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Biodiversity across trophic levels drives multifunctionality in highly diverse forests

Published on Dec 1, 2018in Nature Communications11.88
· DOI :10.1038/s41467-018-05421-z
Andreas Schuldt17
Estimated H-index: 17
(MLU: Martin Luther University of Halle-Wittenberg),
Thorsten Assmann23
Estimated H-index: 23
(Lüneburg University)
+ 23 AuthorsHelge Bruelheide38
Estimated H-index: 38
(MLU: Martin Luther University of Halle-Wittenberg)
Cite
Abstract
Human-induced biodiversity change impairs ecosystem functions crucial to human well-being. However, the consequences of this change for ecosystem multifunctionality are poorly understood beyond effects of plant species loss, particularly in regions with high biodiversity across trophic levels. Here we adopt a multitrophic perspective to analyze how biodiversity affects multifunctionality in biodiverse subtropical forests. We consider 22 independent measurements of nine ecosystem functions central to energy and nutrient flow across trophic levels. We find that individual functions and multifunctionality are more strongly affected by the diversity of heterotrophs promoting decomposition and nutrient cycling, and by plant functional-trait diversity and composition, than by tree species richness. Moreover, cascading effects of higher trophic-level diversity on functions originating from lower trophic-level processes highlight that multitrophic biodiversity is key to understanding drivers of multifunctionality. A broader perspective on biodiversity-multifunctionality relationships is crucial for sustainable ecosystem management in light of non-random species loss and intensified biotic disturbances under future environmental change.
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  • References (68)
  • Citations (7)
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References68
Newest
Published on Jun 1, 2018in Ecography5.95
Julia Binkenstein6
Estimated H-index: 6
(University of Freiburg),
Alexandra-Maria Klein48
Estimated H-index: 48
+ 10 AuthorsTesfaye Wubet29
Estimated H-index: 29
Published on Jan 1, 2018in Ecology Letters8.70
Fons van der Plas11
Estimated H-index: 11
(University of Bern),
Sophia Ratcliffe13
Estimated H-index: 13
(Leipzig University)
+ 68 AuthorsLuc Barbaro19
Estimated H-index: 19
(INRA: Institut national de la recherche agronomique)
Additional co-authors: Damien Bonal, Olivier Bouriaud, Helge Bruelheide, Filippo Bussotti, Monique Carnol, Bastien Castagneyrol, Yohan Charbonnier, Johannes H. C. Cornelissen, Jonas Dahlgren, Ewa Checko, Andrea Coppi, Seid Muhie Dawud, Marc Deconchat, Pallieter De Smedt, Hans De Wandeler, Timo Domisch, Leena Finer, Mariangela Fotelli, Arthur Gessler, Andre Granier, Charlotte Grossiord, Virginie Guyot, Josephine Haase, Stephan Hattenschwiler, Herve Jactel, Bogdan Jaroszewicz, Tommaso Jucker, Step...
Published on Jan 1, 2018in Nature Ecology and Evolution
Sebastian T. Meyer23
Estimated H-index: 23
(TUM: Technische Universität München),
Robert Ptacnik22
Estimated H-index: 22
+ 21 AuthorsWolfgang W. Weisser58
Estimated H-index: 58
(TUM: Technische Universität München)
Biodiversity ensures ecosystem functioning and provisioning of ecosystem services, but it remains unclear how biodiversity–ecosystem multifunctionality relationships depend on the identity and number of functions considered. Here, we demonstrate that ecosystem multifunctionality, based on 82 indicator variables of ecosystem functions in a grassland biodiversity experiment, increases strongly with increasing biodiversity. Analysing subsets of functions showed that the effects of biodiversity on m...
Published on Jan 1, 2018in Ecology Letters8.70
Mayra C. Vidal3
Estimated H-index: 3
(DU: University of Denver),
Shannon M. Murphy12
Estimated H-index: 12
(DU: University of Denver)
Primary consumers are under strong selection from resource (‘bottom-up’) and consumer (‘top-down’) controls, but the relative importance of these selective forces is unknown. We performed a meta-analysis to compare the strength of top-down and bottom-up forces on consumer fitness, considering multiple predictors that can modulate these effects: diet breadth, feeding guild, habitat/environment, type of bottom-up effects, type of top-down effects and how consumer fitness effects are measured. We f...
Published on Jan 1, 2018in Ecology Letters8.70
Shaopeng Wang14
Estimated H-index: 14
(FSU: University of Jena),
Ulrich Brose10
Estimated H-index: 10
(FSU: University of Jena)
One challenge in merging community and ecosystem ecology is to integrate the complexity of natural multitrophic communities into concepts of ecosystem functioning. Here, we combine food-web and allometry theories to demonstrate that primary production, as measured by the total nutrient uptake of the multitrophic community, is determined by vertical diversity (i.e. food web's maximum trophic level) and structure (i.e. distributions of species and their abundances and metabolic rates across trophi...
Published on Dec 1, 2017in Scientific Reports4.01
Andreas Schuldt17
Estimated H-index: 17
(MLU: Martin Luther University of Halle-Wittenberg),
Helge Bruelheide38
Estimated H-index: 38
(MLU: Martin Luther University of Halle-Wittenberg)
+ 9 AuthorsChristian Wirth47
Estimated H-index: 47
(Leipzig University)
Ecosystem functioning and human well-being critically depend on numerous species interactions above- and belowground. However, unraveling the structure of multitrophic interaction webs at the ecosystem level is challenging for biodiverse ecosystems. Attempts to identify major relationships between trophic levels usually rely on simplified proxies, such as species diversity. Here, we propose to consider the full information on species composition across trophic levels, using Procrustes correlatio...
Published on Nov 1, 2017in Ecology Letters8.70
Sophia Ratcliffe13
Estimated H-index: 13
(Leipzig University),
Christian Wirth47
Estimated H-index: 47
(MPG: Max Planck Society)
+ 54 AuthorsBettina Ohse6
Estimated H-index: 6
(Leipzig University)
The importance of biodiversity in supporting ecosystem functioning is generally well accepted. However, most evidence comes from small-scale studies, and scaling-up patterns of biodiversity–ecosystem functioning (B-EF) remains challenging, in part because the importance of environmental factors in shaping B-EF relations is poorly understood. Using a forest research platform in which 26 ecosystem functions were measured along gradients of tree species richness in six regions across Europe, we inv...
Published on Jul 1, 2017in Nature Ecology and Evolution
Lars Gamfeldt9
Estimated H-index: 9
,
Fabian Roger6
Estimated H-index: 6
Biodiversity and ecosystem functioning relationships remain constant no matter how many functions are considered. Biodiversity affects the level of multifunctionality and the effect on multifunctionality equals the average effect on single functions.
Published on Jul 1, 2017in Ecology Letters8.70
Andreas Fichtner11
Estimated H-index: 11
,
Werner Härdtle30
Estimated H-index: 30
+ 3 AuthorsGoddert von Oheimb24
Estimated H-index: 24
(TUD: Dresden University of Technology)
Studies on tree communities have demonstrated that species diversity can enhance forest productivity, but the driving mechanisms at the local neighbourhood level remain poorly understood. Here, we use data from a large-scale biodiversity experiment with 24 subtropical tree species to show that neighbourhood tree species richness generally promotes individual tree productivity. We found that the underlying mechanisms depend on a focal tree's functional traits: For species with a conservative reso...
Published on May 19, 2017in Science41.04
Tomas Roslin32
Estimated H-index: 32
(UH: University of Helsinki),
Bess Hardwick6
Estimated H-index: 6
(UH: University of Helsinki)
+ 37 AuthorsTimothy C. Bonebrake15
Estimated H-index: 15
(HKU: University of Hong Kong)
Biotic interactions underlie ecosystem structure and function, but predicting interaction outcomes is difficult. We tested the hypothesis that biotic interaction strength increases toward the equator, using a global experiment with model caterpillars to measure predation risk. Across an 11,660-kilometer latitudinal gradient spanning six continents, we found increasing predation toward the equator, with a parallel pattern of increasing predation toward lower elevations. Patterns across both latit...
Cited By7
Newest
Published on Jan 3, 2019in Nature Communications11.88
Nico Eisenhauer42
Estimated H-index: 42
(Leipzig University),
Aletta Bonn26
Estimated H-index: 26
(FSU: University of Jena),
Carlos A. Guerra4
Estimated H-index: 4
(MLU: Martin Luther University of Halle-Wittenberg)
Invertebrates are central to the functioning of ecosystems, yet they are underappreciated and understudied. Recent work has shown that they are suffering from rapid decline. Here we call for a greater focus on invertebrates and make recommendations for future investigation.
Published on Dec 1, 2019in Scientific Reports4.01
Simon Tresch1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Research Institute of Organic Agriculture),
David Frey6
Estimated H-index: 6
(ETH Zurich)
+ 4 AuthorsMarco Moretti24
Estimated H-index: 24
Urban gardens are popular green spaces that have the potential to provide essential ecosystem services, support human well-being, and at the same time foster biodiversity in cities. We investigated the impact of gardening activities on five soil functions and the relationship between plant (600 spp.) and soil fauna (earthworms: 18 spp., springtails: 39 spp.) in 85 urban gardens (170 sites) across the city of Zurich (Switzerland). Our results suggest that high plant diversity in gardens had a pos...
Published on Sep 19, 2019in bioRxiv
Carlos A. Guerra (German Center for Integrative Biodiversity Research), Nico Eisenhauer42
Estimated H-index: 42
(Leipzig University)
Soils harbor a substantial fraction of the world9s biodiversity, contributing to many crucial ecosystem functions. It is thus essential to identify general macroecological patterns related to the distribution and functioning of soil organisms to support their conservation and governance. Here we identify and characterize the existing gaps in soil biodiversity and ecosystem function data across soil macroecological studies and >11,000 sampling sites. These include significant spatial, environment...
Published on 2019in Ecology Letters8.70
Romana Limberger5
Estimated H-index: 5
(University of Salzburg),
Alexandra Pitt (University of Salzburg)+ 1 AuthorsStephen A. Wickham16
Estimated H-index: 16
(University of Salzburg)
Published on May 1, 2019in Soil Biology & Biochemistry5.29
Wu Xiong7
Estimated H-index: 7
(NAU: Nanjing Agricultural University),
Rong Li1
Estimated H-index: 1
(NAU: Nanjing Agricultural University)
+ 6 AuthorsStefan Geisen16
Estimated H-index: 16
Abstract Plant-beneficial microbes improve while pathogens reduce plant performance. When introduced in soils, such microbes can induce entire microbiome changes. However, the impact of those microbial introductions on protists – key predators within the soil microbiome – remain unknown. Here, we tracked how soil protists respond to bacterial ( Bacillus and Ralstonia ) and fungal ( Trichoderma and Fusarium ) introductions, with both microbial groups represented by one beneficial and one pathogen...
Published on 2019in Diversity
Martin Weih37
Estimated H-index: 37
,
Carolyn Glynn10
Estimated H-index: 10
,
Christel Baum25
Estimated H-index: 25
Plantations of willow (Salix spp.) are today grown as short-rotation coppice (SRC) for the sustainable production of biomass. While developing these production systems in the past, much ecological knowledge on plant–plant, plant–environment and trophic interactions has been generated. This knowledge can contribute to the further development of biodiversity–ecosystem function (BEF) theory, which frequently lacks a sound understanding of the complex mechanisms behind the observed patterns of diver...
Published on Jun 9, 2019in Ecological Entomology2.07
Anna Knuff (University of Freiburg), Michael Staab11
Estimated H-index: 11
(University of Freiburg)
+ 2 AuthorsAlexandra-Maria Klein48
Estimated H-index: 48
(University of Freiburg)
Published on May 14, 2019in Ecology4.29
Lionel R. Hertzog6
Estimated H-index: 6
(UGent: Ghent University),
Roschong Boonyarittichaikij2
Estimated H-index: 2
(UGent: Ghent University)
+ 11 AuthorsDries Bonte33
Estimated H-index: 33
(UGent: Ghent University)
Published on Mar 1, 2019in iScience
Aaron M. Ellison56
Estimated H-index: 56
(Harvard University)
Summary Foundation species define ecosystems, control the biological diversity of associated species, modulate critical ecosystem processes, and often have important cultural values and resonance. This review summarizes current understanding of the characteristics and traits of foundation species and how to distinguish them from other "important" species in ecological systems (e.g., keystone, dominant, and core species); illustrates how analysis of the structure and function of ecological networ...
Published on Mar 1, 2019in Journal of Vegetation Science2.94
Helge Bruelheide38
Estimated H-index: 38
(MLU: Martin Luther University of Halle-Wittenberg),
Jürgen Dengler29
Estimated H-index: 29
(University of Bayreuth)
+ 173 AuthorsBrody Sandel6
Estimated H-index: 6
(Santa Clara University)
Aims Vegetation‐plot records provide information on the presence and cover or abundance of plants co‐occurring in the same community. Vegetation‐plot data are spread across research groups, environmental agencies and biodiversity research centers and, thus, are rarely accessible at continental or global scales. Here we present the sPlot database, which collates vegetation plots worldwide to allow for the exploration of global patterns in taxonomic, functional and phylogenetic diversity at the pl...
View next paperBiodiversity–multifunctionality relationships depend on identity and number of measured functions