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Cohort Profile: The New South Wales Child Development Study (NSW-CDS)—Wave 2 (child age 13 years)

Published on Oct 1, 2018in International Journal of Epidemiology7.339
· DOI :10.1093/ije/dyy115
Melissa J. Green38
Estimated H-index: 38
(UNSW: University of New South Wales),
Felicity Harris7
Estimated H-index: 7
(UNSW: University of New South Wales)
+ 14 AuthorsVaughan J. Carr59
Estimated H-index: 59
(UNSW: University of New South Wales)
Sources
Abstract
The New South Wales Child Development Study (NSW-CDS) was established to enable a life course epidemiological approach to identifying risk and protective factors for childhood and adolescent-onset mental health problems, and other adverse outcomes (e.g. educational underachievement, welfare dependence, criminality). The study methodology entails repeated waves of record linkage for a population of Australian children in the state of NSW, funded by competitive funding awards (see Funding), and conducted in partnership with multiple NSW government departments. Table 1 summarizes the study phases (waves of record linkage) and measurements...
  • References (19)
  • Citations (8)
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References19
Newest
#1Melissa J. Green (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 38
#2Stacy Tzoumakis (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 9
Last. Vaughan J. Carr (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 59
view all 11 authors...
This study examined associations between maltreatment and early developmental vulnerabilities in a population sample of 68,459 children (Mage = 5.62 years, SD = .37) drawn from the Australian state of New South Wales, using linked administrative data for the children and their parents (collected 2001–2009). Associations were estimated between (a) any maltreatment, (b) the number of maltreatment types, and (c) the timing of first reported maltreatment and vulnerability and risk status on multiple...
7 CitationsSource
#1Melissa J. Green (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 38
#2Maina Kariuki (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 6
Last. Vaughan J. Carr (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 59
view all 7 authors...
Background: Fetal exposure to infectious and noninfectious diseases may influence early childhood developmental functioning, on the path to later mental illness. Here, we investigated the effects of in utero exposure to maternal infection and noninfectious diseases during pregnancy on offspring developmental vulnerabilities at age 5 years, in the context of estimated effects for early childhood exposures to infectious and noninfectious diseases and maternal mental illness. Methods: We used popul...
2 CitationsSource
#1Melissa J. Green (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 38
#2Stacy Tzoumakis (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 9
Last. Vaughan J. Carr (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 59
view all 10 authors...
Objective:Detecting the early emergence of childhood risk for adult mental disorders may lead to interventions for reducing subsequent burden of these disorders. We set out to determine classes of children who may be at risk for later mental disorder on the basis of early patterns of development in a population cohort, and associated exposures gleaned from linked administrative records obtained within the New South Wales Child Development Study.Methods:Intergenerational records from government d...
4 CitationsSource
#1Kimberlie Dean (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 25
#2Melissa J. Green (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 38
Last. Vaughan J. Carr (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 59
view all 8 authors...
Background The intergenerational risk for mental illness is well established within diagnostic categories, but the risk is unlikely to respect diagnostic boundaries and may be reflected more broadly in early life vulnerabilities. We aimed to establish patterns of association between externalising and internalising vulnerabilities in early childhood and parental mental disorder across the full spectrum of diagnoses.Methods A cohort of Australian children (n = 69 116) entering the first year of sc...
2 CitationsSource
#1Sandra L. Matheson (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 14
#2Maina Kariuki (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 6
Last. Kristin R. Laurens (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 33
view all 12 authors...
Aims. Childhood maltreatment and a family history of a schizophrenia spectrum disorder (SSD) are each associated with social-emotional dysfunction in childhood. Both are also strong risk factors for adult SSDs, and social-emotional dysfunction in childhood may be an antecedent of these disorders. We used data from a large Australian population cohort to determine the independent and moderating effects of maltreatment and parental SSDs on early childhood social-emotional functioning. Methods. The...
6 CitationsSource
#1Kristin R. LaurensH-Index: 33
#2Stacy Tzoumakis (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 9
Last. Melissa J. Green (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 38
view all 13 authors...
Purpose The Middle Childhood Survey (MCS) was designed as a computerised self-report assessment of children’s mental health and well-being at approximately 11 years of age, conducted with a population cohort of 87 026 children being studied longitudinally within the New South Wales (NSW) Child Development Study. Participants School Principals provided written consent for teachers to administer the MCS in class to year 6 students at 829 NSW schools (35.0% of eligible schools). Parent or child opt...
11 CitationsSource
#1Kristin R. Laurens (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 33
#2Stacy Tzoumakis (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 9
Last. Kimberlie DeanH-Index: 25
view all 8 authors...
Background : Parental criminal offending is an established risk factor for offending among offspring, but little evidence is available indicating the impact of offending on early childhood functioning. We used data from a large Australian population cohort to determine associations between exposure to parental offending and a range of developmental outcomes at age 5 years. Method: Multi-generation data in 66 477 children and their parents from the New South Wales Child Development Study were com...
7 CitationsSource
#1Stacy Tzoumakis (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 9
#2Kimberlie Dean (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 25
Last. Kristin R. Laurens (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 33
view all 8 authors...
Purpose To examine the impact of parental criminal offending, both paternal and maternal, on offspring aggression at age 5 years, while also considering key risk factors, including parental mental illness, child’s sex, and socioeconomic disadvantage.
6 CitationsSource
#1Maina Kariuki (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 6
#2Alessandra Raudino (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 9
Last. Vaughan J. Carr (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 59
view all 11 authors...
Aim Childhood infectious diseases can be associated with later physical and psychological ill health, and the effects of this association may be evident during early childhood development. This study aimed to examine the effects of hospitalisation for early life infection on early childhood development. Methods Hospital admission data for infection were obtained from the New South Wales Ministry of Health Admitted Patient Data Collection for 87 026 children, for whom the Australian Early Develop...
7 CitationsSource
#1Vaughan J. Carr (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 59
#2Felicity Harris (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 7
Last. Melissa J. Green (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 38
view all 16 authors...
Purpose The initial aim of this multiagency, multigenerational record linkage study is to identify childhood profiles of developmental vulnerability and resilience, and to identify the determinants of these profiles. The eventual aim is to identify risk and protective factors for later childhood-onset and adolescent-onset mental health problems, and other adverse social outcomes, using subsequent waves of record linkage. The research will assist in informing the development of public policy and ...
23 CitationsSource
Cited By8
Newest
#1Stacy Tzoumakis (Griffith University)H-Index: 9
#2Tyson Whitten (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 1
Last. Melissa J. Green (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 38
view all 8 authors...
Source
#1Kristin R. Laurens (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 33
#2Fahkrul Islam (UNSW: University of New South Wales)
Last. Vaughan J. Carr (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 59
view all 11 authors...
Abstract Background Maltreated children are at risk of poor educational outcomes, but also experience greater individual, family, and neighbourhood adversities that may obscure an understanding of relationships between child protection involvement and educational attainment. Objective To examine associations between child protection involvement and 3rd- and 5th-grade reading and numeracy attainment, while controlling multiple other adversities. Participants and Setting Participants were 56,860 A...
Source
#1Patrycja J. Piotrowska (NeuRA: Neuroscience Research Australia)
#2Tyson Whitten (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 1
Last. Melissa J. Green (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 38
view all 8 authors...
Adult psychosocial difficulties, including psychiatric disorders, are often preceded by childhood psychosocial vulnerabilities, presenting critical windows of opportunity for preventative intervention. The present study aimed to identify longitudinal patterns (representing transitions between profiles) of childhood socio-emotional and cognitive vulnerability in the general population from early to middle childhood, in relation to key risk factors (e.g. parental mental illness and offending). Dat...
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#1Amanda L. Neil (UTAS: University of Tasmania)H-Index: 14
#2Fakhrul Islam (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 40
Last. Melissa J. Green (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 38
view all 8 authors...
Abstract Background Longitudinal data on health costs associated with physical and mental conditions are not available for children reported to child protection services. Objective To estimate the costs of hospitalization for physical and mental health conditions by child protection status, including out-of-home-care (OOHC) placement, from birth until 13-years, and to assess the excess costs associated with child protection contact over this period. Participants and setting Australian population...
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#1Kristin R. Laurens (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 33
#2Melissa J. Green (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 38
Last. Vaughan J. Carr (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 59
view all 10 authors...
OBJECTIVE: This study examined associations between chronic physical health conditions (identified from hospital records) that are subject to school health care plans, and children's emotional, behavioral, and social functioning during early (∼5 years of age) and middle childhood (∼11 years). METHODS: Participants were 21,304 Australian children from a representative longitudinal population cohort derived by multi-agency record linkage. Hospital presentations (admitted patients and emergency dep...
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#1Tyson Whitten (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 1
#2Melissa J. Green (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 38
Last. Kimberlie Dean (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 25
view all 7 authors...
Objectives Children whose parents have a history of criminal offending may be at risk of higher rates of emergency department (ED) presentation, along with other adverse health outcomes. We used data from a large, population-based record linkage project to examine the association between maternal and paternal criminal offending and the incidence of ED presentations among child offspring. Methods Data for 72 772 children with linked parental records were drawn from the New South Wales Child Devel...
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#1Tyson Whitten (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 1
#2Kristin R. Laurens (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 33
Last. Kimberlie Dean (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 25
view all 8 authors...
Purpose Although parental criminal offending is a recognized risk factor for conduct problems among offspring, its impact on the continuity and discontinuity of children’s behavioural and emotional difficulties during the early development is less well known. We used data from a large, population-based record-linkage project to examine the relationship between parental offending and the continuity and discontinuity of children’s conduct, attentional, and emotional difficulties from early to midd...
Source
#1Kristin R. Laurens (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 33
#2Stacy Tzoumakis (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 9
Last. Melissa J. Green (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 38
view all 6 authors...
The British Psychological Society Objectives: Childhood psychotic-like experiences (PLEs) increase risk for concurrent and future psychiatric disorders but are common in the population. Strategies are needed to identify vulnerable individuals who may benefit from monitoring or targeted intervention. This study aimed to delineate profiles of childhood PLEs that might be differentially associated with other psychopathologies, and multiple psychopathology. Design: Cross-sectional, online self-repor...
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#1Melissa J. Green (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 38
#2Maina Kariuki (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 6
Last. Vaughan J. Carr (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 59
view all 10 authors...
Abstract Background Cross-agency administrative data can improve cost-effective triage systems for child protection and other human service delivery. Objective To determine the minimum set of cross-agency indicators that could accurately classify placement in out-of-home-care (OOHC) before age 13–14 years. Participants and setting Participants were 72,079 Australian children (mean age = 13.16 years; SD = 0.37; 51.4% male) and their parents, for whom linked administrative records spanning the yea...
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#1Larissa Rossen (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 5
#2Stacy Tzoumakis (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 9
Last. Melissa J. Green (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 38
view all 9 authors...
Abstract Background Childhood maltreatment is associated with early childhood developmental vulnerabilities. However, the extent to which higher levels of child protection responses confer benefit to developmental competencies, and the impact of earlier timing of first reports in relation to early childhood vulnerability remains unclear. Objective We examined associations between early developmental vulnerabilities and (1) the highest level of child protection response (where OOHC was deemed the...
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