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Real-life outcome of anti-tumor necrosis factor α in the ambulatory treatment of ulcerative colitis

Published on Mar 21, 2015in World Journal of Gastroenterology3.41
· DOI :10.3748/wjg.v21.i11.3282
Enayatullah Baki1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Philipp Zwickel2
Estimated H-index: 2
+ 4 AuthorsAnnika Gauss7
Estimated H-index: 7
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Abstract
AIM: To evaluate the outcome of anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha (anti-TNFα) therapy in outpatients with ulcerative colitis at a tertiary referral center. METHODS: All patients with a confirmed diagnosis of ulcerative colitis undergoing therapy with infliximab and/or adalimumab at the outpatient clinic for inflammatory bowel diseases at the University Hospital Heidelberg between January 2011 and February 2014 were retrospectively enrolled. Patients with a follow-up period of less than 6 mo from start of anti-TNFα therapy were excluded. Medical records of all eligible individuals were carefully reviewed. Steroid-free clinical remission of a duration of at least 3 mo, colectomy rate, duration of anti-TNFα therapy, need for anti-TNFα dose escalation, and the occurrence of adverse events were evaluated as the main outcome parameters. RESULTS: Seventy-two patients were included (35 treated with infliximab, 17 with adalimumab, 20 with both consecutively). Median follow-up was 27 mo (range: 6-87 mo). Steroid-free clinical remission was achieved by 22.2% of the patients (median duration: 21 mo until end of follow-up; range: 3-66 mo). Patients attaining steroid-free clinical remission displayed lower hemoglobin and albumin blood levels at the start of treatment than those who did not achieve remission. The overall colectomy rate was 20.8%. Nearly 50% of the patients underwent anti-TNFα dose escalation during the follow-up period. For both the infliximab and the adalimumab treated patients, non-response to anti-TNFα therapy was the major reason for treatment discontinuation. 18.2% of the infliximab-treated patients and 13.5% of the adalimumab-treated patients had to discontinue their therapy due to adverse events. CONCLUSION: Real-life remission rates of ulcerative colitis under anti-TNFα are overall low, but some patients have a clear long-term benefit.
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References25
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#1You Lian Zhou (Southern Medical University)H-Index: 1
#2Shan Xie (Southern Medical University)H-Index: 3
Last.Ye Chen (Southern Medical University)H-Index: 10
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#1WilliamJSandborn (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 134
#2Brian G. Feagan (UWO: University of Western Ontario)H-Index: 94
Last.Walter ReinischH-Index: 73
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#1WilliamJSandborn (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 134
#2Brian G. Feagan (UWO: University of Western Ontario)H-Index: 94
Last.Walter ReinischH-Index: 73
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#1WilliamJSandborn (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 134
#2G. Van Assche (Katholieke Universiteit Leuven)H-Index: 79
Last.Roopal ThakkarH-Index: 21
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#2Salvatore Bellinvia (University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust)
Last.Christopher J. EdwardsH-Index: 36
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#1Daniel J. Wong (BIDMC: Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center)H-Index: 6
#2Daniel J Wong (BIDMC: Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center)
Last.Vitaliy Poylin (BIDMC: Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center)H-Index: 9
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#1Erika Lehtola (HYKS: Helsinki University Central Hospital)H-Index: 1
#2Johanna Haapamäki (HYKS: Helsinki University Central Hospital)H-Index: 12
Last.Martti Färkkilä (HYKS: Helsinki University Central Hospital)H-Index: 59
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