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Relative fat mass (RFM) as a new estimator of whole-body fat percentage ─ A cross-sectional study in American adult individuals

Published on Dec 1, 2018in Scientific Reports4.01
· DOI :10.1038/s41598-018-29362-1
Orison O. Woolcott9
Estimated H-index: 9
(Cedars-Sinai Medical Center),
Richard N. Bergman103
Estimated H-index: 103
(Cedars-Sinai Medical Center)
Cite
Abstract
High whole-body fat percentage is independently associated with increased mortality. We aimed to identify a simple anthropometric linear equation that is more accurate than the body mass index (BMI) to estimate whole-body fat percentage among adult individuals. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 1999–2004 data (n = 12,581) were used for model development and NHANES 2005–2006 data (n = 3,456) were used for model validation. From the 365 anthropometric indices generated, the final selected equation was as follows: 64 − (20 × height/waist circumference) + (12 × sex), named as the relative fat mass (RFM); sex = 0 for men and 1 for women. In the validation dataset, compared with BMI, RFM better predicted whole-body fat percentage, measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), among women and men. RFM showed better accuracy than the BMI and had fewer false negative cases of body fat-defined obesity among women and men. RFM reduced total obesity misclassification among all women and all men and, overall, among Mexican-Americans, European-Americans and African-Americans. In the population studied, the suggested RFM was more accurate than BMI to estimate whole-body fat percentage among women and men and improved body fat-defined obesity misclassification among American adult individuals of Mexican, European or African ethnicity.
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References49
Newest
Published on Nov 14, 2017in BMJ27.60
Chenhan Ma1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Aberd.: University of Aberdeen),
Alison Avenell52
Estimated H-index: 52
(Aberd.: University of Aberdeen)
+ 6 AuthorsGraeme MacLennan45
Estimated H-index: 45
(Aberd.: University of Aberdeen)
Objective To assess whether weight loss interventions for adults with obesity affect all cause, cardiovascular, and cancer mortality, cardiovascular disease, cancer, and body weight. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) using random effects, estimating risk ratios, and mean differences. Heterogeneity investigated using Cochran’s Q and I 2 statistics. Quality of evidence assessed by GRADE criteria. Data sources Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Central Reg...
Published on Jul 18, 2017in JAMA51.27
Yang Zheng22
Estimated H-index: 22
(Fudan University),
JoAnn E. Manson232
Estimated H-index: 232
(Harvard University)
+ 5 AuthorsFrank B. Hu202
Estimated H-index: 202
(Harvard University)
Importance Data describing the effects of weight gain across adulthood on overall health are important for weight control. Objective To examine the association of weight gain from early to middle adulthood with health outcomes later in life. Design, Setting, and Participants Cohort analysis of US women from the Nurses’ Health Study (1976-June 30, 2012) and US men from the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study (1986-January 31, 2012) who recalled weight during early adulthood (at age of 18 years i...
Published on Dec 9, 2016
C. Snehalatha44
Estimated H-index: 44
,
Arun Nanditha10
Estimated H-index: 10
Published on Aug 25, 2016in The New England Journal of Medicine70.67
Béatrice Lauby-Secretan14
Estimated H-index: 14
,
Chiara Scoccianti17
Estimated H-index: 17
+ 3 AuthorsKurt Straif60
Estimated H-index: 60
The International Agency for Research on Cancer convened a workshop on the relationship between body fatness and cancer, from which an IARC handbook on the topic will appear. An executive summary of the evidence is presented.
Published on May 1, 2016in International Journal of Obesity4.51
John A. Batsis26
Estimated H-index: 26
,
Todd A. MacKenzie33
Estimated H-index: 33
(Dartmouth College)
+ 3 AuthorsFrancisco Lopez-Jimenez51
Estimated H-index: 51
Diagnostic accuracy of body mass index to identify obesity in older adults: NHANES 1999–2004
Published on Apr 1, 2016
Francisco B. Ortega64
Estimated H-index: 64
(KI: Karolinska Institutet),
Xuemei Sui47
Estimated H-index: 47
(USC: University of South Carolina)
+ 1 AuthorsSteven N. Blair140
Estimated H-index: 140
(USC: University of South Carolina)
Abstract Objectives To examine whether an accurate measure (using a criterion standard method) of total body fat would be a better predictor of cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality than body mass index (BMI). Participants and Methods A total of 60,335 participants were examined between January 1, 1979, and December 31, 2003, and then followed-up for a mean follow-up period of 15.2 years. Body mass index was estimated using standard procedures. Body composition indices (ie, body fat percentage ...
Published on Apr 1, 2016in International Journal of Obesity4.51
June Stevens65
Estimated H-index: 65
(UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill),
Fang-Shu Ou1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)
+ 2 AuthorsKimberly P. Truesdale15
Estimated H-index: 15
(UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)
Published on Mar 8, 2016in Annals of Internal Medicine19.32
Raj Padwal44
Estimated H-index: 44
(U of A: University of Alberta),
William D. Leslie2
Estimated H-index: 2
(U of A: University of Alberta)
+ 1 AuthorsSumit R. Majumdar69
Estimated H-index: 69
(U of A: University of Alberta)
Prior mortality studies have concluded that elevated body mass index (BMI) may improve survival. These studies were limited because they did not measure adiposity directly.To examine associations of BMI and body fat percentage (separately and together) with mortality.Observational study.Manitoba, Canada.Adults aged 40 years or older referred for bone mineral density (BMD) testing.Participants had dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA), entered a clinical BMD registry, and were followed using lin...
Published on Jul 1, 2014in Journal of the American College of Cardiology18.64
PulmonaryRehabilitation1
Estimated H-index: 1
The goals of the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Heart Association (AHA) are to prevent cardiovascular (CV) diseases, improve the management of people who have these diseases through professional education and research, and develop guidelines, standards and policies that promote optimal patient care and CV health. Toward these objectives, the ACC and AHA have collaborated with the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) and stakeholder and professional organizatio...
Published on Jun 24, 2014in Circulation23.05
David C. Goff75
Estimated H-index: 75
,
Donald M. Lloyd-Jones83
Estimated H-index: 83
+ 14 AuthorsChristopher J. O'Donnell129
Estimated H-index: 129
Preamble and Transition to ACC/AHA Guidelines to Reduce Cardiovascular Risk S50 The goals of the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Heart Association (AHA) are to prevent cardiovascular diseases (CVD); improve the management of people who have these diseases through professional education and research; and develop guidelines, standards, and policies that promote optimal patient care and cardiovascular health. Toward these objectives, the ACC and AHA have collaborated with the ...
Cited By1
Newest
Published on Jul 9, 2019in Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging2.27
Michael R. Esco13
Estimated H-index: 13
(UA: University of Alabama),
Michael V. Fedewa8
Estimated H-index: 8
(UA: University of Alabama)
+ 6 AuthorsBailey A. Welborn2
Estimated H-index: 2
(UA: University of Alabama)
Published on Oct 18, 2018in European Journal of Clinical Nutrition3.11
Michael V. Fedewa8
Estimated H-index: 8
(UA: University of Alabama),
Angela R. Russell2
Estimated H-index: 2
(UA: University of Alabama)
+ 3 AuthorsMichael R. Esco13
Estimated H-index: 13
(UA: University of Alabama)
The body adiposity index (BAI) and relative fat mass (RFM) are anthropometric measures developed to estimate body composition (%Fat). There is limited research validating these methods of body composition assessment in adults with Down syndrome (DS). The aim of this study was to examine the accuracy of the BAI and RFM in a sample of adults with- and without DS. We hypothesize that the RFM would provide greater accuracy than the BAI when estimating %Fat. BAI and RFM were assessed in a sample of a...
Published on Apr 1, 2019in Journal of Clinical Densitometry2.18
Brett S. Nickerson5
Estimated H-index: 5
,
Brett S. Nickerson1
Estimated H-index: 1
(TAMIU: Texas A&M International University)
+ 1 AuthorsBrian Kliszczewicz5
Estimated H-index: 5
Abstract This study examined the agreement between 2 segmental bioimpedance analysis (BIA) devices, air displacement plethysmography (BOD POD), and dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) for estimating body composition in obese adults. Fifty obese adults (25 men and 25 women; age = 34.20 ± 11.19 years; BMI = 36.14 ± 5.33 kg/m 2 ) had their body fat percentage (BF%) and fat-free mass (FFM) evaluated with 2 segmental BIA devices (InBody 230 and InBody 720), BOD POD, and DXA (Lunar iDXA). Body comp...
View next paperPercentage of body fat cutoffs by sex, age, and race-ethnicity in the US adult population from NHANES 1999–2004