analyzed in this study. Totally, 51 individuals of the outdoor mound-building mice were trapped. The sex ratio was in favor of males (χ2 = 1.96, df = 1, p > 0.05). Prevalence of adult mice was significantly higher than of subadult...
Published on Jun 1, 2019in Zoomorphology1.14
Alexander Csanády1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Prešov),
Silva Duranková (University of Prešov), Erika Labancová
Great genital variation occurs across animal species, likely reflecting the operation of sexual selection. We quantified bacular, testicular, and vesicular size, variation, and allometry in house mice (Laurentii in: Mus musculus Linnaeus, Systema naturae 10th ed, Salvii, Stockholm, 1758) from the western Carpathians (Slovakia). We investigated whether baculum size is related to size of reproductive organs (testicular length and width, and vesicular length), and with body size (head-and-body leng...